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2x1wheeler

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About 2x1wheeler

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    TT Bronze Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Jersey
  • Interests
    Riding of course! I'll spin laps on the moto track or take a nice day on the trail. As long as I'm on my bike or working on the bike, I am worry free, having the greatest day.

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  1. 2x1wheeler

    Acerbis X-Move 2.0 Boots

    Off-road riding is a technical test for protective gear; it must allow enough flexibility for rider movement, but also provide enough durability to protect in the event of the inevitable crash. For an off-road riding boot, the main aspects are ankle protection and the prevention of hyperflexion. Recently, I came across the newly released X-Move 2.0 hinged-style boot from Acerbis and after reading about them, I had to give a pair a shot. Product Overview Right out of the box you can tell that the X-Move 2.0 boots scream premium protection. Initially seen from their refined look, as you look closer, the features become more apparent. The nicely polished aluminum buckles function with an over-center attachment which are elegantly simple to use and really inspire confidence that they'll stay closed. The lowest buckle has an integrated ramp that doesn't allow passing brush to snag, potentially causing it to open. X-Move 2.0 build materials such as the full grain leather upper and the overall color scheme not only give a great look, but enough stiffness in just the right areas for abundant shin and calf protection. Acerbis seems to have covered all the key areas of the rider's lower leg and foot in the protection department. They feel "solid" in hand with the pair weighing in at just under 10lbs. Sizing Sliding into these boots for the first time proves to me that they are ready right out of the box. Sizing was true, fitting into a US10 (EU44) with enough room for the toes up through the calf (14"). Fellow riders with the same shoe size also echoed true sizing and comfort with no other protective gear in place (knee guards/braces). When combined with in-the-boot knee protection, the upper calf adjustment became a bit limited with a max opening of 18.5", something for you large calf riders to consider. Function & Performance The four aluminum buckles have a secure “snap” open and close feeling and no matter what conditions I rode, they stayed closed. I rode a number of trails with plenty of boot height brush to potentially snag on, but even when trying to see if I could get a buckle to open, I came up empty handed. This is a real plus for wooded trail riders like me. The top buckle doubles to secure a two piece protruding plastic shin guard which encompasses the front of the boot. I did find that on some rare occurrences, the overlapping two piece design of the inner portion had the ability to get caught on the frame when squeezing my CRF. Your mileage may vary with different bikes and/or riding styles. With the non-adjustable hinged design, it was easy to pivot my ankle into a position that felt natural for operation of foot controls, providing a positive, confidence inspiring riding experience. Despite several gritty, sandy terrain rides and wash downs with the garden hose, the hinge never became notchy feeling or bound-up. Also, short of dunking the entire boot under water, my feet stayed dry, even when hosing them down while wearing them during post ride clean-up. The sole of the Acerbis X-Move 2.0 is made from a super tough rubber material with a non-replaceable integrated foot peg bed that features a dimpled pattern. In most riding conditions, the boots stayed well planted on the foot pegs, but I noticed that rapid left to right weight transfers in the sitting position lead to an occasional slip off. While my foot pegs aren't factory bike sharp, the teeth points have been maintained with a file, so my conclusion is that the sole of the X-Move is on the hard side. On the plus side, I expect sole durability to be quite good, even for the frequent and aggressive rider. In terms of comfort, when the ride was over, my feet where just as comfortable as when they were slid into the boots, so long days in the saddle or multi-day riders shouldn't be a problem. Pros Ready to ride out of the box (no break-in). Hinged design offers excellent freedom of movement. Easy-to-adjust buckles that stay shut. Premium boot at a nice price point. Cons Hard sole trades a little traction for durability. Top of boot enclosure occasionally snagged on CRF twin-spar frame. My Bottom-line Overall, I am very pleased with the performance of the Acerbis X-Move 2.0 boot, both with their function and protection. Something that makes these boots excellent is their ability to work for many different riders; they have the function and flexibility for MX track riders, the durability for the frequent trail rider, and the all-day riding comfort for the dual sport/adventure rider. They are ready to go out of the box and when you look at their quality and features vs. the price, the X-Move 2.0 offers a lot of value. More @ https://acerbisusa.uberflip.com/i/771000-02-boots-2017
  2. 2x1wheeler

    Scott USA Prospect Goggle

    Eye protection is crucial to finishing a ride or race without a face full of roost or worse, eye damage. There are many goggle options out there, but most seem to offer the same or very similar features with just a different logo. However, Scott wanted to break the mold with its Prospect goggle, offering some rather unique features not seen before. So, we reached out to Scott to see if we could test out a pair and to share our experience with the TT community. Product Overview When pulling the Prospect goggles out of their box, it's clear that Scott wanted to make a statement with their design. The word that comes to mind is bold! The pre-installed mirrored lens (also comes w/ clear) is generously sized for a huge field of vision and it uses 4 tear-off pins for added stability. The theme of stability is further carried out in the unique outrigger strap design. Rather than a fixed, one-size-fits-all design, the outriggers pivot to create a firm, but very even seal against your face with any face shape or helmet. Finally, there's an innovative, tool-less lens locking system that secures the lens in place with pins that go through it vs. tradition designs where the lens in held in place only by a groove around the perimeter of the google frame. Initial impressions of this system show a firm engagement that will certainly remain tight in any riding conditions. Overall, these goggles feel solid and are in my opinion the best looking goggles out there. Product Performance I tested the Scott Prospect goggles on the local MX track, some trail riding, and I even ventured out onto the street to see how they handled speed. As soon as I slid them onto my helmet, I noticed that the lens size may limit the ability to utilize the included nose guard. I tried them on a few helmets, but all where a bit too tight with it in place. After removing the nose guard, the goggle fit my helmet's eye port perfectly. Time to ride! The pivoting outriggers had me wondering how they could make a difference, yet on a couple different helmets, I noticed how even the pressure was on my face; very comfortable and secure.The foam padding looks premium, feels plush, and did a good job letting fresh air in and the dusty air out. Time will tell, but I have no doubts that it will hold-up just fine during many sweaty riding hours. On completely sunny days, the mirrored lens is ideal. It reflects bright light away from your eyes, giving the world a slight blue tint, but offers good clarity. When riding in cloudy conditions or when the light is low (dusk), the clear lens would be more ideal. Both lens, regardless of temperature or humidity remained fog free. While we're talking about lens changes, simply said, it takes some getting used to. Even with some practice, I can't say that I found it to be any faster than typical googles. However, I will say that once in place, the lens is extra secure. Looking at the goggle strap, it is noticeably wider than any other goggle I've worn. It uses two wider strips of silicone grip vs. more traditional multiple thin beads. During a hard rain storm, the straps seemed to slip on my wet helmet when manipulating the goggles on my face. The strap never slipped completely off my helmet, just something that I noted. Pros - Bold styling. - Large field of vision. - Two lens included. - Outriggers make for a very comfy, secure fit. - No fogging. Cons - Lens changes take getting used it. - Strap could use more helmet grip in wet conditions My Bottom-line Overall, the Scott Prospect goggle impress me. The out-of-the-box versatility of including two lenses is appreciated. The bold, premium appearance is eye catching and they have the features to back up the looks. While the lens changing procedure isn't something that I'm totally sold on, the huge field of vision and even face pressure makes for a great goggle. I have a number of goggles in my bag to choose from and the Prospect is the first I'll reach for on my next ride.
  3. 2x1wheeler

    MSR Impact Polypropene Skid Plate

    When shopping for a skid plate, most riders will choose coverage and durability over pure aesthetics; it is a product meant to bash on after all. For trail and track riders alike, situations that include rocky roost or gliding the frame rails over a log or rock is simply unavoidable. For these riders, a full coverage “winged” skid plate is a good idea to prevent sometimes unfixable frame and/or costly engine component damage. I was attracted by the clean & simple looks of the MSR Impact Skid Plate, but intrigued that its made from injection molded plastic (polypropylene). I figured that it would be lightweight and possibly reflect less sound back to the rider (vs. aluminum), but wondered how well it would stand up to abuse? I bolted one on my 2012 Honda CRF250R and rode both MX and trails to see what was what. Initial Impressions/Observations At first glance, it's obvious that MSR Impact Skid Plates is very make/model specific, closely matching the unique contours of the bike's frame and engine. I can really appreciate the time taken by MSR to design a product that offers a fully smooth bottom, while incorporating winged sides to provide a higher level of protection not seen with the OEM fitted guards and in some competitive offerings. Coverage of the oil filter and water pump from the front (think roost) is solid and so are the frame rails and engine cases from the bottom (casing it, log crossings, etc...). I really couldn't find any aspect of my bike where I felt more coverage was needed; this gave me increased peace-of-mind to try new obstacles. Despite being a full coverage design, the MSR Impact Skid Plate comes in at light 1.12lbs. By comparison, an aluminum skid plate of similar coverage came in at 2.34lbs.; slightly over double. Not that you'll likely notice this difference out riding, but protection equal, I'll take the weight savings. Installation & Maintenance Installation takes no more than a minute; slide the integrated rear tab over the frame rails cross member and tighten up two stainless hex bolts (supplied) into an aluminum frame rail t-bracket. Everything lined up correctly, so no drama or profanity. No instructions were supplied, but since the install is stupid-simple, they really aren't needed IMHO. Performance On the track and trail, the MSR Impact Skid Plate pleasantly lacks the excessive and frankly annoying sound resonance that reflects back to the rider that is often found with aluminum skid plates. Personal preference for sure, but a definite plus for me. The skid plate is fitted with plenty of cooling and weight reducing holes, so it drains out water and thin mud pretty well. However, some of the thick, clumpy mud that I raced in tended to sit near the bottom and accumulated; not exactly the best for weight and cooling effects. If you ride in these conditions, might be a good idea to install some skid plate foam. Regardless, this is where the pitfalls of the MSR Impact Skid Plate end. Out of the trail, I found a few large obstacles to use the skid plate to pivot over. After a few good hits and slides over rocks and logs, it showed that the MSR Impact Skid Plate can take the beatings that most riders will give it. I gave it a good visual inspection afterwards and I didn't notice any deforming, cracking, or anything that looked worrisome. Yes, the material will gouge where an aluminum plate might scratch, but I don't believe that this will turn into any issues such as cracking for a very long time. The way that it looked after some tough hits gave me even more peace-of-mind about its durability. When the ride is over, I found it best to remove for washing as the weight reducing/cooling holes make it difficult to fully clean. Additionally, it needs to be removed for engine & transmission oil changes for my particular application. Typically, I would bash on a skid plate design for not offering a hole that lines up with the oil drain bolt. However, a combined time of 1.5 minutes was added to my oil change by removing and reinstalling the skid plate. To me, that is a nominal fault to an otherwise exceptional skid, yet the lack of this feature holds it back from perfection. Pros Easy on/off. Full coverage. Well crafted appearance. Lighter than aluminum; reflects less sound too. Cons Can accumulate, thick clumpy mud. Removal required for oil changes. Bottom-line Overall, I feel that the MSR Impact Skid Plate does its job very well. Several gouges underneath made it clear to me that this "plastic" skid plate can take a beating without cracking and/or bending. Its well-crafted, frame hugging design looks great and protected all my bike's vitals without concern. Less sound reflection to my ears was also welcomed and its light weight is a bonus. More @ http://msracing.com/...skid-plate.html
  4. 2x1wheeler

    American Kargo Turbo 2.0 Hydration Pack

    Anyone that has done a full day trail ride or even a multi-day adventure ride is aware of how important hydration can be to the performance of your body as well as enjoying the ride without feeling fatigued. Riders have many options to meet their hydration needs ranging from tossing water bottles into a backpack to hydration systems that have been fully designed around rider ergonomics. I prefer the latter and that's why I decided to try the American Kargo Turbo 2.0 Hydration Pack. Product Overview The overall look and feel of this pack shows the extensive design & engineering time that American Kargo (AK) put into their Turbo 2.0 pack. Throw the pack over your shoulders and it really drives this fact home. Instead of just feeling like more weight hanging off your back, it feels more "integrated" with your body and secure. Try one on and you'll fully understand. When it comes to the pack's general appearance, it was a hit or miss; a couple of fellow riders said that it looks similar to a child’s backpack from the rear. While I suppose that I can see that in its general shape, I don't look at it when I ride, so this doesn't bother me a bit. I think that the pack's colors & graphics look good and the Retroflect reflective panels add some extra visibility for low conditions. The Turbo 2.0 pack comes with six pockets ranging in size from the smaller side pockets to the 270 degree main compartment with enough room for trail side tools and misc. extra supplies such as a spare tube, clothes, lunch or even a second lunch from the riding buddy who thinks wearing a backpack will only slow him down. Each pocket has a generous, rubber tipped zipper pull making operation even with winter gloves a non-issue. There is a fleece lined pocket closest to the rider that offers some protection for more delicate items such as a phone or MP3 player as well as isolating the rider's body heat from the insulated bladder pocket. Adjustability for the Turbo 2.0 comes from a four-point, butterfly strap set-up (two at the top & two at the bottom) which allows for ideal positioning on the rider’s back. The amount of adjustability allows for enough slack to be fitted over most full shell chest protectors or cinched up, fitting right over your jersey. Performance The stand-out benefit of the American Kargo Turbo 2.0 hydration pack comes when you toss it on, buckle it up, and get it properly adjusted. The feeling of the way that the strap system holds the weight of a full 2 liter hydration bladder along with anything that you can cram in feels secure; dare I say even light? Back fatigue from wearing a backpack comes from the weight constantly being thrown around, turning a 15lb pack into something that feels much heavier. For this pack, that is not the case, offering the sensation of a four-point seat belt harness; secure and tight. When American Kargo claimed that the Turbo 2.0 was designed with the rider’s movement in mind, using their butterfly harness, they nailed it! When riding, the pack does not feel like its working against you. On rare occasion, I did experience minor neck chaffing, but only when the pack was loaded up heavy, really past my typical carrying load. But, with some trial and error adjustments, I was able to correct this. It was never to the point of feeling, "get this thing off me!". The Turbo 2.0 is a real joy to ride with especially on the longer rides! When it comes to the usable functionality of this pack, it offers a unique & noteworthy feature for securing the drinking hose. Instead of using plastic clips (AK says that these have a tendency to break) or loops, a single Velcro strap is used. It's wrapped around the hose and is secured to either the left or right side of the center chest buckle. I was a little skeptical about the ability to easily find the Velcro patches to attach the hose to while riding, but I found this position to be within my natural reach and very easy to use. So, not only is the design effective, it's simpler than clips and loops. Time will tell if the Velcro used holds up over time, but so far I have no doubts or issues with the hose staying where it was put, ready for my next drink. I wanted to explore the limits of the Turbo 2.0, using it during some of other activities that I enjoy that include hiking, mountain biking, and even some jogging. As expected, this pack is up for pretty much everything. When your adventure is over and it's time to clean up, AK incorporated a detachable hose that makes rising the bladder an easier task. If you've ever used a hydration pack without this feature, you know the annoyance of having route the hose & mouthpiece through the loops and pack itself to remove the bladder as well as the hose and mouthpiece swinging around in the sink. Pros Comfortable, even on long rides. Strap design mask's weight and controls movement. High quality build & materials. Can be used during all your outdoor activities. Cons Some neck chaffing when really loaded up. Hit/miss aesthetics. Bottom-line The American Kargo Turbo 2.0 hydration pack is well suited to the specific needs & demands of off-road motorcycles riders, dual sporters, and ADV riders, with enough flexibility built-in to work equally well for a much wider range of activities. I'm very pleased with this product and it's definitely one that will be along on all my adventures, on and off the bike.
  5. 2x1wheeler

    ACD Racing Parts Off-road Motorcycle Skid Plates

    One of the most vulnerable areas of your machine is going to be the engine cases. The material is simply not meant to take an impact from a flying rock or sliding over logs and in the event of a fatal hit, get out your checkbook. It's not going to be easy or cheap! ACD Racing offers an aluminum Skid-Plate for my 2012 CRF250R, so I took the opportunity they offered to test one out and share my impressions. Product Overview The ACD Racing Skid-Plate ships in a simple plastic bag with the single mounting location already bolted together, along with some foam frame rail padding. The plate has a bare aluminum finish, something that some will appreciate while others may not. But, it's a skid- plate; it's going to get bashed up, so the importance of the appearance/finish is up to you.The welds for the wings are near perfection and no rough edges are present throughout, adding to the impression of a well-built piece. The design of the rear mount to fit above the frame with no need for bolts is quite unique and very beneficial to the smoothness of the lower portion of the skid-plate. Something that I would have liked to see included in the kit is a piece of foam to be placed between the frame rails, reducing the amount of muck accumulating in this space. This is especially important for my application because the skid-plate does not have underside holes for debris to exit or a location for an oil drain plug. Installation Installation is fairly straight forward, only taking about five minutes using a 5mm allen wrench. Instructions are supposed to be supplied with the product, but mine were absent. But, a quick call to ACD Racing and they quickly emailed me what I needed. The only questionable step was the placement of the included foam padding. I placed it to fit anywhere the skid-plate would touch the frame rails to isolate any vibrations. For my application, I had to remove the stock oil filter guard for proper fitment. Performance With the skid-plate installed, I couple of key issues with the design become apparent. First (and most concerning) is with the removal of the stock CRF oil filter guard. Although plastic, it is meant to deflect possible damage away from the protruding oil filter housing. Unfortunately, this particular ACD Skid-Plate is not designed in a way (does not rise enough) to fully protect the oil filter area, leaving roughly 75% of that area exposed to potential hazards. The design also leaves an exposed area right behind the front tire where the two bottom frames rails hoop together into the single up right tube. However, on some of their other applications such as their skid-plate for the Kawasaki KX models, they are formed to fill all of those areas with the required protection, leaving the question of, "why not the CRF250R?" The conditions that the ACD Racing Skid-Plate was tested in was snowy and wet from the slowly melting snow. These conditions underscored my concerns regarding the low height of the skid-plate, allowing the front tire to sling mud up into the frame and on top of the skid-plate. When riding with the ACD Racing Skid-Plate, you forget that it is even installed. There is a lack of vibration noises that I've experienced with other winged skid-plates, something that I'll have to attribute to the frame rail isolation padding that is included. Also, after sliding over a couple of logs, the lack of lower mounting bolts to get hung up on or gnarled up, making removal more more difficult is appreciated. Pros Very solid design, yet minimal weight addition (3lbs.). Looks nice, especially the front cut out ACD logo. Smooth bottom means no snagging or mounting hardware damage. Quick, simple, & strong mounting system. Cons Not high enough for full frontal protection. Foam to prevent mud accumulation not included. Must be removed for an oil change. Bottom-line The ACD Racing Skid-Plate is simple and tough. The completely smooth lower section is a real benefit for riders that find themselves sliding over large logs or rocks. However, for those that ride at high speeds, where a fast moving rock could really ding up the front of the engine case or oil filter housing, the design might leave them feeling a little uneasy. Overall the design is solid and undoubtedly strong, I just wish that it was a more well rounded packaged in terms of the number of riding conditions that it was well suited for. With some design changes, it certainly could. More @ http://www.acdracing.us/
    The idea behind the On Any Sunday movies was to explain the feelings, passion and stories that many people share on their Sunday afternoons. It is quite special, as a long time On Any Sunday fan to see Dana Brown making the “Next Chapter” of what his father created. It just further shows the passion of motorcycles a father can pass down to their son as it was done in my family and many others. They captured the passion of motorcycles perfectly and had many of the staring riders explain it in a manner that the enthusiast can appreciate and allow the non-enthusiast to understand. That is a major bonus and what the intent was in the making of movie, and they nailed it. Although I can appreciate any form of riding, I felt the coverage of the Moto GP Honda Team over took the movie to add some drama to the movie. The Moto GP segment seemed to keep coming back and lost my interest, to cover a little more of the season made by the Honda Team. I felt the season coverage along with the segment of Riders for Health did not belong in the movie. The purpose is to capture the stories “On Any Sunday”. In general it was well put together and clearly captured what the two wheeled community has evolved into in that last several years. It is a movie I will continue to go back to, yet will have some segments that will get the fast forward button.
  6. 2x1wheeler

    Moose Racing Racing XCR Pants

    I think that two of the toughest choices that a dual sport rider must make is what tires to buy and what riding gear to wear. It's difficult to find a balance between warmth, weather protection, and heat management (ventilation & breathability). I found this struggle between either wearing not enough base layers and being very uncomfortable on the morning street ride to the trails, but being comfortable and cool when the speeds slowed down in the tight stuff. Or, doing the opposite and sweating it out for the day. Moose Racing recently released their latest XCR jacket & pants to its outerwear line-up with the goal of matching the versatility needs of the dual sport rider while not being as bulky (and expensive) as say their Monarch Pass products. This seemed to be what I was looking for. How It Works Moose intended the XCR jacket and pants to fill the gap that they had between their more adventure rider focused gear (Monarch Pass) and the more entry level (Expedition). It's made to get you to the trail dry and comfortable without being bulky and offers enough vents to maintain comfort even on the warmer spring days. Product Overview XCR Jacket The most important part of any safety equipment purchase is proper fit. Moose offers a sizing chart on their website and I used only the key measurements supplied to make my choice. The jacket is sized generously to fit over varying types of base layers and armor. I wear a typical shell type chest protector and at roughly 160lbs., a size large fit over my armor well. The material feels solid with extra abrasion resistance in areas like the elbows. All the vents contain a zipper garage to seal up those joint that much better. There is enough storage, with a map pocket at the upper chest, two lower pockets, fanny pack pocket, and two inner pockets. To really open up the temperature range for this jacket, the rear fanny pack pocket can be turned inside out, allowing the whole jacket to be stowed inside and worn (as a fanny pack). XCR Pants The first thing that I noticed with the pants was the length; the waist in my opinion did not match the length. At 5’10”, the pants were left quite baggy. This seemed troublesome until I strapped on knee guards/braces. This tighten them up around the boot, filling in the extra space nicely.The waist has additional material to prevent chafing and includes an integrated belt that offers three methods of adjustment. At the seat of the pant, there is extra reinforcement to provide the added durability needed in such an abrasive location. Moving down, both inner legs have a stitched leather protector from the bottom of the pant ti just above the knee. The pants contain two pockets with a zipper garage to keep out the elements, both with enough room for smaller items that you'll likely carry (GPS, phone, keys, camera) as well as two rear vents. Something to note about the pants, pictured on the Moose website is an elastic inner band gator. This was on the earlier prototype version and didn't make into production. Performance Getting into this gear can be a bit more time consuming when it is compared to your typical MX style gear. There are more adjustments needed to get the fit right and in my book,this is a good thing! The triple waist adjustment really opens up the ability wear the pants from just your riding underwear up to a base layer with insulation and knee guards. As you move down to the boot straps, Moose maintained the triple adjustment and used three wide Velcro straps to hold the pant securely around the boot. In my experience, the top strap was placed a little high to work with my MX boots and could pose even more of a problem with a lower cut adventure style boot, tightening around your leg rather than the boot to keep out water. The important strap is at the bottom to minimize water entry when blasting through puddles and the occasional foot dab at a stream crossing. It held securely, doing a good job at keeping my feet dry. Something that I really like is the double function of the leather on the inner legs. It protects from heat and also allows me to get a good grip when squeezing the tank and seat. The pockets work smoothly with minimal effort, even with a winter glove on thanks to an extra tag on the zippers. For me, smooth zipper function is an important part of wearing dual sport riding gear, getting to a map or GPS without having pull off a glove is great! Onto the jacket... Something unique, yet annoying is the magnetic closure on the main zipper. The magnets prefer to work against you when it comes to taking off the jacket by snapping shut when I wanted them open, such as when unzipping the jacket to remove it. But, not a deal breaker for me by any means.The double rain gutter closure over the main zipper closes up a major spot for wind penetration, aiding in warmth on street rides. On the trail, single track brush proved to be no match for the outer material. It never got snagged, so it never had a chance of ripping. When it comes to pockets, the stuff that you really need to keep safe should be stored in the inside pockets. The XCR jacket features a pocket specific to holding electronics that is water resistant and includes an integrated strap to secure your devices. The map pocket is placed in a natural location and can be found even with a helmet on that prevents the ability to look down past the chin guard. When the day gets warm and the jacket needs to come off, I found the ability to stow it away an excellent idea. It takes about 3-4 minutes to pack the jacket away to wear as a fanny pack. I found the strap to function better for attaching to my bike than for wearing as a fanny pack. Wearing both the jacket and pants offered wide temperature range to maintain comfort. On the high end of my testing (75 degrees), all vents closed and wearing just a riding jersey, the XCR gear provided plenty of wind resistance for the street and managed fairly well on the trail with open vents.But, at this temp, I was close to the point of stowing it. At 42 degrees with about 30 mph winds, the combo did an acceptable job on the street for a non-adventure/touring type gear. With a base layer and minor insulation, the wind eventually penetrated through my layers, yet the XCR jacket & pants provided the needed protection from the elements when the speeds slowed on the trail. Pros · Attractive styling. · Durable shell material. · Good value. · Wide functional temperature zone · Lots of adjustment for a good fit. Cons · Magnetic buttons on main zipper can be annoying. · Expect pants to be a little baggy if you are a shorter rider. Bottom-line Dual sport riding is growing in popularity and Moose was smart to design their XCR jacket & pants with these riders in mind. This gear does well when it comes to getting you to the trail in reasonable comfortable without being unnecessarily bulky for the trails, complicated to use or expensive. It isn't totally windproof, but Moose makes another set of gear for that environment. If your riding is slightly more focused towards the trail, but still includes some pavement pounding to get there, I believe that Moose XCR gear makes the decision on what to wear for a comfortable day on the bike much easier.
  7. 2x1wheeler

    Moose Racing XCR Jacket

    I think that two of the toughest choices that a dual sport rider must make is what tires to buy and what riding gear to wear. It's difficult to find a balance between warmth, weather protection, and heat management (ventilation & breathability). I found this struggle between either wearing not enough base layers and being very uncomfortable on the morning street ride to the trails, but being comfortable and cool when the speeds slowed down in the tight stuff. Or, doing the opposite and sweating it out for the day. Moose Racing recently released their latest XCR jacket & pants to its outerwear line-up with the goal of matching the versatility needs of the dual sport rider while not being as bulky (and expensive) as say their Monarch Pass products. This seemed to be what I was looking for. How It Works Moose intended the XCR jacket and pants to fill the gap that they had between their more adventure rider focused gear (Monarch Pass) and the more entry level (Expedition). It's made to get you to the trail dry and comfortable without being bulky and offers enough vents to maintain comfort even on the warmer spring days. Product Overview XCR Jacket The most important part of any safety equipment purchase is proper fit. Moose offers a sizing chart on their website and I used only the key measurements supplied to make my choice. The jacket is sized generously to fit over varying types of base layers and armor. I wear a typical shell type chest protector and at roughly 160lbs., a size large fit over my armor well. The material feels solid with extra abrasion resistance in areas like the elbows. All the vents contain a zipper garage to seal up those joint that much better. There is enough storage, with a map pocket at the upper chest, two lower pockets, fanny pack pocket, and two inner pockets. To really open up the temperature range for this jacket, the rear fanny pack pocket can be turned inside out, allowing the whole jacket to be stowed inside and worn (as a fanny pack). XCR Pants The first thing that I noticed with the pants was the length; the waist in my opinion did not match the length. At 5’10”, the pants were left quite baggy. This seemed troublesome until I strapped on knee guards/braces. This tighten them up around the boot, filling in the extra space nicely.The waist has additional material to prevent chafing and includes an integrated belt that offers three methods of adjustment. At the seat of the pant, there is extra reinforcement to provide the added durability needed in such an abrasive location. Moving down, both inner legs have a stitched leather protector from the bottom of the pant ti just above the knee. The pants contain two pockets with a zipper garage to keep out the elements, both with enough room for smaller items that you'll likely carry (GPS, phone, keys, camera) as well as two rear vents. Something to note about the pants, pictured on the Moose website is an elastic inner band gator. This was on the earlier prototype version and didn't make into production. Performance Getting into this gear can be a bit more time consuming when it is compared to your typical MX style gear. There are more adjustments needed to get the fit right and in my book,this is a good thing! The triple waist adjustment really opens up the ability wear the pants from just your riding underwear up to a base layer with insulation and knee guards. As you move down to the boot straps, Moose maintained the triple adjustment and used three wide Velcro straps to hold the pant securely around the boot. In my experience, the top strap was placed a little high to work with my MX boots and could pose even more of a problem with a lower cut adventure style boot, tightening around your leg rather than the boot to keep out water. The important strap is at the bottom to minimize water entry when blasting through puddles and the occasional foot dab at a stream crossing. It held securely, doing a good job at keeping my feet dry. Something that I really like is the double function of the leather on the inner legs. It protects from heat and also allows me to get a good grip when squeezing the tank and seat. The pockets work smoothly with minimal effort, even with a winter glove on thanks to an extra tag on the zippers. For me, smooth zipper function is an important part of wearing dual sport riding gear, getting to a map or GPS without having pull off a glove is great! Onto the jacket... Something unique, yet annoying is the magnetic closure on the main zipper. The magnets prefer to work against you when it comes to taking off the jacket by snapping shut when I wanted them open, such as when unzipping the jacket to remove it. But, not a deal breaker for me by any means.The double rain gutter closure over the main zipper closes up a major spot for wind penetration, aiding in warmth on street rides. On the trail, single track brush proved to be no match for the outer material. It never got snagged, so it never had a chance of ripping. When it comes to pockets, the stuff that you really need to keep safe should be stored in the inside pockets. The XCR jacket features a pocket specific to holding electronics that is water resistant and includes an integrated strap to secure your devices. The map pocket is placed in a natural location and can be found even with a helmet on that prevents the ability to look down past the chin guard. When the day gets warm and the jacket needs to come off, I found the ability to stow it away an excellent idea. It takes about 3-4 minutes to pack the jacket away to wear as a fanny pack. I found the strap to function better for attaching to my bike than for wearing as a fanny pack. Wearing both the jacket and pants offered wide temperature range to maintain comfort. On the high end of my testing (75 degrees), all vents closed and wearing just a riding jersey, the XCR gear provided plenty of wind resistance for the street and managed fairly well on the trail with open vents.But, at this temp, I was close to the point of stowing it. At 42 degrees with about 30 mph winds, the combo did an acceptable job on the street for a non-adventure/touring type gear. With a base layer and minor insulation, the wind eventually penetrated through my layers, yet the XCR jacket & pants provided the needed protection from the elements when the speeds slowed on the trail. Pros · Attractive styling. · Durable shell material. · Good value. · Wide functional temperature zone · Lots of adjustment for a good fit. Cons · Magnetic buttons on main zipper can be annoying. · Expect pants to be a little baggy if you are a shorter rider. Bottom-line Dual sport riding is growing in popularity and Moose was smart to design their XCR jacket & pants with these riders in mind. This gear does well when it comes to getting you to the trail in reasonable comfortable without being unnecessarily bulky for the trails, complicated to use or expensive. It isn't totally windproof, but Moose makes another set of gear for that environment. If your riding is slightly more focused towards the trail, but still includes some pavement pounding to get there, I believe that Moose XCR gear makes the decision on what to wear for a comfortable day on the bike much easier.
  8. 2x1wheeler

    Moto 6 The Movie

    The magic of Moto 6 is how pure the footage is. There are no flashy special effects to increase the “wow” factor of the film, simply capturing the rawness of phenomenal skill on a dirtbike. The current ability to capture the action of motocross in slow motion allows the audience to appreciate all that happens in this awesome sport. The format that has been used in the previous Moto movies is carried over into Moto 6 featuring segments from some of the most skilled riders in their sector of our sport. From moto riders that spin laps around the track to the free riders hopping around the mountains, Moto 6 features something everyone can enjoy and appreciate. Luckily if you have a short attention span like me, and cannot sit through a full length movie, Moto 6 is long enough to capture the beauty of our sport, yet not too long to interrupt our desire to hop on the bike as soon as the ending credits hit the screen. The creators that make the Moto movie series have done it again, and I know I will be hitting that play button more than once.
  9. 2x1wheeler

    Renthal Hot Start Kit for Gen2 Intellilever Clutch

    The best rides are the days where everything continues to work as it should. Having a vital part fail during a race or out on the trail is a quick way to end the day. Some of the most vulnerable parts are your handlebar controls. Some manufacturers have realized this and have put out their version of an "unbreakable" lever. I have experience using a number of levers that make this claim, but I always felt that they could do better in terms of feel and how they deal with impacts. This brought me to the Renthal Gen2 IntelliLever Clutch Assembly (w/ hot start) and Brake Lever. Renthal took a unique approach in taking on the unbreakable lever claim. How It Works In a crash, Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers attempt to eliminate bent or broken clutch & brake levers by using a dislocating joint that allows the lever to be pushed out of the way, in the direction of the force of impact. Its range of motion is a full 270 degrees in any direction, not just up, down, and forward. After the lever has been pushed out of the joint, it springs back into place, ready to continue. Product Overview Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers can be had as direct fit into your OEM perches, but there is a universal fit clutch assembly with hot start. Each product comes with everything that you'll need for installation, but you'll reuse your stock pivot bolts for direct fit levers. The dislocating joint is machined from aluminum and it has a great finish, providing a cosmetic upgrade for your ride. The lever used appears comparable to OEM in terms of its size and shape, providing a familiar feel. In hand, they feel like a quality pieces; very solid and good looking. Both levers come with a grey dust boot, but a black boot is optional. However, this option must be purchased separately for an additional cost. I preferred the black boots and think that buyers would appreciated having the color choice without having to spend more. Another optional add-on to the clutch perch is a hot start lever, which is placed below the handlebar, right at thumb’s reach. (Edit: According to Renthal, Black boots will become standard on all levers and the Grey will become optional by end of 2014) Renthal wanted to create a product that does not need the handlebar perch clamp to be run loose, using a plastic bushing, or any other home-brewed method to allow the lever to rotate on the handlebar. Even if this helps to reduce bent or broken levers, the rider still has to take the time to bang the control back into the right spot. Installation Since the magic of the IntelliLever is built into the lever itself, installation is just like swapping out an OEM lever. Common hand tools and knowledge will cover this job. The universal fit clutch perch comes pre-assembled, so the only work that you have is to tightening up the handlebar clamp and setting the clutch adjustment. I found the install instructions to be a little wordy for such a simple job, but they still get the job done. In addition to the written instructions, Renthal has an install video on YouTube. During the install, I noticed that the clutch adjuster wheel was getting snagged on something. When I disassembled the wheel, I could see that it was getting hung up on a square edge at the opening where the clutch cables runs through. At this price point, I'd like to have seen a rounder profile for smoother operation. If your bike is equipped with an electric start clutch safety switch, the IntelliLever universal fit clutch will not be able to retain that feature, as it is with most aftermarket clutch assemblies. The bike that I tested on is a 2006 Honda CRF250X. Before the levers were shipped to me, Renthal notified me of this issue to ensure that I was aware. Also, when considering this product, you will want to look at applications for the direct fit levers as they are specific to the listed bikes, which conveniently includes hydraulic clutch equipped KTM models. Performance Although Renthal IntelliLevers have a very unique design, they feel totally natural when riding. The details of the dislocating joint mechanism disappear from your mind until you take a spill. Lever pull feels just like OEM. Even the overall lever size/dimensions appears to match OEM, so no learning curve for me. Since you can run the handlebar perch clamp tight, it adds to the positive, solid feelof these levers. This was a positive for me. One of the more violent crashes that these levers took was a nose dive off a rocky creek waterfall. The levers did what they were designed to do; pushing themselves out of the way, remaining undamaged. After a few impacts, the levers got stuck in the up or down position, but with a quick bang of my fist, they popped back into place. They sit just out of the joint while still remaining horizontal and in easy reach. However, it takes about ten seconds to pull the lever horizontally out of the joint to properly set the lever. This does scratch up the finish on the lever a bit, but it's a dirt bike and far better than a broken control lever. Even if the lever was not perfectly set in the joint, it never prevented it from fully functioning. For the carb'd bike riders, the hot start was simple and effective. I very much prefer the under the handlebar location, keeping things less cluttered. The hot start lever is small and out of the way, but it still provides enough leverage to pull the cable. Unfortunately, adding the hot start onto the clutch perch can get pricey at an addition $59. Furthermore, on my application, the hot start would not bolt up to the stock perch (the holes do not line up), decreasing the versatility of the hot start. Pros Easy install. Natural feel. Levers look great and feel solid. Greatly reduces bent or broken levers. Able to tighten the bar clamp (no wasting time in a race, banging perch into place). Cons Dust boot option must be purchased separately. Sometimes levers do not spring back into place. Hot start only compatible with Renthal clutch perch. Bottom-line Renthal IntelliLevers feel great and I am pleased with them. The price is on the steep side, but competitive with other "unbreakable" levers and they will clearly outlast conventional levers. For the racer, the time saved using levers that likely won't break and spring back into place is crucial. For the off-road rider who uses wrap around style handguards, having a lever that is capable of deflecting both up and down is valuable because the handguard prevents more typical unbreakable levers that only flex forward from doing their job. I think that Renthal really improved upon the previously flawed idea of the unbreakable lever, adding a characteristic seen on very few other levers.
    The best rides are the days where everything continues to work as it should. Having a vital part fail during a race or out on the trail is a quick way to end the day. Some of the most vulnerable parts are your handlebar controls. Some manufacturers have realized this and have put out their version of an "unbreakable" lever. I have experience using a number of levers that make this claim, but I always felt that they could do better in terms of feel and how they deal with impacts. This brought me to the Renthal Gen2 IntelliLever Clutch Assembly (w/ hot start) and Brake Lever. Renthal took a unique approach in taking on the unbreakable lever claim. How It Works In a crash, Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers attempt to eliminate bent or broken clutch & brake levers by using a dislocating joint that allows the lever to be pushed out of the way, in the direction of the force of impact. Its range of motion is a full 270 degrees in any direction, not just up, down, and forward. After the lever has been pushed out of the joint, it springs back into place, ready to continue. Product Overview Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers can be had as direct fit into your OEM perches, but there is a universal fit clutch assembly with hot start. Each product comes with everything that you'll need for installation, but you'll reuse your stock pivot bolts for direct fit levers. The dislocating joint is machined from aluminum and it has a great finish, providing a cosmetic upgrade for your ride. The lever used appears comparable to OEM in terms of its size and shape, providing a familiar feel. In hand, they feel like a quality pieces; very solid and good looking. Both levers come with a grey dust boot, but a black boot is optional. However, this option must be purchased separately for an additional cost. I preferred the black boots and think that buyers would appreciated having the color choice without having to spend more. Another optional add-on to the clutch perch is a hot start lever, which is placed below the handlebar, right at thumb’s reach. (Edit: According to Renthal, Black boots will become standard on all levers and the Grey will become optional by end of 2014) Renthal wanted to create a product that does not need the handlebar perch clamp to be run loose, using a plastic bushing, or any other home-brewed method to allow the lever to rotate on the handlebar. Even if this helps to reduce bent or broken levers, the rider still has to take the time to bang the control back into the right spot. Installation Since the magic of the IntelliLever is built into the lever itself, installation is just like swapping out an OEM lever. Common hand tools and knowledge will cover this job. The universal fit clutch perch comes pre-assembled, so the only work that you have is to tightening up the handlebar clamp and setting the clutch adjustment. I found the install instructions to be a little wordy for such a simple job, but they still get the job done. In addition to the written instructions, Renthal has an install video on YouTube. During the install, I noticed that the clutch adjuster wheel was getting snagged on something. When I disassembled the wheel, I could see that it was getting hung up on a square edge at the opening where the clutch cables runs through. At this price point, I'd like to have seen a rounder profile for smoother operation. If your bike is equipped with an electric start clutch safety switch, the IntelliLever universal fit clutch will not be able to retain that feature, as it is with most aftermarket clutch assemblies. The bike that I tested on is a 2006 Honda CRF250X. Before the levers were shipped to me, Renthal notified me of this issue to ensure that I was aware. Also, when considering this product, you will want to look at applications for the direct fit levers as they are specific to the listed bikes, which conveniently includes hydraulic clutch equipped KTM models. Performance Although Renthal IntelliLevers have a very unique design, they feel totally natural when riding. The details of the dislocating joint mechanism disappear from your mind until you take a spill. Lever pull feels just like OEM. Even the overall lever size/dimensions appears to match OEM, so no learning curve for me. Since you can run the handlebar perch clamp tight, it adds to the positive, solid feelof these levers. This was a positive for me. One of the more violent crashes that these levers took was a nose dive off a rocky creek waterfall. The levers did what they were designed to do; pushing themselves out of the way, remaining undamaged. After a few impacts, the levers got stuck in the up or down position, but with a quick bang of my fist, they popped back into place. They sit just out of the joint while still remaining horizontal and in easy reach. However, it takes about ten seconds to pull the lever horizontally out of the joint to properly set the lever. This does scratch up the finish on the lever a bit, but it's a dirt bike and far better than a broken control lever. Even if the lever was not perfectly set in the joint, it never prevented it from fully functioning. For the carb'd bike riders, the hot start was simple and effective. I very much prefer the under the handlebar location, keeping things less cluttered. The hot start lever is small and out of the way, but it still provides enough leverage to pull the cable. Unfortunately, adding the hot start onto the clutch perch can get pricey at an addition $59. Furthermore, on my application, the hot start would not bolt up to the stock perch (the holes do not line up), decreasing the versatility of the hot start. Pros Easy install. Natural feel. Levers look great and feel solid. Greatly reduces bent or broken levers. Able to tighten the bar clamp (no wasting time in a race, banging perch into place). Cons Dust boot option must be purchased separately. Sometimes levers do not spring back into place. Hot start only compatible with Renthal clutch perch. Bottom-line Renthal IntelliLevers feel great and I am pleased with them. The price is on the steep side, but competitive with other "unbreakable" levers and they will clearly outlast conventional levers. For the racer, the time saved using levers that likely won't break and spring back into place is crucial. For the off-road rider who uses wrap around style handguards, having a lever that is capable of deflecting both up and down is valuable because the handguard prevents more typical unbreakable levers that only flex forward from doing their job. I think that Renthal really improved upon the previously flawed idea of the unbreakable lever, adding a characteristic seen on very few other levers.
  10. 2x1wheeler

    Renthal Gen2 Intellilever Brake Assembly

    The best rides are the days where everything continues to work as it should. Having a vital part fail during a race or out on the trail is a quick way to end the day. Some of the most vulnerable parts are your handlebar controls. Some manufacturers have realized this and have put out their version of an "unbreakable" lever. I have experience using a number of levers that make this claim, but I always felt that they could do better in terms of feel and how they deal with impacts. This brought me to the Renthal Gen2 IntelliLever Clutch Assembly (w/ hot start) and Brake Lever. Renthal took a unique approach in taking on the unbreakable lever claim. How It Works In a crash, Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers attempt to eliminate bent or broken clutch & brake levers by using a dislocating joint that allows the lever to be pushed out of the way, in the direction of the force of impact. Its range of motion is a full 270 degrees in any direction, not just up, down, and forward. After the lever has been pushed out of the joint, it springs back into place, ready to continue. Product Overview Renthal Gen 2 IntelliLevers can be had as direct fit into your OEM perches, but there is a universal fit clutch assembly with hot start. Each product comes with everything that you'll need for installation, but you'll reuse your stock pivot bolts for direct fit levers. The dislocating joint is machined from aluminum and it has a great finish, providing a cosmetic upgrade for your ride. The lever used appears comparable to OEM in terms of its size and shape, providing a familiar feel. In hand, they feel like a quality pieces; very solid and good looking. Both levers come with a grey dust boot, but a black boot is optional. However, this option must be purchased separately for an additional cost. I preferred the black boots and think that buyers would appreciated having the color choice without having to spend more. Another optional add-on to the clutch perch is a hot start lever, which is placed below the handlebar, right at thumb’s reach. (Edit: According to Renthal, Black boots will become standard on all levers and the Grey will become optional by end of 2014) Renthal wanted to create a product that does not need the handlebar perch clamp to be run loose, using a plastic bushing, or any other home-brewed method to allow the lever to rotate on the handlebar. Even if this helps to reduce bent or broken levers, the rider still has to take the time to bang the control back into the right spot. Installation Since the magic of the IntelliLever is built into the lever itself, installation is just like swapping out an OEM lever. Common hand tools and knowledge will cover this job. The universal fit clutch perch comes pre-assembled, so the only work that you have is to tightening up the handlebar clamp and setting the clutch adjustment. I found the install instructions to be a little wordy for such a simple job, but they still get the job done. In addition to the written instructions, Renthal has an install video on YouTube. During the install, I noticed that the clutch adjuster wheel was getting snagged on something. When I disassembled the wheel, I could see that it was getting hung up on a square edge at the opening where the clutch cables runs through. At this price point, I'd like to have seen a rounder profile for smoother operation. If your bike is equipped with an electric start clutch safety switch, the IntelliLever universal fit clutch will not be able to retain that feature, as it is with most aftermarket clutch assemblies. The bike that I tested on is a 2006 Honda CRF250X. Before the levers were shipped to me, Renthal notified me of this issue to ensure that I was aware. Also, when considering this product, you will want to look at applications for the direct fit levers as they are specific to the listed bikes, which conveniently includes hydraulic clutch equipped KTM models. Performance Although Renthal IntelliLevers have a very unique design, they feel totally natural when riding. The details of the dislocating joint mechanism disappear from your mind until you take a spill. Lever pull feels just like OEM. Even the overall lever size/dimensions appears to match OEM, so no learning curve for me. Since you can run the handlebar perch clamp tight, it adds to the positive, solid feelof these levers. This was a positive for me. One of the more violent crashes that these levers took was a nose dive off a rocky creek waterfall. The levers did what they were designed to do; pushing themselves out of the way, remaining undamaged. After a few impacts, the levers got stuck in the up or down position, but with a quick bang of my fist, they popped back into place. They sit just out of the joint while still remaining horizontal and in easy reach. However, it takes about ten seconds to pull the lever horizontally out of the joint to properly set the lever. This does scratch up the finish on the lever a bit, but it's a dirt bike and far better than a broken control lever. Even if the lever was not perfectly set in the joint, it never prevented it from fully functioning. For the carb'd bike riders, the hot start was simple and effective. I very much prefer the under the handlebar location, keeping things less cluttered. The hot start lever is small and out of the way, but it still provides enough leverage to pull the cable. Unfortunately, adding the hot start onto the clutch perch can get pricey at an addition $59. Furthermore, on my application, the hot start would not bolt up to the stock perch (the holes do not line up), decreasing the versatility of the hot start. Pros Easy install. Natural feel. Levers look great and feel solid. Greatly reduces bent or broken levers. Able to tighten the bar clamp (no wasting time in a race, banging perch into place). Cons Dust boot option must be purchased separately. Sometimes levers do not spring back into place. Hot start only compatible with Renthal clutch perch. Bottom-line Renthal IntelliLevers feel great and I am pleased with them. The price is on the steep side, but competitive with other "unbreakable" levers and they will clearly outlast conventional levers. For the racer, the time saved using levers that likely won't break and spring back into place is crucial. For the off-road rider who uses wrap around style handguards, having a lever that is capable of deflecting both up and down is valuable because the handguard prevents more typical unbreakable levers that only flex forward from doing their job. I think that Renthal really improved upon the previously flawed idea of the unbreakable lever, adding a characteristic seen on very few other levers.
  11. 2x1wheeler

    Anyone use Quick-Release Helmet Buckle?

    My father has experience with them, as he has neck problems from many years of riding and hurts to lift his head high to get a hand in there to un-do a D-ring. Even considering that the quick release is in the trash. It was worth just threading the D-Ring. But as it is with most riding gear some swear by it and some will leave it go.
  12. 2x1wheeler

    rocky mountain discount codes ?

    Still could use a code when available. Thanks all. Will pay it forward when able
  13. Pretty sure the area would be considered Hegins. However, the truck is no longer there. The area has since been taken over by heavy equipment and no more riding.
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