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numroe

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About numroe

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    Male
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    Australia
  • Interests
    1. Riding MX bikes. 2. Watching MX bikes race. 3. Working on dirt bikes. 4. Most sport. 5. Chocolate

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  1. numroe

    ANOTHER YZ250 Suspension Post...

    Correct. It's been a few years since I fiddled with the SSS to OC fork conversion and swapped between them. So memory fading, but ... I'm running the 2004 forks now, with the 2004 axle + nut. I have a 2010 front brake caliper + line. I always use the modern type brake line routing. I'm fairly sure that when swapping SSS to/from OC that the fork needs its own matching caliper mount bracket part. Because my SSS forks in storage have the mount bracket on them. With the 2010 caliper on the 2004 forks (today's config) I have some little alum spacers on the mount bolts to correct the alignment with the rotor.
  2. numroe

    ANOTHER YZ250 Suspension Post...

    For fast rough trails and some MX track riding the SSS CC forks have more potential. For slightly slower riding when more low speed travel required the OC forks feel nicer. But the potential of each depends a lot on the springs and valving. I think the OC forks generally have a more connected to the ground feeling while the CC forks can perform more consistent when pushed harder. I don't recommend you run the stock YZF valving in those SSS CC forks. Best to look at the stock 2 stroke SSS valving as the reference. For some off road riding the stock 2S valving needs to be a little softer on comp and the rebound more progressive. The base comp is fine stock. The mid comp needs to be softer for very high speed and wider float, so you feel less ground feedback. The rebound needs to be a little more progressive for better tire connection at lower speeds. Mid recommendation: Remove one face shim. Also swap the 17.3 cup shim closest to the piston with a 15.3 so the face shims can blow open further. Way more plush on very high speed impacts. Reb recommendation: Swap the 13.12 x-over shim with an 11.15 and stiffen the second stage stack by adding one 20.1 shim after the x-over. I also prefer a larger 11mm clamp shim.
  3. numroe

    ANOTHER YZ250 Suspension Post...

    I only know what I know, and it could be wrong anyway. I have put SSS on a YZ250 and they re easy to fit and perform great with suitable springs and valving. Then I decided to use the bike more for trail riding and reinstalled the 2004 48mm KYB forks with some valving mods and I prefer them more for the bush. I have 22mm offset triples off a 2011 YZ450F (top clamp bored out 1mm) and really like the handling. If you are riding off road trails I recommend you stick with the 2004 OC forks. They can work really well with very simple valving mods with correct springs for you, and the lugs are much tougher at coping with impacts. To fit those SSS forks you should also get the matching axle, spacers, brake hanger+caliper. Depending on what bike your SSS forks came off you might need to change the upper triple clamps. Here is some info that might help. I have not checked what the 2016+ bikes are using. Fork tube diams: All 48mm KYB have a 59.0mm lower clamp. 2004-14 2 strokes: Upper 56.0mm. 2005-09 YZ450F: Upper 56.0. Triple offset 25 2005-12 YZ250F: Upper 56.0. Triple offset 25 2010-15 YZ450F: Upper 54.0. Triple offset 22mm 2013-15 YZ250F: Upper 54.0. Triple offset 22mm 2006-2012 KX450F: Upper 54.0
  4. numroe

    Xplor fork solutions

    I agree with Terry about marketing gimmicks selling bikes. 1000s of examples over decades. Perhaps the other side of this fork performance gap is a very wrong assumption at KTM (which includes Husky and WP) about their customers ... Today's bike owners/riders are knowledgable enough to know that the same dirtbike can handle well and be comfortable on slow technical rocks/roots on trails AND also perform very well on fast rough trails. We CAN have the cake and eat it, and we don't need new technology. It only needs good old designs with good settings. As I wrote earlier, because of this, KTM have given many other brands a good slice of their market share, so I think it's great competition for us, the consumers. Bring on more crappy fork designs and/or settings.
  5. numroe

    Xplor fork solutions

    That's exactly what I cannot figure. As you said, changes do sell, since suckers will buy the marketing gimmicks, but in suspension, people expect better these days. It's hard to ignore what a 20 year old OC fork design can do when the fork is mechanically healthy and given good internal valve setups.
  6. numroe

    Xplor fork solutions

    That's the baffling thing. First it was 4cs, now Xplore. How did they choose a cheap design with bad settings which performs inadequately for such a large percentage of their target customers. Meanwhile 15 year old OC forks with good internal settings are hard to fault by the vast majority of trail riders and can work reasonably well on slow rock beds or fast and rough MX tracks.
  7. numroe

    What did you do to your YZ today?

    I mean strip raw and polished. So easy. Never paint them.
  8. numroe

    What did you do to your YZ today?

    Great job. Why not clean up that clutch cover?
  9. numroe

    What did you do to your YZ today?

    You cannot compare hours or maintenance intervals for MX with jumps versus trail hacking. It's choice too. Try to imagine your thoughts after you spent a week in hospital and 3 months off work due to a bike failure. Versus a breakdown in the bush with your mate there to get you home.
  10. numroe

    suspension deflects towards end of race

    So they wont be ingesting faster than usual. But always good to tune your outer oil level (air spring) so you can bottom them out at times to let them bleed off. I wasn't thinking of too much air in the outers. My 47mm Showas don't seem to pump up much at all in the outers - with healthy Showa seals and bushes. I was/am wondering if you have too much air inside for some reason. So that air heats and expands creating more spring force, and the foaming of the oil reduces damping force making you feel even more spring force (air+coil) which creates the deflection issue late in rides. This was why I asked "Can you feel if that late ride stiffness feels more like damping or spring type force? When it's a springy stiffness you can usually tell because of the rebound action, also stroke speed doesn't matter." That could be an important clue, if you can feel the difference. I've changed springs and damping a lot so I can pick it quite quickly. A lack of damping can easily feel harsh and sketchy. I suppose so. To stop wondering, go for a test ride in the morning with just 2L in the tank and +2 psi in the tire. Wild guess ... Maybe it's something related to fork oil temp, and friction. You could try different oil type in the outers. I always use Dexron VI ATF inside and out and love the stuff compared to various other options I tried. It's super slippery and gives consistent damping on long harsh rides too. It's about 7.5wt at 40C so a little thicker than usual (2.5 to 5wt) but you can soften your low speed damping to compensate if this bothers you.
  11. numroe

    Xplor fork solutions

    I expect (and hope) KTM engineers knew and know Xplor is not a performance increment over the 20 year old OC design. So I think it's all about reduced cost. I know all the brands have been attempting cost cutting for the past 10 years, but the Xplor choice still baffles me after the amount of sales and customers 4CS lost for KTM. $700 sounds like a too much for springs and a re-valve, but springs + revalve is accepted end user cost, and way cheaper than most kits. When mog said Xplor "mainly needs an adjuster from the OC fork" to be "ridable and adjustable" that makes me guess the result is still average performance. Average performance is fine for a cheap fork, but it still leaves me wondering why compromise the brand image so much when the old OC design with good settings is proven the test of time to be able to give great performance for trail use. In a bike that costs so much, the Xplor fork should have this adjuster from the factory, with settings that also work on rough fast trails. For years it seems like KTM stock suspension settings are best on slow rock beds or smooth trails and no good elsewhere. Maybe they need to change their testing routine? I don't know, but mainly they (orange+white) do seem to continue bleeding their dominant market share to the other brands, which is a good thing for us consumers, so I don't care.
  12. numroe

    Do I need a new bottom end?

    I think you're ok to not clutch on down shifts if you can be patient going down the gears and don't spike the revs suddenly. Otherwise give the clutch a flick. Up shifts without clutch is ok if you partly flick off the throttle while you shift. Light foot half shifting the lever is always nasty and stomping the lever can obviously damage parts inside. How a transmission is treated when being run-in seems to determine the ease of shift action for the remainder of its life. Eg. If you have a new bike with a stubborn transmission and the owner is a transmission butcher then it'll get worse and stay that way.
  13. numroe

    Do I need a new bottom end?

    Based on doc's info, I guess the first gear damage is from the common use csse of half-shifting into first with a cold motor that won't idle and is prone to stall. That is when the RPMs are held too high, clutch plates cold/dry/grabby with a light half-shift foot tap of the lever. I see people do that quite regularly with 2 strokes. I cringe a bit more when they do it to second gear.
  14. numroe

    What did you do to your YZ today?

    Thanks. That wear in the top doesn't look like an issue. I guess the extra wear on one inside is from your chain joining link pins+clip. I'm running a 48T rear (295cc kit), so that might explain why the lower side of mine seems to be wearing at a reasonable rate. But I will keep an eye on the replaceable block and get a couple of spares. Strange that Acerbis didn't design it to work best with a stock 50T rear, but I'm happy and lucky it's up a little higher and hits things less often on rough trails.
  15. numroe

    Xplor fork solutions

    Thinking about the subject of this thread... So many old threads on 4CS. Seems like here we go again with Xplor. Various kits being promoted as the only real fix. These bikes are expensive new. What's going on at KTM and WP? I mean how did they not learn from the 4CS chapter of their business? Yamaha, Beta, Sherco, etc must be loving this. Cost cutting goals I can understand, but it seems like a massive failure when trying to market a premium brand while simple and very effective open chamber forks from KYB and Showa have been in production since the 1990s. KTM had the Japanese brands pinned down by the throat just a few years back, but released their grip by persisting with sub-standard fork designs. I'm not suggesting KTM are not highly successful. But I am wondering what could have been. Plus confused why.
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