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    Motox367

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/02/2020 in all areas

  1. TLDR - I’m an idiot and got in way over my head last week and paid the price. A recap of what NOT to do. Full disclosure - I am not an experienced rider. I’d put myself in the fairly mediocre category with an irrational sense of adventure and invincibility. I brought my bike on a family camping trip in a National forest. I targeted some single track to ride solo early in the morning and be back by 10 am. The trail system was very long with many entrances and exits. I chose a section in the middle that was the closest to our campsite. I did some basic research on the trail system to see that it was open and that people were riding it but (first mistake) I did not research the specific section I was considering. I rode to the trail head, confirmed that it was open to dirt bikes, and headed in. About 5 mins in I turned around due to the creek overflowing and not wanting to risk it solo (one of my ONLY good decisions this day). When I got back out to the trail head I considered going to a completely different area that was all forest service roads but I had done zero research on it so I decided to just jump on the same trail system on other side of road. The signage at the trailhead showed it was also open to dirt bikes. The creek crossing on this side was more manageable and then led to a very long and steep climb up a mountain. Overall the 1st hour was moderately challenging for me but a great ride. I got some nice pictures in and took in the amazing views. The 2nd hour, though, things started to turn and I failed to heed the clear warning signs. First, I hit a downed tree on the trail. It was medium sized but I cleared it with relative ease and kept riding. Further ahead I came to a second tree that was larger and slightly raised off the ground. I could see other rider’s tracks and that they had cleared it so I attempted it. I didn’t clear it and after a few attempts I eventually just pulled it over. Third tree, cleared, so kept riding. 4th tree - couldn’t clear it, couldn’t even pull it over, and this is where the mistakes compounded I decided to ride around it. One tree I told myself and I’ll be very gentle off trail. It wasn’t and I didn’t. It got worse from there with more downed trees and no more tracks from other riders, but I just kept pushing and trying literally anything to get through the numerous trees that lay ahead. At one point I fell down a steep slope while trying to get around another mess of tree stumps and branches that I don’t think anyone would or could ride over. I don’t know why I didn’t just turn around there after that debacle, except some internal voice telling me I needed to “just get to the end”. I finally make the midpoint peak. I know I’m very tired at this point and I now just want to get home. I have to make a choice to either turn around and deal with the same trees I just dealt with (the known), or drop into the back side (the unknown). The back side was the shortest way out and the trail headed down immediately whereas the way I can was along the ridge for a few miles before dropping down. I must have convinced myself that the downed trees were only a problem on the ridge I was currently on, and if I could just get down off this ridge quickly enough then the trails would be perfect again like they were on the front side . I decided to go down the backside on nothing more than pure hope and delusion. The heat was picking up and I was very tired so I may have even been hallucinating at this point. This decision would prove to be the most costly mistake. The trail down was steeper with loose rocks then I anticipated. The trail also had grass growing over it which should have sounded alarm bells that NO ONE was going this direction. I inevitably ran into an even more difficult downed tree that I couldn’t ride around, so continuing my rash of poor decisions I dragged the bike underneath it, draining what energy I had left. I skirted a few more trees and then hit a very tight dry creek ravine with walls taller than the bike. And then I finally hit the wall - a literal wall of completely impassable tall thicket all around me. I was done. Now 4 hours in, I turned around and headed back. I’m already at 0 energy, temps climbing towards the 90s and I’m just gassing the bike and hoping it can do ALL the work. I started crashing and flipping the bike repeatedly. I’m just a few hundred yards below the one tree I dragged the bike under an hour ago, but I can’t get over these last couple trees and get up the hill. I tried 5 or 6 different routes and they all resulted with me and the bike laying on the ground Near passing out and already late to return to my family, I finally relented that I wasn’t getting out on the bike and started calling for help. I luckily had both sat and cell signal but my wife didn’t have service at the campsite, so I called 911. They said I was too deep into the National forest, and they had no way to get me out. The deputy suggested I leave the bike and hike down the ravine I was trying to climb out of, to follow the creek, and he’d meet me at the next trailhead which was about 3.5 miles down. It was 4.7 miles back the way I came so a mile less walking sounded good, except.... there was NO trail. The backside of the mountain had apparently been both burned out by a forest fire and eroded by a series of floods with hundreds of downed trees, rock slides, numerous river crossings, and 7’ tall thicket. The deputy apparently didn’t know this or consider it. Nevertheless, it was my problem, and it was an epic disaster. It took me nearly 5 hours to hike out 3.5 miles. I ran out of water and lost cell reception in the first 30 mins. I was sending my wife my coordinates on my sat phone along the way but in hindsight there was no way anyone could find me in this mess unless I gave up and just sat there and waited for an evac (considered it at least 100x). I kept walking no matter how much my body told me to stop. I knew I was in very serious trouble (no water, risk of injury in a fall, bear skat, etc) that could potentially be fatal, but I wasn’t thinking clearly at this point. After 5 hours of complete exhaustion and dehydration I finally reached the trailhead. The County Deputy wasn’t there. No one was. I saw a water bottle, though, on a sign post which had my name written on it, along with some nuts, and knew my wife had been there. I drank that water like it was made of gold. I waited for probably 20 mins expecting that she had drove out to find a signal and that she would return but when no one came I kept walking towards the main road. I quickly realized the road to the trailhead was also washed out. My truck couldn’t make it — she must have hiked in. I kept walking. Finally. after 5 hours, I heard life. The sound of a 4 stroke. It was 3 forest rangers on their bikes. My wife had flagged them down and asked to help find me. They were in the area to do work and weren’t even aware I was in need (911 called the county sheriff and never called the forest service. Again, my problem, but my initial coordinates were in a National Forest). They gave me more water, told me my family was waiting for me at the gate to the main road, and offered me a ride on the back of their bike. My cramping wouldn’t allow it. So fittingly I had to walk another 1.5 miles out. When I rounded that final corner and saw my kids I had to put my head in my hands and cry for the first time in years. I was finally out and safe, but the pain and severe cramping continued for the next 2 days. The forest service called me on Day 2 to tell me they rode the same way I went in and cleared the trees all the way to my bike for me. They aren’t allowed to ride other peoples bikes so I’d have to hike in and get it. On the third day I hiked back in with the support of a volunteer rider from the local bike club to help me recover my bike and gear. The forest service had also added numerous signs warning people that the trail was now closed to dirt bikes past the midpoint peak and they left a log to block the trail at the backside drop-in as a final warning to idiots like me. The 4.7 mile hike back in to my bike took only 2 hours. My ride out wasn’t easy, though, as my nerves were shot with too much sitting, death grips and generally bad form, but it was very helpful to know I had the support of another rider if something happened. I eventually made it out with the bike without incident. I rode back to the campsite, put it back on the truck and drove back home with the family. I am so thankful to the US Forest Service and the local bike club that helped me. They could have just lectured me on how stupid I was but instead they just tried to help. I have since promised my wife and kids that I will NEVER ride solo again. Telling the story of my mistakes, to anyone that will listen, is my way of sealing that promise. ✌️ edit: The forest service rangers told me there was a sign at mid-peak that said the backside was "temporarily closed", but that they can fall over and they would check when they went back up. I believe them that it was up there, and it was clear as day when I hiked in along with a more serious sign warning what was ahead. All the more reason to not ride beyond your level of ability, because I missed ALL the signs.
    40 points
  2. Every toolbox owner should have one of these tools in his/her arsenal. It will save many hours of frustration.
    32 points
  3. Here’s what I’ve been working on. A 2006 Yz450f that I got street legal. Was a totally clapped pile of crap when I started. Built to scare small children and terrorize the streets.
    31 points
  4. First things first, take off those awful spoke skins before you ruin the nickel finish on them.
    31 points
  5. Gray plastics, black subframe, and custom decals. Let me know what you think.
    30 points
  6. I loaded the 500 and went to this Hard pack trials oriented track , they changed direction of the track, where it used to be mostly down hill ledges now its opposite, they have trials competitions there. It rained yesterday, so I figured in might be muddy, but nope dry as a bone. That had a little practice track to warm up, not too bad, before hitting the main loop. It was only 50 degrees and cloudy, i put on a wind breaker and neck gaitor, which turned out to be a bad idea, cause I was quickly sweating once the WORK began. The summer Must be really Brutal at this place. So by 3 or 4 miles I was huffin and puffin , sweating, getting up ledges , but just more and more . The picture is spread out, but the ledges are steeper and tighter. I might try this area again, but I havent hauled a bike in my truck in 20 years, its alot of work to do that , no wonder I like riding out of the Garage nowadays. . But yeah, I admit, Im just an Old Man, but still finds challenges.
    30 points
  7. I put a down payment on my 430RR-S back in December and finally picked it up on Monday 3/8. So stoked! First time ever buying a new bike, let alone a fancy schmanchy Italian machine. And last time I had a bike was back in 2007. Took it out for a little ride today and was sooooo happy!
    28 points
  8. I'm a spontaneous kinda guy.. started last Saturday afternoon and ended up today with 300 XC W.. Someone should have told me about the cold warm up needed, but I'm past that now~ hopefully no harm no foul. Real hard to get a better deal than list price on these right now. However, I squeaked out no freight, no prep, and I'm happy w that after all isn't it all that really matters.. I will take some suggestions on excellent performance mods please.. something about rk head? Idle screw? Hell, I don't even know what teeth sprockets are on it.. Oh I'll figure it out, if you don't tell me, I'm good at counting my losses lol.
    28 points
  9. 27 points
  10. Ride alone, weekdays when nobody’s out, its a different animal than riding with friends and resets different buttons for me. I can explore old springs and mines, check out a beehive or smoke my joint on a grassy mountainside away from the world.
    27 points
  11. Years ago I did some research and found some tests that the concluded the cheap helmets protected as well as the expensive helmets, the difference seemed to be comfort. one thing that was interesting was the weight of the helmet played a factor in neck injuries but there wasn’t a huge difference in weight by price, there was actually heavyish expensive helmets and lightweight ones that were pretty inexpensive. One thing I’ve certainly noticed amongst my riding friends is the ones who buy expensive helmets usually expect to get a certain amount of time (several years) out of them before they need replaced. Or are unwilling to replace an expensive helmet even after a crash because of the cost. When in reality once you hit your head they should be replaced. I feel safer replacing my well fitting inexpensive helmet after every crash where I got my head then wearing an expensive helmet I’ve crashed in. $.02
    25 points
  12. 25 points
  13. Still the same '05 SM but an update on looks. The pic above was slightly outdated as it had been stripped and naked for the past year or so... but no more! Clearly inspired by the Team Suzuki Ecstar MotoGP livery (the 2018 version). Making things line up around the phat side panel was a pain, but it mostly looks decent overall. Can't wait for some decent weather to debut it into society 😆
    24 points
  14. It's not from your bike, it's a KTM front axle nut
    24 points
  15. Loud bikes save lives. Joe
    23 points
  16. I put mine in my motel room, period. You have to stay in motels with parking lot access on the ground floor, but I've never once been hassled for doing this.
    23 points
  17. Pics and vids if got them 🏁🏁 my many years of racing ending a year ago with a bad injury to my spinal cord. Be nice to see how you guys are doing or even maybe could give some advice if wanted. Few old racing pics of me to start off . From midd 90s to the last race I ever did in 19' next to last pic
    22 points
  18. Your whole problem is those spoke skins.
    22 points
  19. Inflation. When you print trillions of dollars and shut down most major industries this is generally what happens. blame the current governments who have a hard on for socialism and state run everything, and everyone who took the Monopoly money bribes.
    22 points
  20. Friend lost his race trailer w car spare motor from hotel. Was there at 5 am seeing out bathroom window. Gone at 7. Went to a local airport and hired someone to fly around with him. Trailer had the car number painted on roof. The spotted it parked behind a ag building on a farm. Got pleasure of seeing sheriff cars roll in .
    21 points
  21. Ok, I've had sponsors over the years, but it was small things like gear, helmet, entry fees and fuel. Well, I had a customer come through the shop today for some questions and advice about his Audi. He was passing through, and had some fault lights on. I scanned and cleared them and told him that they were nothing of concern, and did not charge him. While we were talking, it didn't take long for the conversation to turn to Mx. After a bit yacking back and forth, he said he is retired from the construction/real estate business, and runs a Vet series in the Midwest that sometimes goes out West too. I took him upstairs above my office where I keep all my trophies, and I'm guessing he was impressed. To shorten this up, he is going to sponsor me for his upcoming series later this summer. There is no direct cash to be made, but it will pay all expenses related to me and Teresa getting to, and following the series. You start adding up fuel, food, travel, rv spots, entry fees, race bike expenses, it's a quite fair sum of money. As mentioned, there will be no money to me, just everything paid to follow his series. It's free racing, and we get to travel the Midwest, and West. In return for this sponsorship, I have to sign up under his race team name, and post all my results and stories on his blog/site. At my age, this is my pro career lol. I'll update as things progress.
    21 points
  22. I don’t know how I would sleep at night knowing some stranger is doing creepy things to my motorcycle. I would also feel terrible if I crashed someone else’s bike. sharing is for socialists.
    21 points
  23. I recently bought a 2002 WR250 with a seized engine with a goal to rebuild it. As I read the manual, I realized (once more) there are many "special tools" (see schematics) to tear down and rebuild a single cylinder engine. Two of the tools are the magneto (flywheel) holder and clutch tool. After some research and figuring out they both cost well over $120, I decided to build my own. I want to share the design and hope others find this useful. Both tool have a common high-level purpose - hold a rotating mass in place with enough stability to allow disassembly/reassembly. I am sure other have probably done similar things but I could not find them. Anyways, the third image is my home made tool - > about $6 in parts. The components are 3/16" cold rolled steel, 1 inch wide and misc. hardware (bolts). Since I have both a welder and a tap and die set, all it took was about 1 hour to make this. It works for both clutch and magneto sides.
    21 points
  24. no way is a 250F as fun to ride as a 250 2T. 🤷🏻‍♂️😎
    21 points
  25. I’ve found not living near major cities is the best way to avoid people with low enough morals to steal a motorcycle.
    20 points
  26. Remember that it may be done under the guise of environmentalism but it's the corn lobby that's actually driven ethanol fuel blending. It's an energy negative subsidy program, more gas is burned growing and processing the corn than us saved by burning it but they don't care as long as it sells their corn.
    20 points
  27. Our new visitor count for Q1 2021 vs. Q1 2020. Remember, a dirt bike is an investment in YOU. It's not an asset in any other way. Just about everyone loses value in the end and it costs money to run. Since tomorrow is promised to no man, if you wanna ride now, buy the bike, have a lot of fun and don't worry about it.
    20 points
  28. About 60% done on my #LoungeRebuild.. Wife's not best pleased but didn’t want the bike rusting in the cold damp air… Was originally a 2005 Drz400e but I’ve swapped out the forks for sm with a respring and rear subframe to the sm, racetech rear spring, crf450 master cylinder had the frame powder coated, valve cover powder coated, engines been painted again as the old coating of whatever it was had started to chip/break away at the seams. Just waiting on my cylinder head to come back after I snapped the exhaust stud off trying to replace it… can’t wait to ride the bike again, been a long 4 years with it non running..
    19 points
  29. I'm all about ThumperTalk for the community of dirt bikers that wouldn't know one another if not for the internet... But.... Daily I am blown away by the onslaught of ill formed questions that would not need to be asked if anyone would do the first thing you should ALWAYS do when acquiring a new machine: BUY THE FREAKING OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL....!!!!!!!!! If you don't want all the specs and information straight from the company that designed and built your machine.... WTF is wrong with your brain?!? I can totally see people needing help with sorting things out after checking the manual, but I just can't imagine all the basic BS level questions asked .... Even down to things like oil changes and chain tightening ... I'm totally down with helping people ....after they have done what I consider the absolute minimum to help themselves with the PURCHASE OF THE OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL...!!!!! Hard copy... Not pdf... So you can write tuning details and notes in it for future reference... I almost believe that the millennial generation needs a YouTube video to tie their shoes or wipe their ass... As if READING has become a lost dark art... This thread was finally inspired by a thread I had read this morning where links to videos were being posted for someone begging for help with oil change and chain tightening information.... There is absolutely nothing that guarantees the person in the video knows his ass from a hole in the ground, or himself owns an OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL for his reference... Yet people take is as gospel... Hard to imagine.... Anyways.... Had to get that off my chest... Don't be so lazy and cheap as to not do the bare bones minimum and skip a few IPA's or White Claw Seltzer's or whatever you non manual buying Nancy Boys drink ...and save up for a manual... Do it.... The world will become a better place... One IQ point at a time 🤘👍😎
    19 points
  30. So I tried a little fork experiment with my 2021 Beta 300 RE. I swapped the KYBs with the MX-Tech Luckys that are on my 500. Here is what I found... Disclaimer: I am in no way a professional, at anything. This is just food for thought. I'm happy to take advice as much as I can. I'll happily give advice, but only based on my personal experiences and opinions. Just to clarify, I love the way my Beta 500 is set up with the MX-Tech fork and their National Shock. That bike gets traction all over, super smooth over chatter, and never bottoms out. On to the experiment> I tested both sets of forks on the same trails, but a couple weeks apart. The KYBs give a sense of confidence when smashing into rocks and roots. You can hit things slow or fast, and the front wheel stays perfectly straight. Even in that "oh sh*t" moment where I thought I was going to hit an object too fast and too hard, the KYBs totally saved me. The KYBs are much more playful also, as in you can purposely pop up and over things by heading right into them. Hit a small root and pop the whole bike up and over a predictable section of trail, no problem. They also eat up whoops very well, not getting too deep into the stroke and not bucking the bike back and forth too much. The only issue running these forks is I feel the shock is a little mismatched. Even with the Lainer adjuster and bladder in the shock, the Sachs shock will drop much further into the stroke hitting the same object as the forks. And when in a corner, the rear sags more; which makes the front traction feel slightly vague. Now the MX-Techs. These are open cartridge inserts that are in the Sachs tubes. I understand they are sprung for a heavier bike, but they actually felt extremely balanced on the 300. The bike with MX-Tech and Sachs rear shock felt like it bounded and rebounded very level (after a few clicks of adjustment to the shock). Corners felt very predictable and front end traction was a easier to find. The downside is when I smack into an object or hit consecutive rocks. The bike doesn't pop up and over things, instead the front end would kick sideways a bit. The bars would fight more when in a long rocky section. I lost a bit of confidence in the rough stuff, but gained confidence in the corners. VERDICT: I'm going to go back to the KYBs on the 300, and maybe mess with the valving on fork and shock to get the bike to feel more balanced front and back. But it was fun to throw on a set of very nice open cartridges and see the pros and cons. I just felt the KYBs stayed in control as the speeds went up, and I can't believe how straight they stay when hitting obstacles. Plus the MX-Tech fork and National shock setup on the 500 feels very very comfortable, and I don't want to lose that.
    19 points
  31. Disregard oil and premix ratio recommendations. Has nothing to do with it. You are on the right track with jetting, you can lean out the pilot and needle clip to get it right. Might need to drop the main jet as well. It will not foul plugs once it is dialed in.
    19 points
  32. You split the cases. You would be insane to not completely go through the bottom end to insure there is no metal anywhere in your bottom end.
    19 points
  33. Like this comment if you think OP should be perma-banned.
    19 points
  34. How do you restore your soul? Psalm 23 keeps coming to mind. This is my "green pastures"
    19 points
  35. That you need to run a quiet pipe to keep the neighborhood Karen’s happy. this teaches the Karen’s they have some sort of authority or say. Do the opposite of what ever the Karen’s ask.
    18 points
  36. I recently installed a set of ACT wide ration gears in my 2017 S model with a STOCK engine. I intentionally installed them on a STOCK engine to see how they really affected the power and performance on a stock engine. Only power mods I have are a JD jet kit (sea level) and 3x3. I just wanted to KNOW for sure what ACT gears and stock engine really felt like. Seemed like everyone on the internet had an opinion but no one had actually done it or had any firsthand experience with ACT + stock. I wanted to do a true DIY, basic shade tree mechanic, low budget install. I did not spend any extra on new bearings, bushings, pumps, circlips, etc. Just gaskets. I was prepared to replace anything I found needed replacing, but the motor only has about 1000 miles on it so everything is still new-ish. And I have the time, tools, and means to tear back into it later if need be. And being in the US parts generally aren’t weeks away. This was my first time tearing a 4-stroke motorcycle engine this far apart. I’ve done other small engines like 2-stroke bikes, lawnmowers, weed-eaters, etc in the past, but never a 4-stroke. I’ve built supercharged V8s and tons of other automotive stuff on the past, so I was pretty confident I could figure out a single cylinder thumper. A service manual was helpful too lol. Everything came apart and went back together easily enough. Modifying the shift forks was pretty straightforward and easy. I took some pics along the way and made notes, etc. And had the service manual. It fired right up and ran like it had before the tear down. I now have almost 300 miles on it since the install. Still running fine. So the surgery was a success. What about the results?? …………… I’m still kind of an old newbie just got back on a bike after almost 30 years off. So take my opinion and observations with a grain of salt. Others may feel differently depending on their advanced skill levels, more aggressive riding style, experience level, etc... Before the install I put almost 1000 miles on it with stock trans. I had settled on 15/41 for a split of highway and barely decent 1st gear. But I felt 1st was too fast for tight trails, and 5th was still kind of buzzing at 70+mph. After the install I started with 14/44 sprockets. With the 14/44 first gear is good and low and great for slow speed tight stuff. And with the ACT gears I could cruise at 70mph at about 6000 rpm. But I don't plan on cruising at 70 all the time though, and at about 60mph the rpms in 5th felt too low, out of the powerband. But shifting down to 4th was a little too high. It needed something in between. So.... I installed a 47T rear and it raised the rpm range just enough that it’s now perfect for my use. First gear is super low now and it can tractor along at less than 10mph no problem. And 5th is like an overdrive and I can cruise at 70mph at about 6200-6300rpm. Power wise I think it's still plenty powerful for regular dual sport riding. The only time it felt like it needed more power was when I still had the 44T rear sprocket installed. I was riding up a slight grade on the highway, in 5th gear, 65ish mph, with a very strong headwind and my 220lb ass on it. The rpms were a little low, out of the powerband, and it was slow to accelerate up the hill but it did accelerate. I could have downshifted and pinned it, but didn't feel the need, since I wasn't in a race lol. Now with the 47T I don’t think this will be much of an issue. And keep in mind this was all done with a stock 2017 S model motor. If/when I feel the need for more power, an FCR will be first. Then either new exhaust or big-bore and/or cams. A stroker crank would be nice later, but it’s low on the priority list right now. Now I (we) know. It's not horrible. It's totally useable. So if someone wants the wide ratio gears, but can't afford or justify a big bore, stroker, FCR etc... all at the same time.... You can do ACT gears, then later easily add bbk, cams, FCR, exhaust, etc... The only thing that would be best to do at the same time as the ACT gears is a stroker crank since it requires splitting the cases. My video editing skills suck but here’s a short acceleration video when I still had the 44T rear sprocket on. Not the best but gives you an idea. It still gets up and goes pretty good. https://youtu.be/841jaPhMGd8 Here’s some slow speed riding with the 14/47 combo… https://youtu.be/BBmW5qhWJD4 Here’s some highway speed with the 14/47 combo… https://youtu.be/qai_YeUODFM
    18 points
  37. My career as an environmental engineer has shown me that most environmental causes in USA are a sham and most regulators go way to far in their proposals. The truth of air quality is air has improved steadily since 1974 and many air quality issues are nearly gone as it already stands here. Check for youself with air quality data from your local weather station. But to a broader point the future of EPA and all other government agencies depends on your vote and your input to politicians, fight back in a constructive way, our favorite dirtbikes, cars, and trucks, hell our whole lifestyle is at stake. Nothing against ebikes, cars, etc. but to mandate them will wreak most of our economy.
    18 points
  38. I'm partially paraplegic after a paragliding accident in 2016, I can stand with support but can't walk so rely on my wheelchair 99% to move around. Found out that I could ride my old Suzuki K50 moped and handle it on my own and lift it up when I tipped over. Started tuning it and later rebuilt it completely, began as a street tracker style which turned a bit offroad as I wanted to ride gravel and trails as it's illegal now doing 120kph instead of 30kph. Had to run from the cops on the moped once so got this Suzuki GP125 as a legal alternativ, it's an old 2 stroke so it's just as fun as tuning a moped and lightweight enough for me to handle. And it has a rotary disc valve which makes it more interesting. Hope to get it finished this summer. Here you can follow the build if you want, https://www.sporthoj.com/forum/threads/suzuki-gp125-81-vintage-racer.289404/
    18 points
  39. Sounds to me like you are putting your expectations on him. If he wants to go faster and really race, he will ask for pointers. If he is happy and having fun the way things are, then you are succeeding. In every race, someone wins, someone comes in dead last.
    18 points
  40. I used VP "water jugs". The new EPA compliant gas cans are a huge joke. I've never spilled so much gas as when the government decided they could design a better gas can. I've had some of them literally shoot a 20 foot fountain of gas into the air when you unlock the nozzle because of pressure built up in them since they won't vent. Yeah that's smart, great for the environment and the fact they cost 3x more than old style cans is just frosting on the cake. Doc
    18 points
  41. I would imagine it's short to provede a little spring load. But l think those things are a gimmick, l wouldnt even use it.
    18 points
  42. It began with a vague ad on Facebook Marketplace, showing an old Gas Gas enduro bike that didn't run. The seller wanted $1000. That was less than my Trump Check. Three days later we were in a trailer park in the middle of nowhere, loading up pieces of what was supposedly a Gas Gas. The reality of the bike--the stripped-down, faded, abused mess that it was--had tempered my enthusiasm and left me wrestling with my good sense. I had talked the kid down to $500 and his mother assured us of the VIN-less frame, "hell no, it ain't stole!", so we rolled out of the trailer park with the most miserable looking bike I've ever bought in tow. The first order of business was finding the VIN number. Remarkably, it was intact under the powder coating. It wasn't just the frame that was powder coated, either: the handlebars, linkage, footpegs, skid plate, triple clamps, wheel hubs, swing arm, subframe, brake pedal, shifter, and expansion chamber were painted too. It was well suited to be a rust-free boat anchor. A VIN check produced confirmation that our disaster project was, at least, not stole. So my husband embarked on an 8-month long "6-week rebuild." Neither of us knew it was possible to hold a European motorcycle together with nothing but over-sized Home Depot hardware, but 17-year-old dirt bikes are often full of wonderful surprises. As the Gas Gas rebuild progressed, I continued to ride the worn out XR200 that has been my partner for the last four years. We had long ago quit maintaining it, since all efforts were going into the Gasser, and over the months the bike smoked more as the brakes worked less. The suspension creaked like an old seesaw laboring under two chubby youths. And yet, as much as I was ready to put my XR days behind me, it just wouldn't give me an excuse. Hot, cold, flooded, crashed…the damn bike just wouldn't. stop. running. Last month, by good fortune (in other words: a loan), I added a third beast to the stable by acquiring a Beta trials bike. In stark contrast to the Gas Gas, the Beta was a low hour, all-original beauty. I parked the XR in the most inaccessible corner of the garage, realizing that it was now third in line for my affections. The Gas Gas, albeit temperamental and injury-prone, had been restored to an athletic, aggressive race machine and was the bike I drooled over. The trials bike--refined, clean, and preppy--was pure eye candy and always gave me a good time. When these hot shots let me down, I know the XR will still answer my call. I tried to make the relationship work when he was all I had, but deep down, I knew it would never lead to anything more. Reliable, easy-going, and patient though he is, he is "the nice guy": a bike that I could only ever like, but never love. The XR has been officially friend-zoned. The author and the XR200, in the height of their relationship.
    18 points
  43. The EPA was a factor but the AMA truely killed them off with the displacement rule. Until then it was 250 vs 250, period. Then, all of a sudden, 400+cc is allowed in the 250 class. Much like the US govenment caters to the intrest of bankers(therefore corporations) over the citizen, the AMA put the intrest of corpotations over the common member they claimed to represent. Remember, until the 4 stroke takeover, you could race as a privateer on a bike several years old and be competive often finishing in the top 20% of the field. 4 strokes didnt become main stream because they were faster, lighter or anything resembling superiority. They became main stream because they increased profits and sales of new bikes. Did it help the sport? I don't believe so. 4 strokes cost more to buy, race, maintain, repair, exc while needing 80% more engine. The problem is the common people have no idea how much power they hold. We could have demanded that they withdraw the displacement rule and backed it up with a boycott...but we didn't. We just listened to the magazines (media) about how much better they were. Not lighter, faster, cheaper, more reliable, exc but.....more trackable. Its a 450 vs 250 and they have to stretch to make it seem better. Q: what killed the 2 stroke? A: greed. That is why the AMA will never get a cent from me. If 4 strokes were better, they would be able to stand on their own in comparison to 2 strokes and not need a 80% advantage. You might as well give them a lap time handicap. It's as asinine as letting a 20 year old pro race in the 50+ vet class.
    18 points
  44. I'm a member of Firemed in Oregon. Recently I had a crash that required airlift to Enloe Medical Center in Northern California. Much to my surprise, I will have no out of pocket expense for this, as Enloe's helicopter ambulance is included in the Life Flight Network. Nice peace of mind, covers all household dependents for 124$ a year for air and ground service. If you travel a lot and ride the greater West, this is a must have, plus it supports a local service that otherwise wouldn't exist. I'm posting this because I don't recall seeing it before.
    17 points
  45. Finally after many months of waiting for parts and pieces, paint, etc. Its finally going back together. Yesterday and today I made decent progress. Brakes next, then subframe, rear fender, front fender pipe and muffler then carb, air box and fuel tank.
    17 points
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