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BasketCaseSensitive

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Everything posted by BasketCaseSensitive

  1. Aside from limited passenger room, these little cabover trucks would make a cool toyhauler. They also get reasonable fuel mileage considering that they are not all that aerodynamic. We see them come in with 600,000-700,000 miles all the time. The parts are fairly expensive, but it's rare that they need major component replacements if they are maintained. Some systems are a cakewalk to work on. Other systems, like the brakes, can be a challenge. Anyway, if anyone was considering one for purchase, I can probably answer your questions. Isuzu NPR Hino FA
  2. BasketCaseSensitive

    How do I turn off auto-formatting?

    Not sure if this is the right term for it. I want to respond to specific sentences, but I find it much easier to type the quote brackets. As of right now, I can't figure out how to parse out a phrase and respond to the different pieces separately.
  3. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    I answered DCOM's question in the truck talk forum at expeditersonline.com. If any of you have Isuzu or Hino questions, go there. I'm posting under a different screen name, but you'll find me.
  4. BasketCaseSensitive

    Screw Toyota and the Tacoma

    In this case, it was two transmissions, nearly every component of the front end, and two radiators.
  5. BasketCaseSensitive

    Screw Toyota and the Tacoma

    My uncle's lost a piston last year. The wrist pin bore had broken. 350k worth of abuse and missed oil changes. Not bad.
  6. BasketCaseSensitive

    Kawasaki KDX200 2004

    I like watching my friends get on it and injure themselves. Shouldn't have been drinkin', dumbasses!
  7. BasketCaseSensitive

    Kawasaki KDX200 (2004)

    0 comments

    I like watching my friends get on it and injure themselves. Shouldn't have been drinkin', dumbasses!
  8. BasketCaseSensitive

    2004 dodge 2500 axel shaft

    You can buy the axle, u-joint, and stub already assembled from NAPA. I ran into the same exact scenario as you. I hashed everything up because it was so rusted.
  9. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    Hell if I know. I work on commercial vehicles. Isuzu generally makes very good engines. If you don't need a diesel I'd consider something else. Problems with the dpf/scr system when out of warranty will be extraordinary in price.
  10. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    Check town square. I had a lament to share.
  11. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    Can't a guy take a six month break? For up to the minute real life answers on Hino trucks, go to expeditersonline dot com, you'll see a thread in the truck talk forum.
  12. BasketCaseSensitive

    Any GM 7.4 TBI wizards here?

    I wish they were all that easy.
  13. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    Yeah, its a little rough. One of the two roof mounting rods is missing and its edges are frayed. Usable though. The shop is in aylett, about 2.5 hours away from you. We've also got a pile of unmashed front bumpers. I'll pm you the number. Ask for the service manager, Sy. He knows that I talked to you about it.
  14. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    The first air dam is for a hino. This one is a universal Npr. http://i.imgur.com/VN8JpIeh.jpg The flasher is behind the kick panel, or behind / under the fuse box.
  15. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    http://imgur.com/Xw9h0pE
  16. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    Sorry Randy, the 4bt1 out back kicked a rod out of the block. The crank is in one piece, but you dont want it.If you DO want it for some reason, let me know. I doubt they want much, or anything fot it. Then again, chances are you live too far away for it to be worth the cost of shipping. I know more about hino than isuzu. There's a truck here with a 4BD2 in it, condition unknown. May or may not work.
  17. BasketCaseSensitive

    Any GM 7.4 TBI wizards here?

    What is the condition of the ignition system?
  18. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    JB Weld should fix that right up. I'll have to go rooting around out back and see if a 4BD1 is laying around somewhere. I don't think so, but I'll look. What would you like to know? If I don't know the answer, there are people I can ask.
  19. BasketCaseSensitive

    I work on Hino and Isuzu trucks. Ask me anything.

    I just noticed you're in VA. Where are you located? Seems to me there was an air deflector hanging around out back. I'll have to look. It may have been sold, but I'm not sure.
  20. The radiator cap won't come off? Does anyone know if they came with Dexcool, and if there's a correlation?
  21. While definitely more powerful than the 2.5, the 4.3 wins no points for being economical. You might run into some dexcool sludge too. Pretty common. Idk if these had those awful die cast heater hose disconnects, but if it does, and it leaks, you will break it off 100% of the time if you try to remove it. A kit exists to get the broken piece out and to clean up the threads. All replacements are steel and are available at any auto parts store.
  22. It's part of the same series. It looked very similar to this one.
  23. The Hardbody is excellent. Rust can be a factor. Parts are more expensive than on Rangers. Ones in PA are probably cancer ridden. 90's Rangers are tough as hell, especially the 2wd, 2.3 liter trucks. Expect rust in the cooling system, very common problem if coolant wasn't replaced regularly. They get bad enough to dissolve the water pump impeller. You'll never flush all the crap out of the cooling system. Flush it some, replace the radiator, good to go. The five speed trucks can be difficult to quickly get into gear from neutral. These manual transmissions take ATF. Gear oil makes it hard to get into gear and hard to shift in general. It's not uncommon to find gear oil in them. I like using Shell Transynd 295 ATF, it's one of the fluids recommended by Allison. Really makes them shift nice. Did this today to the neighbor's Ranger which was hard to get into gear. The clutch slave cylinder/release bearing is a one-piece unit that sits inside the bellhousing. If the slave cylinder starts leaking, you have to pull the trans to replace it. On the top of the trans, rear of the shift fork cover are three rubber plugs. Over time, they shrink and leak. They will leak so much that all of the trans fluid will come out, then it'll smoke all the guts. It's kind of hard to find used Ranger manual transmissions because of this. Otherwise, they last a long time. If you see these plugs leaking, remove them and replace with freeze plugs. Problem solved permanently. The 3.0 engine is pretty good, but the 4.0 can have issues, especially if the rust has shown up in the cooling system. The 4.0 will crack it's heads if it sees too many overheats from poor coolant flow. The mileage of the 2 V6's cant touch the 2.3 either. All of the 90's Ford Rangers, 2 and 4wd, have twin axle I-beam front suspension. Smooth enough ride, but weird handling characteristics and tire wear and wandering can be pronounced if it needs its bushings replaced. Replacing these bushings can suck major ass, but you seem relatively patient and crafty, so it shouldn't be that big a deal. My unicorn is a long bed 2wd Isuzu P'up diesel with a 5 speed. None will have survived PA's brutal road salt assault, as rust would dissolve the frame before the engine reached middle age. Not powerful, not fast, but you could load the ass down until tire sidewall flex was the only working suspension and then hold it to the floor on the interstate all day long without a hint of the first problem. Drove one from Richmond VA to Leicester MA and still had a quarter tank of fuel left.
  24. BasketCaseSensitive

    97GMC kelsey hayes ABS rear brake bleeding

    You'll be thrilled to know that on some cars now, you have to attach a computer to the car to retract the caliper pistons so the brake pads can be changed.
  25. BasketCaseSensitive

    97GMC kelsey hayes ABS rear brake bleeding

    This is copywrited material that I brazenly robbed from another website. KELSEY-HAYES 4WAL BLEEDING PROCEDURE Brakes can be bled in the usual way manually or with pressure or vacuum equipment. The wheel bleeding sequence is RR, LR, RF, LF. If a pressure bleeder is used, the combination valve must be held open. If the EHCU Modulator or accumulator have been replaced, or air has entered the ABS part of the system, the EHCU modulator will have to be bled using one of two special procedures: The preferred method is to cycle the ABS system using a factory scan tool or an aftermarket pro-level scan tool that has bi-directional capabilities so it can access the ABS system and cycle the pump and solenoids. A basic DIY scan tool that only reads codes and sensor data cannot do this. If you can't get your hands on the proper scan tool, you can use the following manual bleeding procedure: 1. First, bleed the entire brake system using a pressure bleeder or vacuum bleeder. Pumping the brake pedal also works but must be done carefully so air doesn't siphon back into the lines. Bleed the wheels in this order: Right Rear, Left Rear, Right Front, Left Front. 2. Once all the air is out of the master cylinder and brake lines (no bubbles in the clear plastic bleeder hose you have attached to each of the calipers or wheel cylinders), you can proceed to bleeding the ABS system. 3. Open the internal bleed screws on the modulator one quarter to a half-turn. These are the cap screws on either side of the modulator. Note: Some newer 4WAL systems do NOT have these bleed screws so you must use a scan tool to bleed the system or try loosening the brake lines to the modulator to vent air. 4. Connect special tools (such as Kent-Moore No. J39177) to hold open the high-pressure accumulator bleed valves. 5. Open the two bleeder screws at the BPMV and bleed the unit by forcing fluid through it with a pressure bleeder or by slowly pumping the brake pedal. Do NOT allow the master cylinder reservoir to run low (add brake fluid as needed during this procedure). 6. Bleed the wheels again as before: RR, LR, RF, LF 7. Tighten the modulator bleed screws and remove the tools from the high-pressure accumulators. 8. Turn the ignition on and start the engine. Press down firmly on the brake pedal several times. If the pedal does not feel firm, turn the engine off, pump the pedal to relieve residual pressure in the system, and bleed each of the four brakes as before to get rid of any air in the system. It's a pain to go through all of these steps, but if you do not and air is trapped in the ABS unit (or pump on applications that have a pump), it will eventually get into the lines and give you a soft pedal. In other words, if you're doing this in your driveway and it's cold outside, welcome to hell.
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