mad59son

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About mad59son

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    Indiana
  1. Good post...enjoyed reading it. I have been riding for nearly 30 years, but just this year started racing hare scrambles. I've done four now, finishing 1 lap, 1 lap, 5 laps, and 7 laps. I'm shooting for 10 laps this Saturday - weather is supposed to beautiful. I don't know where in OH you live, but there is a couple of HS series that take place in the Chilicothe area...I've been racing one of them with my son and it has been a blast. Their website is www.knockemstiffridgerunners.com.
  2. It's funny how motorcycles get in your blood and stay there. My wife and I both grew up on motorcycles and we've had our kids on our street bikes for 5 or 6 years now, so I guess they don't stand a chance of not being bitten by the bug. I can remember riding on the gas tank of my dad's dirtbikes and then later starting on my own when I was about 10 years old or so. Now, after 20 years of street bikes only, I've gotten back into dirtbikes to ride with my own 10 year old son. I bought a used XR400 and bought him a new TTR125 for Christmas and we've had a blast riding and have even raced a few harescrambles this spring. My 13 year old daughter doesn't show much interest in dirt riding, but is counting the days until she gets her license and can ride with us on the street. She's even taken a few test runs on my old CM400 automatic and calls it "her" bike already. I think I'm going to have to build a bigger garage as my collection of bikes is at 8 and apparently growing.
  3. Technically, when you stand up you are most likely not "lowering the center of gravity" of the bike/rider combo - especially if you have a somewhat "top heavy" build (not that I would know...). What you are doing is applying the load of your body to a point lower on the bike which, because it is less affected by the suspension at this point, actually allows you to maintain better traction and more efficiently affect the handling of the bike. Same principle with weighting the outside peg in a turn - this keeps the load applied more perpendicular to the ground, increasing traction. In theory, standing should allow for better control, regardless of the impact on the "center of gravity". In practice, I find it very tiring, which leads me to make mistakes out of fatigue. Bottom line is I would say stand if you can, sit if you must, but ride, ride, ride.
  4. I'm 37 and just last weekend raced my first race - a hare scramble in Ohio. About 30 minutes into it I was wishing I was in the shape that I was in when I was 27. That was the biggest thing for me - the realization of just how out of shape I am. Good motivation to improve on the physical fitness. I'd say if you're serious check into the GNCC or WORCS, depending on where you live...
  5. Does the "Urban Dictionary" have a reverse lookup feature? I'm just wondering if there's any way to find out what term the 15 year-olds are using these days to refer to an arrogant ****weed that thinks he has the right to determine what color someone else's bike should be or how/where/how often they should ride it...
  6. I'll second that. As the buyer of Dale's other '96 a couple of months ago, I have not been at all disappointed in the condition of the bike. Go for it, the combination of the XR400 reliability and a good maintenance history should mean lots of trouble-free riding for you.
  7. Just put these on my boy's 125 small-wheel and they went on easy and look good. I got the ones for minis and the regular sized shields. I think they were about $60 total.
  8. And, I might add, it runs pretty strong and starts with minimal effort. I just pulled it out of the garage after about 5 weeks of not even looking at it and it fired on the 4th or 5th kick (5*F outside). Shutting the petcock and letting the bike run the gas out of the carb before putting it up always makes for an easier start the next time, too.
  9. Just getting back into it myself after several years on street bikes only - I purchased a used XR400 here on TT and I can't imagine a better bike for getting back into woods riding. I'm about 6'-2" and 260# and it has no problem taking me anywhere I want to go.
  10. I've been riding dirt bikes since I was about 10 (38 now) and street bikes since I was about 15. I've had a few mishaps along the way - mostly my own fault - but I've never had a broken bone in my life. The good Lord has definitely protected me from my own stupidity on many occasions. I've actually lived long enough now to realize the importance of exercising better judgment, at least most of the time. The scary part of riding on the street is that I can do everything right, and still get whacked by a distracted driver. In that respect, I think riding in the dirt is infinitely safer, but I'll never give up riding on the street - I just enjoy it too much.
  11. Go for the XR400. I just got back into dirt bikes after nearly 20 years of riding on the street only. The XR400 is the most fun I've had on two wheels in a long time. At 6'-2" and 260lbs it has all the grunt necessary to haul my big butt anywhere I want to go. I don't think I'm fast enough for a CRF - the XR4 is verrrry forgiving. That's important for someone as rusty as myself...
  12. If Harley started making MX bikes tomorrow, it would probably be identical in terms of technology and quality to the late 70's model but with some gay name and an inflated price tag. I can see it now - twin shock, steel tank and fenders, drum brakes front and rear called the Arena Glide for the low, low price of $17,999. The bikes would suck, but just think how much jack they could make off of the black and orange MX gear...
  13. I hear there's a 14 year old in Cali that needs a ramp built to launch himself and his WR250 into orbit.......
  14. Go with the 125. I was in the exact same position with my 10 year old when looking for a bike as a Christmas present. I went with the 125 and by the time real riding season gets here in a couple of months and with the limited seat time between now and then, I think he'll be fine. He's taking to it rather quickly in the little bit of riding that we've been able to get in and his only previous riding experience was playing around in the yard on our old QA50.
  15. Tried to squeeze a little seat time in last night with my boy on his TTR125E and it turned into a long evening. First, the bike got to where it wouldn't upshift without me pulling as hard as I could on the lever by hand leaving him with only 1st gear. Almost back to the truck, but one sloppy hill climb short, the back wheel locked up. Looks like the chain was not properly engaging the front sprocket pinching it between the sprocket and rubber guide. I had to drive the master link out to free the wheel up, then muscle it (with the help of a tow strap and my XR400) up the hill back to the truck. Is it possible that the two issues are related? Had the factory sprocket cover on - does this cause problems with buildup that could have gotten between the chain and sprocket? Would I be better off to run without it? These were very muddy conditions. It got dark on me last night and I won't be able to look at it until this evening - any ideas? BTW, bike has less than 8 hours on it. I would estimate that we've run less than 2 full tanks of gas through it.