Ditchdigger

Members
  • Content count

    50
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About Ditchdigger

  • Rank
    TT Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    England
  1. I had a problem with bleeding the rear calliper on my ZXR. Spent hours trying to get a firm pedal. It just wasn't happening. Until a friend of mine turned up and suggested taking the calliper off and holding it above the reservoir. We did this which then allowed the air to be pushed out through the elevated bleed nipple. Worked a treat!
  2. And down to cost no doubt. Plus gives you the chance to bling it up should you want to.
  3. Built a track on a little over 2 acres and it has a good variety of jumps, tabletop, step up, double and a couple of jumps out of the ground which we call 'bomb holes'. We have sloped and graded the bottom of the hole so the water flows away from the bottom of the jump and they have worked well for several years. The earth was then used for the landing ramp. What is surprising is how much your large pile of earth (Table Top etc.) will sink over a short period of time. No matter how much time you spend compressing it. We were lucky enough to have some earth brought in as well as scraping the surface off in places which does generate a huge amount of the brown stuff. Our track was built and developed over a period of several years. A bit trial and error at times we eventually after many alterations built a circuit that makes the best use of the land and has a real good flow to it. We mainly used a JCB for construction, but on occasion we got the use of a 16 tonne 360 track machine which made light work of whatever we wanted to build / move or change. This was by far the best bit of kit, and would have done the work in half the time, but we were in no particular rush and learnt a lot from what we did. Some jumps worked some didn't but that was half the fun, getting the test pilots to do their thing. Although a fairly tight circuit it is just under a mile in length. Not bad considering. On a circuit like this we found that putting berms on the majority of corners helped maintain overall speed around the circuit as a whole. We also made the circuit safe for inexperienced riders to ride. The jumps are built to allow you to progress and gain air time the faster you hit them or there is an alternative route around them if needed. Enjoy!
  4. Obviously thought his birthday suit would save him in the event of a nasty accident. That is just sick. I wonder if he'll wear something a little more suitable next time out on his bike. Hope he makes a full recovery.
  5. That would also be my guess. Had a GPZ600 some years ago do exactly the same thing, as it would spit the coolant out of radiator overflow when under pressure. I did try a new rad cap thinking that maybe it was faulty. Unfortunately it was the head gasket in this instance.
  6. Very well put. It's about time us brits had someone to cheer on. Show em how it's done Toseland. The sooner you get that 08 bike the better. You should be on a level playing field and not handicapped. Then we will see how good the rest of the field are!
  7. I second that! It's great to see stuff like this. Sadly I have nothing to contribute from this era, the closest thing I have would be some pics of my 1980's twin shock Suzuki SP370. Think I'll post them in 10 or 20 years......... maybe...........?
  8. Owned a DRZ400 although it was the E (Enduro) model. Much better all round than the the standard S - road biased version. Sold it and bought my WRF450. No contest. Loved the DRZ but just a little big and heavy generally speaking. Although it was easier to ride in the wetter and trickier conditions. It was more mellow than the Yam. But I wouldn't go back. Did all the free mods. as listed on here and re jetted. Still have a little work to do in this area but she does run well if not a little rich at the moment. Better that way than too lean. forgot to mention that mine is an 04 model, not the alley framed version. Over here in the UK a second hand bike like mine would go for around £3'000. Found this ad for from a dealer: Yamaha WR450F Price: £4,499.00 Year: 2007 Warranty: 24 months. Thats $8'913.41 dollars or 356'032.87 Rupees. I hope I have used the correct currency here. I can't see why you couldn't get one shipped out yourself. It has to be a cheaper option even when you have paid import duty and shipping fees. I'm sure you could get a quote from a shipping company if you were to give them the approx weight and tell them it would come in a crate aprox. 2m square. Import duty may be less dependant on how much you declare the bike is worth. Just a thought. Keep us posted. Would like to know how you get on.
  9. You could possibly check the clutch for wear by putting it into gear and holding the front brake whilst giving it a little throttle. If the clutch is ok it should stall the engine immediately. If it is slipping it won't and the engine will continue to rev. It should give you an indication either way. Otherwise follow the advice provided. It's all good. Just wonder if your geared correctly? May be worth checking what sprockets you should be running? Can anyone advise on this?
  10. Yep, that was very well saved - Respect! Haydon did something very similar on race day I think it was in the same place as Edwards during the final few laps whilst chasing the leaders.
  11. Have a WR450 which will also overheat if left running whilst standing. Like husqvarnarider said, your bike has no fan so relies on air flow through the rad to reduce engine temp. I definitely wouldn't let it idle for 20 mins. The coolant or expansion tank will bubble and fill up as the water expands. It will do this before chucking it out of its overflow pipe. Again it's not recommended to let this happen. It probably does smell of burning as the engine is so hot it is possibly scorching something in close proximity to it - cables / electrics / plastics. If it runs hot on the trails, it may be worth checking your jetting and fuel mixture. Running a bike too lean will cause it overheat prematurely.
  12. My brother broke or fractured his early last year. Can't be sure which. Anyway, he had a plaster cast on for several weeks and it as far as I know doesn't give him any trouble. He still rides plenty and builds house’s for a living - construction work. So I wouldn't give up hope. He's fine. Good luck with it.
  13. What ever you decide you will have to let us know how you got on. g owned a DRZ (E) model which I road registered I would say that is was far more comfortable to ride long distance than my WR. That said, no matter what your riding covering that kind of mileage is going to take its toll on you. Covered some 500 miles on my road bike crossing France, and your body takes a battering even with a decent fairing. Stopping for petrol and a bite to eat helps but its late on when your body and mental concentration may start to suffer. On an unfaired bike doing the kind of speeds your talking about it's going to be a very very long day. As quoted on here, do you really want to risk travelling all that distance on a bike you don't know the history of? Respect to you if you have to make this journey. Hope its a safe one.
  14. WR450 - 10/10 Grin Factor!
  15. I agree, this is a lot of fuss about nothing. As always in life there is always someone / thing that is bigger / better / faster blah blah blah........ The fact that you are out there and able to ride is what it's all about. I also had a drz400e and loved it. It was a little heavy for track work but that said I could still beat off some mx bikes / riders. I would then ride my bike home grinning from ear to ear. Have a wrf450 which is lighter but no where as smooth as that 400. Each to their own. Just remember it's not what you ride but how you ride it! Just ask the miss's!