kx450f63

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About kx450f63

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    Male
  • Location
    West Virginia
  • Interests
    motorcycles, hunt, fish,
  1. I think you left out some details? Is there ruts or grooves on the face or is the face smooth? Is the face deteriorated at the launch point with holes? (Most moto guys will refer to the holes as kickers.) If there are ruts or kickers the technique will be much more advanced than if there is not holes or kickers. Without more info. my first thought is to turn the bars full right at the launch. Use the steering stop to help pull the bike in line in addition to using your right leg to pull the rear back in line. Basically scrub right, just with out the scrub. Do not try this until you completely understand the principle and have put many hours in practicing the technique on a safe jump.
  2. Among other remedies already stated you should also inspect the distance between the throw out bearing and pressure plate. My first guess is with the EBC plates that distance is too great, not allowing the clutch lever to fully disengage the the clutch stack.
  3. Well I have learned some things. The hole for the studs of a typical stud like used on a car is nothing more than a blind hole as if it was drilled with a drill bit and I now know it is and can be done that way. If one has access to a stud gun then some awesome studded tires can be done fairly inexpensive.
  4. Thanks for the link. The excelerator looks like a good option. I figured by the time I pay for the studs (grip studs), a new tire, and the time to install, a $200 tire makes goods sense to me. I think I'll try the tapcon method up front with a used tire.
  5. I'm assuming you didn't have the noise before the frame swap? My guess is you left something loose. Take however long you need to go over every nut and bolt on the bike.
  6. I would like to hear the experience of the guys out there who have done it. I played in the snow as a kid with tire screws on my 80's but have never done it on the current big bikes. For the last 6 winters we go and find the nearest indoor practice facilities and take a few trips down south to keep us tuned up. This year I would like to stud tires for 3 bikes and if I can avoid spending the money on trelleborgs that would be a bonus. I looking for advice from tried and true users to hopefully learn from your experience. Basically a little of "I tried this.... and it did not work"
  7. I'm pretty sure you can buy an e-service manual for less than $10. Sounds like a good investment if you are working a problem that involves setting the TPS. see link https://www.tradebit.com/filesharing.php/search/0/2013+rmz+250
  8. I would start with re-machining both mating surfaces.
  9. I'm guessing faulty tube. Your thought about parallel vs perpendicular is spot on. Think about what could cut it like that (perpendicular to the rim), almost nothing, unless your rim lock has right angles on it or you left the tube under the rim lock when you installed the tube.
  10. Two most likely causes: Big end connecting rod bearing and main bearings. Just because those are the two most likely causes doesn't mean there couldn't be something else happening. A knock warrants a complete dis-assembly and inspection unless of course the knock is detonation. Until it get's a thorough inspection every guess is just speculation.
  11. Call ride engineering. They make the bracket to attach to your steer stem.
  12. sounds to me like it has a bearing failing... just a guess of course. Let's hear it!
  13. Year, number of hours? Does it operate now as designed or is it broken and will not operate? Shifting up or down? Under heavy load or lite load? Even though they are called consent mess transmissions there are parts that need to disengage and engage. When that happens they can not fully engage and cause a grinding sound, usually between 3rd and 4th.
  14. http://www.keihincarbs.com/home.html Give them a call. I have not had to source one yet but you may be making your own.
  15. The point I was trying to get across about the PV leaking not being a problem has nothing to do with the PV being open or closed, rather when the exhaust port is covered or uncovered by the piston. When you do the psi test you most likely will have the piston down so transfer ports are open. Thus uncovering the exhaust port and allowing psi to be built in the PV area. When the piston moves up to cover the exhaust port very little psi is built in the PV area.