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YZ250F06

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About YZ250F06

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    motocross22@hotmail.com

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    New York
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    mx, working on bikes, snowboarding other sports

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  1. YZ250F06

    YZ125 POWERVALVE, 2004 vs 2005

    Thank you SmokinJoe90! I will save myself the headache and just find a set from an 05+
  2. Hello and thank you for reading this! Does anyone know if the powervalves from a 2004 YZ125 will fit into a 2005 YZ125 (even with small modification)? To buy a new powervalve assembly for a newer bikes (05-15) is insanely expensive, and I can get a 2004 era for about $60. They look to be the same, with slightly different mounting points in the cylinder just drill a new hole in the powervalve mounting face?) They have different Yamaha Part Numbers. Any insight would be greatly appreciated! From 2004 From 2005
  3. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    This link's dead now, but some people who have looked into this may have remembered a Suzuki rg500 that used a simple on off switch with a windshield washer pump and gained 24% power in the lower range, that's a pretty big difference. That's without modulating or mapping the injection cycles. There could be good power to be had here... Really liking that idea about Methanol injection, didn't know that it burned so much cooler. That would definitely help in the lower range for a tuned pipe. Methanol is toxic to the human body but I don't see too many guys drinking gasoline! LOL
  4. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    Very interesting read about the "slippy pipes". Very cool concept though I could see how they would be increasingly difficult on a 125 with a curved expansion chambers. Here's a video of them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOYvFgGqjUg&feature=related Water can be fully controlled without sealing issues, but obviously requires volume. Enduro bikes wouldn't benefit as they have longer trips, but in the motocross world, as long as it lasts a twenty minute moto......
  5. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    I would say that for enduro riding it would be an issue, but motos in the amateur ranks are only 20 minutes or less. And even in the pro ranks motos are 35 minutes but riders are at the high end of the RPMs when minimal water is used for the cooling effect.
  6. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    That's cool, didn't know about the staged power valves. Sounds like just what TM does with their servo-operated powervalve, basically variable actuation. And in the above post I mentioned the possibility of using one oversized radiator on the left, and then converting the right rad to a water reservoir. Obviously one oversizsed radiator isn't going to provide the cooling compared to two stock sized radiatiors, but its an idea. Other ways to pump up cooling efficiency too like an upgraded waterpump, etc. Possibily section the tank, who knows. Looking for ideas at this point. As for injection setup I've found a relatively high pressure, low volume pump requiring minimal power that fits nicely underneath the engine, mounted onto a skidplate.
  7. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    Hey guys, remember how the GP bikes in the 90s and 2000s used exhaust water injection (particularly the NSR500 beginning in 1994)? Why not put these into our motocross bikes? For those of us not too familiar, the 2-stroke exhaust (expansion chamber) works by pushing air back into the engine. Different pipes allow for different powerbands because the way that the pipe works is by using the powerful soundwave that comes out of the engine to suck exhaust out, and then when the pipe diverges the soundwave returns a negative pulse back to the engine and pushes the air/fuel from the beginning of the exhaust back into the engine. I'm sure many of us have seen this image below. So obviously sound travels at a certain velocity, and one of the factors is the temperature inside the pipe. Higher the temperature, faster the soundwave. So what the engineers at Honda did in 1994 with the NSR500 was they sprayed water into the beginning of the exhaust to "cool down" the exhaust and slow down the soundwave which allowed the same pipe to work more effectively in the lower range of the powerband, broadening the torque curve! Guys are using these in jetskis all the time (because water is a little easier to obtain when you're always in the water). Anyways, I'm currently on the quest to build a water injection system into my YZ167. I'd love to hear some ideas of how to make this happen. I'm thinking off possibly going with an oversized left radiator, and then converting the right rad into a water reservoir. Is there any chance that this will not overheat? Anybody have overheating issues in their YZ125s or big bore bikes? Does anyone else have interest in something like this? I mean the GP 500cc 2-stroke bikes were really at the pinnacle of technology and it seems as though the motocross manufacturers have almost given up on our 2-stroke motocross bikes. I've also thought about maybe sectioning a part of the gas tank and using it for water, but that will require a lot of work, less gasoline capacity, it could work on an oversized tank but then that's more weight on a bike we're trying to keep light. What do you guys think?? Lets get some brainstorming going!!
  8. YZ250F06

    Water Injection in YZ167

    Hey guys, remember how the GP bikes in the 90s and 2000s used exhaust water injection (particularly the NSR500 beginning in 1994)? Why not put these into our motocross bikes? For those of us not too familiar, the 2-stroke exhaust (expansion chamber) works by pushing air back into the engine. Different pipes allow for different powerbands because the way that the pipe works is by using the powerful soundwave that comes out of the engine to suck exhaust out, and then when the pipe diverges the soundwave returns a negative pulse back to the engine and pushes the air/fuel from the beginning of the exhaust back into the engine. I'm sure many of us have seen this image below. So obviously sound travels at a certain velocity, and one of the factors is the temperature inside the pipe. Higher the temperature, faster the soundwave. So what the engineers at Honda did in 1994 with the NSR500 was they sprayed water into the beginning of the exhaust to "cool down" the exhaust and slow down the soundwave which allowed the same pipe to work more effectively in the lower range of the powerband, broadening the torque curve! Guys are using these in jetskis all the time (because water is a little easier to obtain when you're always in the water). Anyways, I'm currently on the quest to build a water injection system into my YZ167. I'd love to hear some ideas of how to make this happen. I'm thinking off possibly going with an oversized left radiator, and then converting the right rad into a water reservoir. Is there any chance that this will not overheat? Anybody have overheating issues in their YZ125s or big bore bikes? Does anyone else have interest in something like this? I mean the GP 500cc 2-stroke bikes were really at the pinnacle of technology and it seems as though the motocross manufacturers have almost given up on our 2-stroke motocross bikes. I've also thought about maybe sectioning a part of the gas tank and using it for water, but that will require a lot of work, less gasoline capacity, it could work on an oversized tank but then that's more weight on a bike we're trying to keep light. What do you guys think?? Lets get some brainstorming going!!
  9. Hey guys, I'm opening this thread back up. I am CR85Racer12 this is just my other account, I couldn't find the password for that other account (its almost a 10 year old account) So I'm in the process of making a quick machine which is hopefully still nice and light. It will be a 2005 YZ167 with the exhaust water injection as mentioned in the earlier posts. Here is how I am planning to do it, looking for some advice to see what other people with an engineer's mindset think. 1) I will be welding a bung onto the exhaust pipe right near the cylinder and attaching a very tiny nozzle (rated at 35cc / minute at 100psi pressure) I have the nozzles already 2) Will be using a small, high pressure electric motor. Same type of pump I am using on my turbo Honda civic for water injection only smaller. It is small enough to fit under the engine, strapped onto a skidplate, provides high pressure and requires 35 watts max 3) Running a YZ250 Carb (same 38mm, Powerjet disabled) so that I can use the TPS for a load parameter 4) Will be using an Arduino Nano to read the RPM as well as the TPS, and then create a map that uses pulse-width modulation to control the voltage at the pump, and therefore the pressure at the nozzles (basically high pressure at low rpms/high load and tapering off in the higher rpms) 5) Since I will need to power the arduino (which takes only a couple watts) and the pump which takes 35W I will need a stator that can handle that kind of power demand. Options are to use a Steahly stator meant to power headlights, or to somehow modify a WR250F stator to fit to this bike. Also a possibility to just have the stator rewound to suit the increased demand, although I'm not sure this is possible as there is limited space as it is and my guess would be more coils would be required for more power? Here is where it gets tricky 6) For the water reservoir I have 2 options, I can either section off part of the gas taken by modifying it considerably and allowing it to hold a small volume of water (my guess would be between 500mL and 1000mL) OR I can get a oversized high radiator for the left side, and then convert the right radiator into a water reservoir, however this may cause cooling issuses, I also may be able to get a heavier duty water pump to move the water faster to help with cooling. Definitely looking for some opinions here 7) Lastly I will be using a water-solenoid that will be switched when the RPM's get high enough that exhaust water injection is no longer necessary, the solenoid will direct the water flow to my other mini injector (again 35cc/min) in the intake tract. It will produce an extremely atomized most which will help to cool down the intake tract and give a few ponies in the upper RPM range as well as help with the possibility of knock or detonation. I've been reading about 2 strokes and have been reading that the excessive heat really limits them in the upper RPM range as the piston is firing with every other stroke, the heat never has a chance to "escape" so I'm hoping that the water can help with this. And I know that detonation is most likely to occur at peak torque which will be in the midrange but this will be when the exhaust water is spraying the hardest, and some of the water will be pushed back into the combustion chamber by the returning sound wave, so that should also help with detonation at this rpm range. I just got the 167cc motor and I have a few of the parts and the rest are soon to come. Yes the 167 is already quite fast but I want this thing to be blistering fast, faster than any small bore 2-stroke. Porting is set up for mid-top and I have the most mid-top combustion chamber I could find (FMF SST) which will provide power in the upper range and the water will help in the mid range so that this bike should have a very impressive powerband. Don't worry I am riding the bike for the rest of the season with the 167cc and won't be really diving into this until winter forces me to stop riding but that really is not far away now, we will have snow in the next month or two. Anybody familiar with creating maps using arduino or microcontrollers? Anyone have any suggestions for the water reservoir and if eliminating a will and depending on one oversized rad to provide all of the cooling? Don't forget that the water is considered "liquid intercooling", I guess I can really only find out through testing here. Any suggestions would be awesome, thanks guys
  10. YZ250F06

    Very High Idle 2006 YZ125

    rjpjnk, you were absolutely right, it was a matter of adjustment on the throttle cable. I can't believe I spent all of those hours trying everything else, thank you very much for your input!!
  11. YZ250F06

    Very High Idle 2006 YZ125

    Hey guys here is my issue: 2006 YZ125. Bike has been sitting all winter. Just got it running but it running extremely high idle. The idle screw does not change anything as even in its lowest position it is still idling high (I've turned it out all of the way with no luck). It idles a BIT lower when the air screw is COMPLETELY in, it should be about 1 turn and a half out though, if I'm correct. Still runs very high idle. I've aso double checked the head and base gaskets. Sounds like it could be a Crank seal, but I've taken off the ignition side and as it ran I sprayed it with carb cleaner inside the ignition because that should richen the mixture (by taking away the air getting sucked in and either having it sealed or bringing in some of the carb cleaner). Didn't make any difference. Checked the reeds, they're good. Carb is extremely clean as I took it apart twice and cleaned it trying to sort this issue. If anyone has ideas let me know, thanks!!
  12. Hey guys here is my issue: 2006 YZ125. Bike has been sitting all winter. Just got it running but it running extremely high idle. The idle screw does not change anything as even in its lowest position it is still idling high (I've turned it out all of the way with no luck). It idles a BIT lower when the air screw is COMPLETELY in, it should be about 1 turn and a half out though, if I'm correct. Still runs very high idle. I've aso double checked the head and base gaskets. Sounds like it could be a Crank seal, but I've taken off the ignition side and as it ran I sprayed it with carb cleaner inside the ignition because that should richen the mixture (by taking away the air getting sucked in and either having it sealed or bringing in some of the carb cleaner). Didn't make any difference. Checked the reeds, they're good. Carb is extremely clean as I took it apart twice and cleaned it trying to sort this issue. If anyone has ideas let me know, thanks!!
  13. YZ250F06

    PLEASE READ! YZ85 Bog at High RPM

    Its a 2004. I bought the bike in non-running condition. It's been doing this since I've stripped and rebuilt the motor.
  14. Please read all of what I have done before making suggestions. Bike bogs down hard at high rpm, just after hitting the powerband. Basics: - Changed gas to fresh 93 octane with 32-1 oil mix - changed spark plug - checked reeds (boyesen rad valve, reeds look good) - air filter is clean (not excessively oily, have also tried without air filter mounted) - Ignition side crank seal is definitely not leaking. Engine was stripped and inspected and all looked well including seals. Crank looks good. -New PIston Ring Jetting: - Tried moving the needle both up and down, after several trials tried the max needle positions both top and bottom. Nothing - Main jet is stck at 135. I have tried a 145, 142, 138, 135, and 130. Symptoms are almost exactly the same with most of these jets. Problem still occurs. Carburetor: - Cleaned out the carb. Took out the pilot and main and needle and sprayed thoroughly with brake cleaner. - Have a separate carburetor from another YZ85 and I tried to put that in after cleaning it, same issue. - Do not believe its a float problem, as I tried both carburetors. Electrical: - From the other bike, I swapped CDI, and coil. Problem still occurs. - Tried to crush the gap on the spark plug to 0.5mm to see if it was a weak ignition system. Did not help, made bike run worse. (New plug is now in bike with regular gap and runs as before). I have tried to run the bike with the silencer off, and it has just been repacked. Problem still occurs. I believe the stator is behind the flywheel? I have not yet tried to swap those out as I don't have a flywheel puller tool. It feels like I've tried just about everything. It sounds like fuel starvation. It sounds like the same sound as the bike running out of gas. Fuel is coming out of the petcock at a steady flow. Bike starts up FINE with no issue and runs well in the lower range of the RPM but once it hits powerband it chokes and dies. Even if I roll on the throttle very slowly and reach only quarter throttle and the powerband tries to kick in it chokes out, so I don't believe its a main jet issue. I could really use a suggestion. Thank you so much for reading all of this.
  15. YZ250F06

    Southwestern Ontario Riders

    I will probably start riding soon now that it is freakin 20 degrees outside also I PMed you highflyernick, ive got a few cylinders and bikes for sale
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