• Announcements

    • Bryan Bosch

      NEW SITE FEATURE   09/19/2017

      Checkout the ThumperTalk Photo Gallery! Share a single photo, create your own album, or just checkout what others have shared.

scottiedawg

Contributors
  • Content count

    106
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

131 Excellent

About scottiedawg

  • Rank
    TT Bronze Member

Contact Methods

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Peru
  • Interests
    I was created to enjoy this amazing planet and all it has to offer...I enjoy anything with a motor, outdoors, sports, and anything active. My family is priority, but its the best combination to do the things I love with those that I love.
  1. "While at Machu Picchu, one of the seven wonders of the world, Ryan was counting down the days for our dirtbike tour." Todd explained just moments before heading out on the trail. It's hard to look down upon the Andes as you fly into the Cusco valley, and not have your mind blown with the enormity and vastness of the terrain below the wings. If you are crazy passionate about dirtbikes, it's even more mind blowing to imagine riding it on two wheels. Todd and Ryan joined up with Scott Englund of MotoMission Peru for a custom three day hard enduro ride. The ride catered to their skill levels, journeyed across the type of terrain that the boys wanted to ride, and filled their minds with hundreds of unforgettable images of Peru. Each teetered on the edge of comfort as Scott managed to push them beyond their norms of riding in Colorado. The official tour video...Check it out! Toothbrush anyone? "There is something special about leading a father son duo into the back country." Englund said as he explained how his own father bred a bit of adventure in his own heart. "I get people from every corner of the planet. They are all awesome peeps, but to share this experience with Todd and Ryan, that's a thrill." Three days of exotic dirtbiking. Beginning at Englund's home, the trail begins just minutes from the garage. "No trailers, you'll see what I am talking about. You won't even have time to warm up before we hit the trail." Englund explained. What goes on inside of Motomission is nothing short of a dream. Scott has been running MotoMission Peru for a number of years. He is a social entrepreneur who gives 100% of the profits of the business to charity. His family is supported by a number of people and/or businesses who believe in his mission. Sponsors have supported MotoMission with equipment and gear. The marketing arm of the business are happy customers that tell others about the experience and share the included tour video via social media. Scott does what he loves to do. Riding dirtbikes, exploring new areas, cinematography, adventure, travel, serving others, business...It all fits his lifestyle. You can see it in his smile when he hands over the bike to you at the beginning of the tour. So many views! "I've got the coolest gig on the planet!" Englund states. "In my wildest of thoughts, I couldn't have dreamt up a better situation. I live here with my amazing family, all who ride, and I get to do what I love to do, while giving it all away." It's not all happy and easy. "It really sucks when you have to haul a bike out of a canyon in backpacks." recalled Englund of a time when a customer launched a bike off a ledge so steep and deep he couldn't see where the bike had landed. Good times with Dad! Todd and Ryan got the full package. Englund was able to lead the men into an unforgettable riding experience like they had never imagined. Beyond tired, they had to make it to the next town for the night. They rode a section that is typically a two day ride, all in the scope of one day and a little bit of night. "My hand is so tired I can't squeeze the clutch anymore." Ryan said as the cramping in his forearm curled up his hand. When it comes to an exotic dirt bike adventure, MotoMission Peru has the holeshot. With countless untouched routes, an epic landscape, and a personable and capable guide, you owe it to yourself to check out this little gem in the Andes. You can reach Scott at Scott@motomissionperu.com to find out more about tours and riding in the Andes. He is always ready to talk shop! Also, don't forget to "FOLLOW" this blog if you want to have access to MotoMission Peru's new posts and videos.
  2. Peru, has an astounding number of riders that will participate in the 2017 Red Bull Romaniacs hard enduro race. The final count is nine riders. Each has a training regimen that consists of various modes of mental and physical preparation as well as a keen focus on building the technical wherewithal that will increase the odds of reaching the finish. Two days of Romaniacs training on video...Check it out! One of the hazards... One of those riders, Joso Fatule, will be a contending force in Romania. Joso is the top hard enduro rider in Peru. He has participated in a Romaniacs before. He knows what he is up against. Joso asked me if he could come out and do a two day training ride in the Andes around Cusco, Peru. I obliged, as it sounded like a good time, with the exception of the suffering that might come as a result of pushing ourselves beyond our limits. We scheduled a date. It was on! Just another view... Joso arrived from Lima on one of the first flights in the morning on day one. We returned to the house, geared up, and headed out with no time to spare. The days ride would take us over a section of trail that has only been crossed on one motorcycle; mine. I knew just how the trail would beat us down. Yup, we're going down there! It certainly did. The trail is not impassible. However, after one's body is spent, there will be another 500 more obstacles to overcome. Relentless, physically exhausting, and seemingly no end in sight...It breaks down every bit of will to keep going. We forced ourselves into finishing. With no overnight gear, we either made it all the way, or chicken out and come back. Onward we pounded up the trail to reach the pass, or abra as we say in Spanish. The drop dead goal of reaching the abra was 3pm. If we couldn't reach it by 3, we would have to head back the way we came to return to the valley floor by nightfall. We arrived with 15 minutes to spare. On top of the pass...the view is usually better, trust me! Over the top and down into the valley on the other side. The views were incredible, and the ride was legendary. Not easy, but memorably fun. Our goal for the night was the Lares Hot Springs. It is a perfect place to finish a hard ride. Hotel, food, gas, and the sweetest hot springs to soak in after a tough ride. Rest for the weary. The second day would carry us up through another valley via a high speed ride filled with plenty of technical climbs, steep down hills, waterfalls, and views that would blow anyone's mind. We managed to play around in numerous areas where training could be had. Joso attempted to climb a moss covered section of rocks where the water cascaded down, attempted numerous short and technical climbs, side hill turning practice, and dropping off and down various obstacles. The day was very productive in being able to practice a number of varying types of terrain and obstacles that would be faced while in Romania. That was the point...TRAIN! Sweet! When it was all said and done, Joso, got on his plane exhausted and a bit more prepared to face a giant. I am honored to be able to help him prepare. Besides, it was a sweet couple of days of riding.
  3. Follow along for a great three day ride! I often receive the privilege to ride with people from all the corners of the globe. While living in Peru, one thing I notice is that very few Peruvians have ever ridden in the areas around Cusco where I live and ride. So when I get a chance to show some locals(Peruvians) some of the secrets of their country, I try to do it well. This is what its like to ride in the Andes of Peru...Check it out! I met up with the boys in the Sacred Valley on the first day. They told me that they wanted to make another attempt at the trail that we rode two years prior, but never even came close to finishing. It really doesn't matter where you are from, if you are a dirt biker and there is an unknown or impossible trail in front of you, you want to give it a shot...Maybe not everyone is like that, but most that I run with are. The First Day-The impossible trail These guys have seen and heard the stories of countless attempts to reach the end of this particular trail. I took a group of some of the best riders from Lima and they fell quite short from the end. I think somewhere in my language, I may have fostered a bit of competition between the guys from Lima and the guys from Arequipa. Sebastian kept asking me if the guys from Lima made it this far. Regardless, I am the only one that has reached the other end of the trail on a dirt bike and neither group has come close. I do look forward to the day when I can cross over and down the other side with another rider or two. Not sure when that will be, but hopefully soon. We started up the trail like a herd of deer. The route is super fun with every type of obstacle one could imagine, while taking breaks when someone got hung up. That means it was quite often. The trail was dry at first, then the rain came and put a little bit of extra difficulty in the path. Regardless, we all pounded through hundreds of obstacles in the first couple of hours. The trail is relatively short in distance, but time is another measure. The entire trail to the other end is 18 km or about 13 miles. My guess is that we completed about half before throwing in the towel. The constant struggle to keep your wheels on the ground and your sanity intact is not easy. Regardless, the day was a huge success. Smiles all around. Nobody with broken bones, only a few bike issues that we managed to deal with on the trail, and a bunch of sore fellas for the next day of riding. Day one...SUCCESS! Just getting started... Day two was also a trail that would challenge each of us. It was a trail that I have done a number of times, but this time was different. We went the reverse direction. I was sure it would make it more difficult, but how much? As we started up toward the couple of alpine lakes, we found ourselves exerting a lot more energy than we expected. The toll from the previous day may have had something to do with it. Day two was a loop, so the plan was to reach a certain point of no return and keep on going till we reached the place where we started. The weather was cooperative, the trail was formidable, and the good times were had by all. Little by little we made our way over and down to the valley, then up and over another to reach our destination. Check out the videos to see what it was like. Be careful, you might want to come down and join me for a ride after seeing the video...Here is my contact info- scott@motomissionperu.com. The final day on the Cresta overlooking Cusco With all that said, we finished the day, absolutely smoked. With one more day of riding to go, we made the plan to meet up for the final day. The guys wanted to ride a bit closer to the city of Cusco. I took them to one of my honey holes. The "CRESTA" I call it. The longest ridge ride that one can imagine. Its filled with nearly impossible hill climbs, drop offs, fast rhythmic sections, and views that are mostly missed due to concentrating on the trail in front of your tire. Another perfect day of riding. Finished off with a plate of local cuisine in the small Peruvian town of Ccorrau and said goodbye to my buds. I can't wait until they come back so we can give it another go on that impossible trail. Make sure to follow the blog to stay tuned for the next ride. Also, for more info about Motomission Peru and riding dirt bikes in the Andes of South America, check out our website at www.motomissionperu.com. Also feel free to reach me through TT at Scottiedawg. Stay tuned for the next one! Scottiedawg
  4. motomission peru

    Nope...Just added a couple to the fleet. They are a bit delicate for my multi-day tours, but really fun to ride.
  5. The official ride video...Make sure to watch in HD The day started by waking up in a lavish hotel room at the Aranwa Resort in Urubamba, Peru. I had a couple of hours to eat breakfast, gear up, and drive across the valley to another fine hotel to meet up with Imad. A month prior, I received an email inquiry about running a one day hard enduro tour. I was available for the dates, so I began discussing the options for the tour. What I found out was that Imad, who lives in Dubai, was vacationing with his wife. He had come up with a brilliant plan to offer a full day at the spa for his wife which in turn allowed him to take advantage of another type of "SPA." Brilliant! Normally, I begin the tours from our headquarters in Cusco, but in this case, I was able to accommodate by starting at Imad's hotel in Urubamba. This gave me an excuse to bring my entire family to the valley, put them up at a nice hotel complete with all the fixings, and combine it with a one day enduro ride that has kept a smile on my face for days. I hung out with my family when I was at the hotel, then snuck out for a ride with Imad, then returned to spend more time with the family. Perfect! A couple of happy fellas I arrived at the Tambo del Inca, one of the finest hotels in Urubamba. I unloaded the bikes, prepped the lunches, warmed everything up, then headed into the lobby to find Imad. There he was with his happy wife who was about to be pampered for an entire day at the spa. She couldn't have been more happy. Imad was stoked to be able to enjoy Peru on a dirt bike. A win-win in my book! His wife made sure that I was legitimate. She was a bit concerned about me bringing him back in one piece. She mentioned the fact that there are two young kids who have a special relationship with their dad. I also fit that scenario, so I piped in my story to appease his wife that it was indeed my plan to bring Imad back alive and in good condition. Within minutes, Imad and I found ourselves mounting up on the two Husqvarna TE 300's. The trail head, just a minute away from the hotel was screaming for us to come try her out. The trail started out with a daunting strip of tight rock walled single track that resembles a jungle tunnel. It wasn't raining at the time, but it was extremely wet from the rain the night before. Imad pounded out the section with a bit of wonder about whether or not the rest of the day would be similar. I think it scared him a bit. To his pleasant surprise, I explained that it's not all as difficult, but that we would face countless obstacles in the days ride...But not to worry, it would all be worth it. Just a little rocky section to play around on We continued to work our way up the canyon with a goal of reaching the lower lake. I figured it would be a worthy goal to reach the lake, have lunch, then work our way back down the valley. Along the way up, we encountered numerous switchbacks, rock gardens, open meadows, creeks, and many a wet alpaca poop pile. The ride was just what Imad had hoped for. As a guide, I never know how people will do with the altitude. It can be a butt-kicker for some, and for others, it hardly makes a difference. With Imad, he struggled with it at first, but somehow caught a second wind as we reached the bottom of the last big obstacle before the lake. It was a rocky staircase climb that typically wreaks havoc when its dry, but this time it was soaking wet. We had our work cut out for us. Like two mules, we worked up a good lather climbing up each of the rock steps. I made sure to tell Imad that the view would be worth it. Within a few minutes, he had the opportunity to agree with me. The view was just what Imad needed. In fact, he was so stoked about the view that he told me he wanted to try to reach the upper lake. We had plenty of time, so why not? Taking a break! The stakes go up on the route between the lakes. The terrain we saw below the first lake was only a warm up. Imad confirmed that he was indeed ready to give it a shot. Atta boy! The coolest part of the section is a waterfall that cascades down the mountain as the trail goes right through it. Check out the video if you want to see what I mean! We worked our way through the water, up a number of tight rocky switchbacks, and finally through a stand of scary red-barked trees where one would expect to find a creepy murderer with an axe. The ride is so fun that you forget the altitude. Just past the forest was the final climb before the upper lake. Imad was feeling his oats at this point. We crested the top to discover a sight to behold; The upper lake. It's absolute beauty. It was a perfect place to eat our lunch, take a million pictures and get ready to ride around the side of the lake to an untouched area where a dirt bike has never been. That is always a special treat that I can do for my customers. There are hundreds of places like that which can be explored on my tours. The upper lake never disappoints...well worth the effort! A bit of food and drink, then we mounted up and began a fun trials type of terrain complete with granite rock slabs, bright green grass, tons of mud, and views that continued to blow us away. We played around for a good hour until it was time to begin our descent to the bottom of the valley. Although it is the same trail, it seems like a different valley and route altogether. The downhill is sketchy. It's fast and rhythmic, but there are so many places to find yourself on your face. We experienced a couple of crashes, but coming down provides such a thrill...in fact, it's that type of thrill that keeps me riding. Pure smiles all the way down. A little ride through a waterfall We made it back to the hotel with nothing left in our tanks. No gas, nor energy. Completely smoked, but so satisfied! Another typical ride in the Andes of Peru! Make sure to check out the ride video to see what I am talking about. I can't wait to share another one next time around. Stay tuned and make sure to follow the blog so you can see the next post when it comes out. Until the next one, Scott Check out more of our hard enduro videos on our Youtube channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures.
  6. Here goes...I have been on Hondas for 20+ years, now I need to figure out how to fix things with my 2016 Husky TE 300. I was riding some technical rocky sections for most of a day. On the way back down the same rocky sections, my clutch lever went soft and had no disengagement at all. I had to keep it rolling or stall. It was not safe. I was on a tour so I didn't want to inconvenience my customer. I managed to make it most of the way down the hill where the feel of the clutch came back at about 50%. I could pull the lever and it would begin to disengage at almost touching the bars. Not ideal. This morning, no clutch disengagement. I opened up the clutch cover to check the plates and everything looks normal. Fluid is clean, plates are functioning as they should. However, when I pull the clutch lever, I can see that the plates are not moving at all. I am guessing my problem is on the other side at the hydraulic part of the system. Has anyone had any experience with this type of failure? Any ideas on what I should check or how I should check it?
  7. same symptoms that I had...replaced the brushes and back in business. Still going 2 years out.
  8. Not sure about you, but for me, there is something refreshing about starting a new year! However, when looking back on 2016, there were tons of great moments! It must be those moments that remind me that the future holds some more incredible adventures and more virgin trails! What's on your riding list for 2017? WARNING: Watching this may cost you a plane ticket to Peru Within walking distance to MotoMission headquarters... This is rainy season...12 months of great riding conditions Metaphorically speaking, virgin trails are something we all need to seek out. I am not suggesting you rip up any old growth hillside in a national park, but seek out something you have never done before. Stop talking about it and wishing you had made it happen. The world is too full of people that don't "DO." Whether its racing in the Dakar, Baja 1000, or that ADV ride across Canada, those opportunities will present themselves this year. Don't use safety as an excuse. Don't use money as an excuse. Don't use your job as an excuse. That is what they are...Excuses. People that "DO" don't use excuses. Practice your "DO" this year. Find something that scares the crap out of you and give it a whirl. In fact, grab your buddies and do it together. Odds are, they are in the same boat. The area I call the Golf Course... This past year, I had a group of guys join me on a ride. One of them was a buddy I had grown up with. He rounded up some unsuspecting fellas to join in on a crazy adventure. They came to Peru, one with limited riding experience, and joined me for four days in the back country of Peru. The video(Where the Sidewalk Ends) tells much of the story. Where The Sidewalk Ends- OFFICIAL TOUR VIDEO These guys stretched a "DO" muscle. They committed and finished a feat that most would never even try. Now, as they look for another adventure, most likely it will be a bit bigger and more crazy than the first. Start that process of working out your adventure muscle. People don't usually regret adventures. Bring your cameras! One option for adventure is to join me in Peru for an exotic ride through the Andes. If you have ever wanted to ride in a cool place that is beyond your usual, this is it. Peru offers virgin trails, no other dirtbikes, and views that never disappoint. I have included a few pics and a video for your viewing pleasure. This is 2017. Make it a good one! Scott is the owner/operator/guide of MotoMission Peru, a social enterprise in Cusco, Peru that supports local children's projects with 100% of the profits from its operations. Hard enduro is our specialty. We have a turnkey tour with everything you need to enjoy Peru on a dirtbike. Contact Scott if you want more information. Scott@motomissionperu.com Follow this blog, our Youtube channel at MotoMission Peru Adventure Dirtbike Tours, Facebook at MotoMission Peru, and our website at www.motomissionperu.com. Ride motos=Make smiles! Christmas Party at the Altivas Canas Children's project brought to you by MotoMission Peru and our customers.
  9. The rock garden awaits for your presence...Scott@motomissionperu for your ticket to the show!
  10. All you gotta do is sign up...Scott@motomissionperu.com...Send me a message and we can put together a sweet adventure!
  11. In my line of work, I run across moto enthusiasts from every corner of the planet. We all share the same passion which helps establish an instant connection. While living in Cusco, Peru, I find that the enduro crowd is quite limited. I can count the number of riders on one hand...That's coming from a city of 600,000 people. A little trouble getting over the water Sometimes clients come from closer areas. There is a large dirtbike community in Lima, the capital city of Peru. The population of the city is roughly 10 million people. Dirtbiking is big in Lima! In fact, the local dealers have facilities set up at the ride staging area complete with bike storage, maintenance program, lockers, showers, and any part or accessory you may need for your bike. The mechanics are ready to fix anything at moment's notice, and are happy to get to work as you dump off your dirty bike after a long days ride. It is a sweet setup. Not cheap, but sweet! Recently, a group of some of the top riders in Peru connected with me to guide them on a tour. I obliged and began the process of preparing for the ride. They told me they wanted to suffer. They had seen some of my videos that I posted to my Youtube channel and Facebook and wanted to take on my gnarliest route. Perfect! Suffering in Peru I confirmed that they in fact wanted one of the toughest of my options. I reiterated that I didn't think they would all make it. I explained that it had never been ridden expect by me. I told them it was not very long, but oh so technical. Needless to say it turned them on for the ride! They couldn't wait. Before they got here, I had the chance to do a little business with the group. As some of you may know, MotoMission Peru is a missional business. Our goal is profit, but with the final focus being on the children's projects we support with 100% of the profits. Because of the nature of how we do things, I made the pricing structure a bit different for this group. The group was large. In fact it was a group of thirteen riders. They each paid a guide fee as well as had another strange requirement. The guys were given the sizes and ages of two children who are part of the Altivas Canas Children's project. Each rider was required to bring pants and a shirt for two kids. The group was making custom shirts already for each of the guys, so they added the sizes for the kids, purchased the pants, and brought an enormous bag of clothes to make sure each kid had something new to wear. In addition, the entire guide fees were thrown into the mix to purchase school supplies and other essential items for the project. This is the one they coined Scotty's Staircase When it was all said and done, the ride was as much as they could handle. A few made it quite far along the trail. Nobody made it to the end. They all had a blast trying to conquer an almost impossible trail, debilitating altitude, and paralyzing fatigue. They returned home with huge smiles on their faces while leaving behind enough clothes to provide each of the kids a new outfit and a batch of supplies to restock the shelves of the project. Dirtbikers are good folks. It makes no different which part of the world you are from, there is a common theme with riders. They know how to chip in and make a difference. So good to be part of that community! Misery with a smile So now you can take a look at the ride. It was nothing short of spectacular. A good buttwhoopin' trail that made a few good men cry. Hope you enjoy the video. Stay tuned for the next one. Scottidawg Scott Englund is the owner operator of MotoMission Peru. They offer hard enduro tours through the Andes of Peru. 100% of the profits are used to support local social projects. If you are interested in booking a tour or want information about the mission, please contact us at Scott@motomissionperu.com. Feel free to follow our blog here on Thumpertalk or check out our Youtube channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures or our Facebook page at MotoMission Peru.
  12. The ride through the eyes of the camera... I found myself the other day at the base of a trail that quite frankly scared the crap out of me. I straddled my seat, both feet on the ground, motor idling, and my neck looking so far up, the back of my helmet hit the plastic drone case that I had strapped to my body. Video or it didn't happen, right? Well, you're in luck. Keep reading... The beginning of a perfect trail I was solo. My buddy Alex was with me for part of the day, but he had a major situation with his business that forced him to peel off. I figured the trail would kick my butt and send me home without reaching the destination. I, however, thought I could at least reach the trailhead, fly the drone up along the side of the mountain to see what I was facing. Being by myself, I can't take the chances that I would if I were riding with a group. Before you guys give me a hard time about riding solo, let me just say it is a stupid idea. I know that. I do it quite often because I have no other option. I live in a city of 700,000 people and I have one guy that will ride with me when he can. That's my good friend Alex. There are at best, 20 trail worthy dirt bikes in the entire city, and most are only used on an MX track. I ride solo, most of the time. I would rather not, but when I do, I find some crazy things. Some of the never ending switchbacks This day was no different. Alex and I ripped through an hour and forty-five minutes of the most rhythmic, flowing, and scenic single track that one could imagine. From Cusco to the Sacred Valley via walking routes and animal paths that peak out at 14k feet down to the valley floor at around 9k. Once there, Alex and I parted ways with the assurance that I would continue with caution and care and let him know that I was safe when I got home. Sounds like my mother! The afternoon was fading away. It was 2pm as I peered up the enormous mountainside. I could not see the top. It was thousands of feet in elevation above. There would be glaciers. The trail would pass through a number of climates in the next three and half miles. I would have to push my physical limits much further than I could imagine. I couldn't play it safe. I had to give it a go. With the beginning of the trail right in front of me, I started screaming at myself inside my helmet, "Git it Scotty!" Releasing the clutch and twisting the throttle, I began a journey to a place I should have never gone in the first place. I proceeded. Switchback after switchback, ledge after ledge, I trudged up the side of a monster. Within minutes I was looking down as if from an airplane window, peering onto the valley floor where I had recently commenced. I was an ace. I was riding like a champ. You guys know what I am talking about. It was my A game I brought with me on this ride. The switchbacks were gnarly, and each one that I railed just boosted my confidence. I kept telling myself, Just another corner and I will take a break. My goal was to reach the lake that I found on Google Earth that happens to be at 15,400ft and nestled in a glacier riddled alpine area. I was pretty sure that the trail would be impossible. I stared at this the whole way up the other side of the canyon After 30 or so switchbacks and a relentless climb that never went flat for a second, the trail entered a rocky outcropping and into a chute filled with another batch of switchbacks. I thought, I am pretty sure this is the end of the trail. I came across a sheer downhill section of six switchbacks that I could count by looking almost straight down the hillside. Risky! I got off the bike, hiked down to make sure it was doable on the down, but also possible to get up as I may have to come back the same way. There certainly were no other trails on this mountainside. I pumped myself up with some more screaming in my helmet, "You're a badass Scott! You got this!" Down I lunged with the first tightening of the triceps. Uphill uses other muscles. I was fresh, but scared out of my wits. I had committed and therefore had to continue. Turn after turn, my bike couldn't make the corners without giving me the feeling that the back wheel and fender would push me into the abyss. With not enough space for the front tire to be on the trail below and the back to be on the trail above without a ledge in between, I found myself carefully muscling my aluminum horse down the path. I reached the final turn. The steep rock met me face to face. I managed to wrestle the bike around so it was pointed somewhat in the right direction. Fully committed, I pulled the clutch and began racing down the face of the rock to the dirt trail below. Keep your eyes on the dirt. The ledge that would have swallowed my bike after the 1000 foot tumble would have screwed up my day. I made it. With my heart racing and my confidence boosted like a rocket, I took a drink of water, a few pictures, and pumped myself up for more. I remember looking back and thinking, I hope I can get up that later. Now let's get to the lake. I spent a good two hours navigating a three and a half mile trail. I was thrilled to be there. Alone, I couldn't have done it any other way. I am not sure my buddy could have made it up, nor wanted to. It was high risk. I hammered out another thirty to forty more switchbacks. Exhausted, I reached the height on the side of the mountain that had to be similar to the elevation of the lake. The trail went side hill and relatively the same level for a couple of hundred of yards. The rocks were brutal, but fun. The landscape greeted me with large granite slabs, altitude which turned my 450 into a 250, and a view that one has never seen from the saddle of a dirt bike. I had arrived. The lake stood there waiting for my arrival. Stoked! As I reached the vista of the lake, my excitement spiked as I could only imagine the drone shots I would capture from that vantage point. The sun is good, no wind, and about 45 minutes of time before I need to get down the mountain. This is going to be amazing. I love shooting video! I quickly set up a time lapse to begin running. I then turned my attention the assembling the drone. While hiding myself and my drone backpack from the field of view of the time lapse camera, I began putting the props on the bird. In the minute or so that it took for assembly of the drone, the sun disappeared, the wind picked up, and the sleet began tapping on the side of my helmet. I couldn't believe how fast the weather changed. I could no longer fly. I put it all back in the pack, sealed it up, and began to freeze. It was time to head down the mountain. I finished up a few things at the top, but couldn't get off the mountain fast enough. With little to no oxygen, a piercing wind, countless small rocks of ice hitting my cheeks through my helmet and goggles, and a bit of fear resurfacing about the gnarly giants I must face on the trail on the return, I began my descent. I still had my confidence. I rode well for a few minutes until I found myself in a sunny and dry calm, just off the high alpine plateau. I don't have much time, but I hauled this drone up here to shoot some vids, I am gonna give it a shot. I spent the next 15 minutes maximizing my time as a pilot and cinematographer and grabbing some cool images. The task of reaching the bottom before dark was still haunting me, so I packed up things and continued the descent. In what seemed like hundreds of switchbacks, I found myself facing the biggest of the giants. The rock wall that looked at me with daring eyes. It was waiting for me to return. I gandered at the lines available, chose to hit it hard, reach my rear tire up to a high point on the rock, then high side my bike and let it cling the stone by way of a hooked foot peg and or handlebar. Perfectly executed! I wasted little energy, caused no damage, and was ready to tackle the next monster. The ride back down to the trail head greeted me with a couple of falls, mostly because of my fatigue and the angle of the downhill switchbacks. I managed to reach the bottom of the trail with everything intact, hardly a drop of energy left, but a smile as wide as the Pacific Ocean. It was a perfect trail. I could not be more stoked to be able to reach my desired destination. Solo...Yeah, I would have rather shared it with a good riding buddy. I wasn't dealt those cards. I had this little obstacle in my way... What I was dealt was a winning hand. An amazing day with an amazing ride. I made it to the lake, busted out some new trails, and learned a lot about how to handle difficulty and fear. I made it home to be greeted with a hug from my wife and kids... the makings of a perfect day! The reason for testing out the route is that in one month, a group of some of the best riders in Peru will be joining me on a ride. I believe this is exactly what they want. Something so close to impossible. I cannot wait to share my new riding spot with the guys. Until next time, keep testing the impossible, Scottiedawg If you want to hear about all of the crazy trail tales from South America, follow the blog. You will be notified each time a new story is posted. Also, feel free to like us on Facebook at MotoMission Peru, and watch all of our videos on our YouTube Channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures.
  13. The official tour video...feel free to share it with your riding buddies! I have the privilege of surrounding myself with various levels of dirt riders from all corners of the globe. There is one thing that never gets exhausting for me...Pushing people deeper into a passion for dirt biking. Please enjoy this helmet cam riding video full of awesome trails & scenery from a recent tour in the Andes of Peru. A worthy reward! I recently finished up with a two day ride that took us into some incredible places. Curt was the name of my customer. He and I quickly hit it off. We both shared a lots of years of moto stories and crazy experiences. Curt has been around the block with dirtbikes. He has been racing for a lot of years, in a lot of areas, and knows a lot of people in the moto world. I never know what my customers will be like once we hit the trail. I was pleasantly surprised. Curt was no spring chicken. He was one of those guys that appeared to be ten years younger than his actual age. He rode like a beast, had the endurance of a mule, and was always happy as a clam. Curt and I started on a rhythmic ridgeline trail above the city of Cusco which finished a few hours later in Chinchero. We each consumed a half of a pollo a la brasa (rotisserie chicken-Peruvian style) for lunch , then finished off the day with an epic Inca trail leading down to the Sacred Valley and the Urubamba river below. The ride is just plain fun. With views spread throughout the length of the route, we took plenty of pictures and shared numbers of stories. The first day was perfect. The landscape behind the Sacred Valley Day two began with a world class trail that leads to an exotic location that only a hand full of people have ever seen from the seat of a motorcycle. All of them have been with me. Nobody else would have ever known to ride this trail. Leave it to MotoMission to take you places like this. The trail is not easy. It has its parts of rhythm and flow, but there are sections of rock stairs, loose bowling ball size rock, and switchbacks that sneak up and try to throw you off the route. Curt pounded through each obstacle with fervor. He impressed the heck out of me. Our goal was to reach a high mountain lake, eat a snack, then bomb down the same trail we had just climbed an hour before. When we reached the lake, I was surprised by Curts reaction. No apologies for the views! He glared out over the alpine lake, wind blowing off the water and into his face. With tears welling up and into his eyes, he turned and looked at me. He was in the midst of receiving his reward for the strugglesome ride, the physical exhaustion, and the hoards of fear he had to overcome to reach the prize. He made it. A couple of content fellas "Scott? Can I have a hug?" Curt asked with his arms spread wide. "I cannot thank you enough." I must admit, normally I get a high five or a fist bump. This time it was a deep hearted bro hug from an emotionally stirred enduro rider who had just upped the ante on the best riding day of his life. My goal...Reached! To say it was a great ride would be an understatement. Curt was smiling from ear to ear all the way back to headquarters. His deep passion for motos grew as a result of our two days of activities. That is what I call a successful tour. I cannot wait to do it again. Scottiedawg Scott Englund is the owner/guide of MotoMission Peru. The goal of Motomission Peru is to share our backyard with other dirtbike enthusiast that want an exotic enduro adventure in the Andes of Peru, South America. Our operation is a social enterprise which gives 100% of its profits back to the community in the form of financial support for a number of projects helping children and families. If you are interested in booking your next riding adventure with MotoMission, please contact Scott at scott@motomissionperu.com
  14. Jamie and Scott at the beginning of the adventure...Ready to roll! The official tour video...Check out the ride! I picked up Jamie at the airport. He was unfamiliar as I had never seen a picture nor had much else to go on but instinct. I do have some life experience in stereotyping people, so I mustered up my best and started from there. A new batch of people began pouring out of the airport exit. It must have been his flight. What would he look like? I knew he was Canadian. I knew he was in his twenties. I knew he was an avid dirtbiker. He was traveling alone. I must say that it was not hard to pick out the tall, long haired guy with a Troy Lee Designs moto hat and a backpack with the Canadian flag proudly flopping side to side. On top of the pass and taking in another view I waved him down, and the journey began. Jamie checked into his hotel, received a little tour of the downtown area of Cusco, then spent a couple of days acclimating to the altitude. Day one of the ride came. I picked up Jamie and headed to the international headquarters of MotoMission (better known as my house). We carefully packed for a four day journey through the back country of Peru. One certainly does not want to leave anything out, but the pack seems to fill too quickly. They said we couldn't make it Jamie had taken a hard crash just a few days before his arrival in Peru. He was back home goofing around doing wheelies and forgot to cover his brake and went down hard enough to where he walked with a heavy limp. He must have been in pain as he made mention about lightening up the planned ride from a super hard enduro to something more manageable just so he could see how he could manage the pain. Taking a little breather There is something that intrigues me about priorities and pain. I watch the pro motocross series and see those guys ride with major injuries. Four weeks out on broken bones, crushed vertabrae, punctured lungs; I cannot imagine the pain. What I can imagine and relate with, is the absolute thrill that we receive when we throw our leg over a motorcycle. That is what pushes us to keep on going despite the pain. We prioritize the elements of our lives in such a way to receive the most value. Pain lowers the value, but the thrill of ripping through the Andes was enough for Jamie to push forward. I was able to modify the route a bit. The first day was tough for Jamie and a bit too much foot work. Day two, we ended up riding all the way to the jungle and back into the Andes. It was a lot of dirt road, but it gave Jamie a good break from the hard enduro. Day three was an exploratory day. Jamie was feeling good, and kept pushing forward while we found and explored numerous virgin trails. We rode for an entire day on new stuff. Even I had not even run the trails. Pure exploration! What a thrill. Check out the video for a good run down of the tour. I like to put together a video of each adventure. It's a great way to show people about riding in Peru. And if that isn't enough, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube Channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures. There are a ton of cool ride vids on there. A happy fella! As we pounded out four full days of riding, I had some solid helmet time to think. That is where the pondering of our ride priorities idea hit me. I began to think about the times that I have ridden with a messed up back, knee, or elbow. I thought about the times in my life where I played baseball with a foot cast or my hand wrapped up for my opening tennis match of the season. We tend to have a little bit more in the "tank" so to speak, when a fun time is at stake. Riding a dirtbike is certainly one of those activities that many people love to do so much so that we overcome pain and discomfort for the thrill of the ride. I see it every Saturday in the ranks of the pros. I see it when I ride with my buddies. I saw it with Jamie. I know that I am involved in a special kind of sport when people are so willing to throw their leg over a bike. Makes me appreciate the times when the wheels are turning. Until the next one... Scottiedawg
  15. My Backyard-an official tour video of MotoMission Peru I remember when I first became hooked on dirt bikes. It was during a ride with Barry, one of my growin' up buddies. I rode his brothers Honda XR80 as I did my best to keep up. I recall being so far out of my comfort zone and the blood rushing thrill of that first ride. It didn't take long for the moto fire to start burning. In fact, I bought that bike. I paid $100 of which most was lunch money that I had saved by fasting. Ahhh, that feeling of a new passion... Nacho feeling his inner peace... And so it was with Nacho, my new moto pal. Just six months ago, he took his first lesson. He told himself that he needed to give dirt bikes a try for five lessons. If he liked it after that, he would give himself permission to buy a new bike. Nacho bought his bike and the adventure continued. He lives in Lima, the capital of Peru. They have some great riding there, but it does not compare to the majestic routes through the back country of the Andes. Lima is on the coast. They have amazing dunes and coastal mountains, but it ain't no Cusco! There is a big dirt bike community there. Due to a couple of mutual friends, Nacho found out about MotoMission and decided that he wanted to see some of his country that most from Lima never get a chance to see...The Andes in the Cusco region. It's always exciting to head out on another adventure We coordinated the dates and the rest of the details. Nacho wanted something fun, but not super extreme. I had just the idea...The Golf Course is what I call it. It's a landscape like dunes, but if you can imagine that the dunes were made of short and smooth grass. Ups and downs, some steep some not. Total freedom to ride without a trail and an area so big you don't do the same line twice. It's a paradise for any dirt bike lover, even the new ones like Nacho. We rode till our arms were ready to fall off. A million smiles and pictures. Nacho was exposed to another world. His passion reached a whole new realm. I find it a privilege to douse the moto passion flame of another with a bucket of 98 octane fuel. It thrills me to no end. Every time I go out on a tour, one of my goals is to make sure that each client loves dirt bikes more after being out with MotoMission. It's one of the ways I measure success. The views never stop As you all head out on your next ride, I would like to challenge you to make it a point to build up the passions of others. Share some knowledge with a young rider. Stop and help another rider on the trail. Take out different riders with you to your favorite riding spot. Bring new people into the sport. Make it enjoyable for them and you might find another riding buddy in the near future. I can't wait to see where Nacho's passion takes him in the next year! A happy camper! If you are interested in taking your passion for adventure to a new level, consider joining me for a mind bending enduro tour through the Andes of Peru. Space is limited, but there are many dates available in the coming months. Message me through Thumpertalk or email me at Scott@motomissionperu.com. I am always looking for another riding partner. Until next time, stay on the gas! Scottiedawg