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stringer

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About stringer

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    California
  1. stringer

    Need gas, Carb, and Cluch advice.

    Oddly enough I ran into an old friend last night. He's worked cars, motorcycles, turbochargers, and earth moving equipment for a living. I used to help him rebuild cars when we were kids. Anyway, I asked him about the white stuff in the gas. He told me: “Since everybody in my neighborhood knows I know how to fix engines, they bring me their lawn mowers, edgers, weed eaters and such when they won't start. A while back they started bring them to me a lot more often and I started noticing that white stuff in the carbs. My sense is after talking to them that the gas is going bad after only two or three weeks.” Three weeks!? I used to own a sailboat. One tank of fuel could last a year or more and with out fuel stabilizers. No problems. Now gas only lasts three weeks? What the.... Since this is the case I'm going to kludge together an electric fuel pump and filter to drain my tank after every ride. I'll put the fuel in my truck. (Don't worry, I won't blow my self up.) As for long term storage.... It wasn't supposed to be sitting that long. It just worked out that way. As for cleaning the carburetor, I'll be doing that myself. I think there's a mod or two out there I might want to do also. For the long term, I'm planning some experiments to see if this is from moisture, oxidation, and related to light. (I have a “clear” tank.) And if any of the fuel stabilizers will prevent it. Thanks for all the advice, Stringer
  2. What a bad couple of days! After a 4 months of no riding, I got a chance to get back on my bike. ('06 TE450) I went to prep it the night before and it wouldn't start. Must be bad gas, so I drained it and it was WHITE, like milk. Rinsed the tank out a bunch of times with new gas then added some Gumout and got the bike to start, but it would only idle and only with the choke on. Goosed the throttle a while until it would run through 2/3 of it but would still die if I gave it too much throttle. Also, it would still only run with the choke on. So the next day I took it to a dry lake bed (I wouldn't do any trails with it like this) and played with it until it would run (but not idle) with the choke off. Got it home and the cluch won't disengage! So my questions are: Has anybody seen gas turn white when it goes bad? After I let the bad gas sit for a while it settled out. It's a white powder. It has kind of like a soapy feel to it. Are the O'ring gaskets on the carburetor reusable? Is there any trick to stripping one down to clean and putting it back together? (Any special tools or parts that must be replaced? Any trick to getting it off the bike? Is this a common problem? Is there any history of the cluch hydrolics going bad? Assuming I need to remove the cluch cover, do I need a new gasket or is it a reusable O'ring? Is there any thing I need to look for? Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks in advance, Stringer
  3. stringer

    Rattle rattle

    Mount the license plate with four screws. Mine had just two and the rattle happened only over 30 to 40mph. It took me some time to figure out. stringer
  4. stringer

    Husky - Hard to Kick, Milky Oil

    Regarding your "tan" oil. I think there is a possibility that it's due to "Pilot Error" and not an engine problem. If the guy was tring to sell the bike (and he was) and washed it real good, he might have gotten a lot of water in the air box, and from there down the CC vent to the oil. (Assuming it has a vent from the box to the CC.) As long as you get the oil/water out in time it might not hurt anything. Just a possibility. Stringer
  5. stringer

    Husky - Hard to Kick, Milky Oil

    You probably know this but.... If it's gas in the oil, you can smell it. If it's coolant, you should be low on coolant. Also, I've never seen gas turn oil tan. If you're in doubt, change the oil, top off the coolant, get it started and let it warm up, let it cool down, then check the oil color and coolant level. Good luck, stringer
  6. stringer

    Battery/alternator question

    Good advice.
  7. stringer

    Battery/alternator question

    I'm thinking that maybe water got in the switch and conducted enough to drain the battery over a few hours but not enough to drive the horn, at least not audibly. I did check the battery when I thought it was dead, and indeed it was dead. I am surprised by your experience. I would have thought that anything electrical on a motorcycle would be waterproof, and my problem was just a quirk. Bikes get rained on a lot. But if you got stuff in your switches after washing your bike, as I believe I did, then they evidently aren't very waterproof. I think this might be worth a West Marine visit for better switches/buttons. (Boating store)
  8. stringer

    Battery/alternator question

    I charged the battery on 5-20. I went out to start the bike (to check the battery) on 6-17 and the sucker started right up. So I thinking, maybe a wet horn switch from washing my bike. stringer
  9. stringer

    2007 Te 450 larger gas tank

    For what it worth, I did the math, and if you consider the bike is about 260lbs wet, the center of gravity is high to begin with, and you're not adding that much weight in fuel that much higher, the center of gravity does not change much. In fact, I don't notice a thing. Even picking up the bike after an upset. I can't tell any differece at all. Now, I'm not racing either! But, I do think that one or two liters in the back pack would make a difference on MY center of gravity. And also more of a difference on the bike+rider center of gravity, then just the tank because it would be carried much higher then the tank. As far as an impact on handling, I think a higher tank might have a negitive impact, but again, I don't notice it. Maybe that's because the volume (and weight) of fuel that's added is really not that much. At least not compared to the bike, the rider, and my pack. Maybe it's because I'm not doing anything radical. I'm kind of a new rider. It's also possible that the IMS tank, lowers the center of gravity and improves the handling. I was a little more concerned about the Clarke tanks impact on the family jewels! But, the fear seems to be unfounded. You just slide down to the seat, pain free. As you say, airflow might be a consideration with the IMS. I don't have a fan and have not had any heating issues. Some people claim, the IMS impacts air flow, some people say no. IMS has one definite advantage, you can put the skins back on and retain the Husky profile. I like that. stringer
  10. stringer

    2007 Te 450 larger gas tank

    I've seen the rear mount tank, but I wonder if the support will hold up to the added weight and abuse on the trail. There is also a front mount that replaces the number plate but that adds some weight to the front and I don't like the thought of added weight to the front. http://www.acerbis.com/p150_tank/11250006.html IMO I think a larger tank is the best choice. When I was looking for mine, I asked some mechanical engineers I work with (and ride) what they thought of IMS and Clarke and both told me to get the Clarke regarding quality. One had both IMS and Clarke (two bikes) and liked Clarke. But, in reality both tanks will serve you well. BTW, consider getting a "natural" color tank so you can see the fuel you have left in the tank. stringer
  11. stringer

    2007 Te 450 larger gas tank

    http://www.clarkemfg.com/ http://www.clarkemfg.com/cgi-bin/miva?Merchant2/merchant.mv+Screen=PROD&Store_Code=CM&Product_Code=1463&Category_Code=husqvarna Got one. No problems. Love it.
  12. stringer

    Battery/alternator question

    Thanks all for the advice. I charged the battery and it held overnight. Also the alternator is putting out 13.3 volts. So now I'm a little confused as to why it was dead. I washed the bike a week ago, I wonder if I got water in the horn switch or something and that's what drained the battery. I'll wait a week or so and see if it holds before I buy a new battery. Thanks again, Stringer
  13. stringer

    Hygroscopic

    I've not tested this but my understanding is that when the clutch handle is all the way out, the fluid is open from the reservoir to the solenoid at the clutch (slave solenoid). This is so the system can automatically adjust if there is a small leak or expansion and contraction of the fluid due to temperature differences.
  14. stringer

    Hygroscopic

    Assuming that your Husky is like mine and uses mineral oil for the clutch: http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/hayesu_product6.shtml says: B. Mineral oil Mineral oils are also used in brake systems but are not controlled by any specific standards. Mineral oil does not absorb water and can break down with time and heat. Low ambient temperatures will cause a mineral oil to congeal and the system to have sluggish performance (<20ºF ). Some mineral oils are more environmentally friendly than DOT Brake Fluid, however oil is still an oil and should be disposed of properly. As for causing the clutch to slip.... I can't see it. The wet clutch uses the engine oil at the friction plates, not the "clutch fluid " in the control system. However, I have read that the wrong engine oil can cause some clutch slipping. Or stated better, it can cause the clutch to slip under less load. Motorcycle oils have a rating that specifies they can be used with wet clutches. I believe you want JASO MA rated oil if you have a wet clutch. Check the propaganda on the oil bottle to be sure. Stringer
  15. Well, it looks like I need a battery for my 06 TE450. Any advice on good/bad brands? Before I get a battery I'd like to check the alternator. Does anybody know of a amperage@rpm spec for this bike? Thanks in advance, Stringer
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