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Nordegg

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Posts posted by Nordegg


  1. Again, full respect to Dwight, but I've had 13-52 on my bike since 2003 and still have the same slider on. And yes, I actually do ride it!:thumbsup:

    It probably depends on the positioning of the rear wheel, as some people HAVE had an issue. I like the gearing for the riding I do; very tight mountain trails. I've never been much for fanning a clutch, so ability to pull from LOW speed is critical and I can still go as fast as I'd like even on a gravel road.

    If 14-52 doesn't feel low enough I wouldn't be afraid of 13-52, but do check the slider.


  2. Really with the right jetting the right amount of coolant, and not idling the bike you shouldn't overheat, fan or no fan. Have you re-jetted from the excessively lean stock set-up?

    Supposedly the restrictive exhaust makes the '07 EXC's run a bit hotter; I'm not a loud exhaust fan, but steps 1, 2 & 3 for me would be fix the jetting, set the coolant level correctly (barely covering the fins when level), and remove the highly restrictive reduced diameter internal pipe.

    I've never had a need for a fan or engine ice even with a highly restrictive rad guard.

    Good luck


  3. I don't know, do you want the lighter, faster, more reliable, better equipped bike or do you want the Honda?

    Of course you are asking on a KTM section, but even the magazines (who don't get a ton of advertising from KTM) say that the KTM 450 is one of the most bullet-proof dirt bikes out there. Expensive mods? Like what? The carb mods are the same as they use the same basic carb. Motor mods? The EXC 450 can be converted into a 510 with factory parts; that is a better mod than just about anything you can do to the Honda. Dirt Bike compared the new version of both bikes this month; read the article and buy the Orange bike.

    BTW: KTM parts are no more expensive on average than Honda parts, and availability depends on your dealer; KTM keeps lots of parts available.


  4. Last I heard when put on a scale the KTM is the lightest, in the specs it is the heaviest. KTM puts their REAL weight in the specs (GASP!). IMHO the KTM is also the most reliable, and my riding group has 3 CRF's and a WR to compare to. The WR seems pretty solid, but still feels considerably heavier; it didn't get much riding last year, so comparisons on reliability will have to wait. The CRFs are not UNRELIABLE, but seem to require more maintainance and that work is harder due to the @#$* aluminum frame being in the way of everything.

    Power seems comparable on all the brands to me, though they "hit" differently. They're all good bikes, really.


  5. Could be a couple of different things. If the puddle is deep enough that even the very bottom of the motor is submerged, then I would say it is the carb vents that are your problem. There are two that vent the float bowl, you just have to run one of them up high enough to let air in and your stall will disappear.

    If you are just splashing through a puddle, then it probably is your spark plug wire/cap. Doesn't take much water there to cause a stall. You can screw the wire in to the cap more, or replace it. Some people like to put dielectric grease in there to keep the water out. The drain hole filling or not wouldn't kill the spark if your wire was still making a good connection.

    Good Luck!


  6. Having both available to ride, I notice the difference. In the tricky mountain terrain we ride in, a "granny" gear is helpful and we gear them down to 13-52. We use logging roads to move from trail to trail and the EXC has as much speed as you'd ever want, the XC hits its limit in this situation. I'll say that the XC has more than enough speed for any trail, and frankly as much as you SHOULD use on gravel, too. I don't find the EXC too gappy, but for tight racing or sand where you need the RIGHT gear, the XC would be better.

    As far as I can tell we agree on the suspension.

    Travis or Dave Hopkins could give all of the potential for displacement increase, but the EXC (XC-W) starts with a longer stroke so for every bore increase it will have an advantage. With stroker kits (obviously) you can end up with the same motor.


  7. Ah, KTM's "alphabet soup" model line up strikes again. The 450EXC is a road legal long-stroke enduro bike. The 450XC-W (W for "wide ratio") is the same bike but without lights etc (and doesn't show up on the KTM usa website). The 450XC (a.k.a. 450XC-G) is a short stroke/big bore bike with different tranny and suspension.

    Very simple:foul:


  8. I'm going to mention that the 525XC and 450XC have some significant differences. The 525 is basically the old 525MXC and has a close ratio gear box and (I believe) very similar suspension to the EXC. The 450XC has a special "semi-close" ratio tranny (low 1st and 2nd, close ratio 3-6 gears), and fully adjustable suspension from the 450SX (but softer). The 525XC is primarily a desert racer, the 450XC was designed to be an agressive enduro that can go to an MX track. I think the comment about the 450XC being geared for MX true, but both desert racers and MX racers like close ratios (the final drive ratio is different by using different sprockets). For trail riding/enduro I like wide ratio boxes, but the 450XC is a pretty good compromise.


  9. If your seals leak all the time, you have a problem (and it isn't just the seal design). My '02 got a minor leak in my first year and before replacing them I decided to try cleaning out the seals. I ran some old film negetive along the sealing surface, pulling out loads of crap, which fixed the leak. On someone's advice I filled the seal retainer with waterproof grease and have been leak-free ever since. Annually (sometimes 2x/year) I clean the old grease and crud out of the retainer. Mis-aligned forks can also cause a leak, BTW. Loosen the lower fork mounts and bounce them up and down a little to re-align, (then remember to re-tighten:ride: ).

    Good Luck!


  10. I've had good luck with the JD needle kit, but it won't cure all ills. My bike was jetted correctly before I started, so the bottom end response was no different, but the mid-high range became MUCH stronger with the new needle. I also noticed an improvement by getting my accelerator pump squirt down to 1 second (with the "Honda" diaphragm). Not a huge difference, but instant throttle wheelies got easier. Both of the above changes improved my mileage, too.

    As far as I can tell the P-38 goes the wrong way for these bikes, giving you a bigger squirt of gas. That might help if you were initially lean, but if it is jetted correctly this accessory might CAUSE a (rich) bog. For bikes with a leak jet in the carb the P-38 could be okay.

    Good Luck!


  11. Yes, all HP numbers are open to question, but I think 2whlrcr covered it well in his post. Just because I've seen so many questions on this, I'll put down the numbers I've seen.

    250SXF 36.8 hp

    400EXC 37.5

    450EXC 44

    450XC 45.5

    450SX 50-52(?)

    525EXC 48

    525XC 48

    525SX 53

    Reasonable? Depends on the dyno etc etc etc.

    I'd never compare the SXF with the 400EXC (or XC-W) as I personally would never rev the little one enough to get its full hp. YMMV


  12. I guess the decision is through, congratulations on the new bike Rocco. I can't help but comment a bit on some of the misinformation in this thread, though. Linkless suspension is (or can be) still progressive; as the suspension moves through its arc the angle on the shock changes. If you engineer it correctly (and some argue KTM didn't to start with) it is BETTER than link suspension as it is more direct. KTMs used to have linkage and chose a route they believe is better. They have not proved their theory in Supercross, but for a small company with low rider budgets they own Enduro racing and represent very well in MX (in Europe and now in the "Lites" class).

    Nonetheless, have you ever read an ENDURO comparison where people complained about KTM suspension? The 400EXC and then 450EXC won the vast majority (virtually all) of the enduro shootouts I have read for five years. And please don't tell me you think tiny little KTM "bought" their reviews with advertising! Hilarious to suggest KTM popularity is purchased with corporate $, as many people on KTM sites complain endlessly that KTM provides no contingency $ to racers. All those privateers are spending those "extra" dollars on KTMs because they like the bikes.

    I've ridden both the new WRs and CRFx. Both great bikes but I like my Pumpkin better: YMMV


  13. Your water pump seal is leaking and needs to be replaced. The seal has coolant on one side, oil on the other and a leak path in the middle so a bad seal shows. Do a search here or on ktmtalk.com for instructions on how to do this common repair. The fix is relatively cheap and simple, but if you do it wrong you'll have to repeat it :thumbsup: . There is a member named Jeb on both websites that has a nice "how to" linked on the bottom of his posts :applause: .

    Good luck!


  14. I'm not really scared about the Honda 450's valves (unless you like the red line) but the transmission is a genuine issue. It seems that running extra oil in it might be a cheap and good solution, but that is unproven.

    Setting that aside, the EXC is lighter, has an extra gear, has a hydraulic clutch and nicer components. I don't think there is much to choose between the power if the two, which leaves the handling and suspension. These are personal preference items to some extent, by I prefer the handling of the EXC and the suspension of the CRFX.

    For similar prices I can't say I'd have any hesitation: go Orange. I was a Honda rider previously. For you, if you could ride both it would be ideal, but the 450EXC has proved to incredibly reliable everywhere and extremely competitive in Enduro racing.


  15. Another vote for the 400EXC. It will do anything but intimidate you. I do NOT think the DR400 is a better choice for a novice unless you're going to "dual sport" it. I switched from XR400 and XR250s and found the 400EXC better in all respects, other than frequency of maintenance. Note, not frequency of REPAIRS, just maintenance (setting valves & oil changes).

    I don't think you'll need to lower it once you have the "sag" set for your weight and the suspension works in. I'm 5'8 and haven't done any lowering and I ride very steep trails in the Rocky Mountains. The 400 EXC is lighter, better suspended, and more nimble than the DR or XR models. The power is very good, and comes on with no big "peaks" to surprise you. It will climb anything if you gear it correctly. The six speed transmission will allow you to make first gear a crawling gear and still allow you to go entirely too fast in 6th (I use 13-52 gearing).

    Finally, if you reach the point where you decide you want more power after a couple of years you can easily buy a 453 kit and turn the bike into the ideal trail machine :thumbsup: . After four years I still can't find any reason to trade in my Pumpkin. Another good website for KTM info is KTMtalk.com BTW.


  16. I have heard that the 250SXF comes with a float bowl with a leak jet, some models with it blocked, some with a leak jet installed. The 400, as far as I know has never had a stock leak jet.

    There is a reason for the Honda Diaphragm; the longer post in the middle yields a shorter squirt. A dual sport might be an application where a longer squirt is wanted, though. With lots of traction (pavement) the motor won't spin up as fast and might use a longer squirt. 3 seconds (roughly the stock EXC diaphragm) is a bit long for dirt applications though, so most find the shorter squirt from the "Honda" diaphragm better. With the leak jet equipped Hondas, ironically, many are going to a longer squirt.


  17. Chipben is correct. Just to clarify, the hose(s) you want to reroute is/are the ones that vent the float bowl. When you ride in water that submerges them the carb can't pull any gas in and you stall. In actuality the two hoses are a bit redundant, you only need one above water to vent the bowl. Some people like the airbox, others just reroute it under the gas tank: free easy fix.


  18. Try checking the gas cap, some have a little check valve that can stick and create a vacuum not allowing any gas in the float bowl. Failing that, bad float, plugged petcock...? You could unscrew the nut on the bottom of the float bowl after it stalls: no gas means you have a supply problem TO the carb. If you have lots of gas there it could be a plugged passage in the carb or a bad plug wire, bad coil etc. Check for spark by pulling the plug and grounding it.

    Good luck


  19. Hmmm, seems like a bit of mis-info going on. First, I suspect the 525XC is NOT the bike you want, the EXC is really a better choice unless you are a desert racer. The 525XC is NOT the same motor type as the 450XC, it is the same motor as the EXC (different tranny, same motor). Confusing? Yes.

    The KTM is very easy to work on, never worked on a Husky. Valves are a bit of a pain to check, very easy to adjust. Geared and jetted correctly the 525 exc will put out about as much power as you can use. I think the Husky is a shorter stroke motor, so it will probably spin up a little faster but calling the EXC an XR is funny!

    The linkless suspension seems to work better for everything but Supercross (it dominates is European MX and enduro racing worldwide). It is lighter, simpler, lower maintenance: the advantages swayed me towards KTM.

    Both Husky and KTM seem like really good bikes. I'd check out the dealers involved, the resale value, then hopefully ride the bikes and buy the one that I preferred :thumbsup: .


  20. These threads are always interesting to me. I have a 400EXC that I put a big bore kit into to make a 453. The 400 was great, the 453 is fantastic: better at everything. The 450EXC is a "long stoke 400" vs my "big bore 400": I'd be curious to ride the two back to back to feel the difference. Jeb owned a 400EXC then bought a 450EXC and felt zero difference in the "percieved weight". The 450XC is supposed to be a racier, "snappier" enduro motor, the 450EXC more torque and smoother, the 400EXC may fit between.

    MikeSD: I'm having real difficulty believing the 400EXC will feel lighter than your 450XC. You are looking at doing basically what I did in reverse (the 450XC is "big bore" like my 453). I can tell you that my bike did not feel ANY heavier after the change, just more responsive. What might be the difference is the lighter flywheel in the XC making the power more "on/off" vs the "smooth" action of a heavier flywheel. Swapping the flywheel might provide what you need, I can see you finding the 400 slightly disappointing after the 450XC. A 450XC with an EXC flywheel and lights would be MY perfect compromise, but KTM can't build every possible combination.


  21. I'm not sure but if I'm reading this correctly, but you've switched from an XR250 to a 450SX and are wondering about the stalling? If so, the gearing and flywheel/crank weight of the two could hardly be more different and stalling will remain an issue until you modify your riding style. I switched from an XR250 to an EXC and had a bit of an adjustment even with gearing and flywheel that are considerably closer.

    Even a 100% correctly running SX (or any other motoX bike) will stall a lot when ridden like an XR. You'd have to change the flywheel, crank, and gear the bike down hugely to get the stall resistance of an XR, the alternative is to learn to use the clutch more.


  22. Another vote for "you'll love it! :excuseme: ". I did the conversion a couple of years ago and couldn't believe the difference. Other than being lighter, better suspended, more torque, more mid-range, more top end, and an e-start they are pretty equal. I couldn't stop smiling for the first month of riding.

    Downsides? The seats are harder on the KTM, the kickstand sucks and uh... that is about it. Oh, the KTM will not last as long with zero maintenance as an XR; but do the proper maintenance and it WILL last just as well.


  23. The dribble is coolant getting past the water pump seal: it will need to be replaced. Jeb on this website (or KTMtalk.com) has very nice instructions on how to do this linked at the bottom of all of his postings, or you can just do a search under "water pump seal" and find them.

    A minor pain if you carefully follow the instructions, but more trouble if (like me) you short cut stuff and have to try it a couple of times :excuseme:

    Good Luck!

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