Gary Semics

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Gary Semics last won the day on April 21 2009

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About Gary Semics

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    TT MX Technique Expert

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ohio
  • Interests
    Working on my motocross track in Lisbon OH. Riding motos is still my favorite thing to do. I like training on my bicycle, running, lifting weights too. Like working on the computer, especially editing video. Love having leisure time with my family. It's all good. Life is good living the dream on the back 40.
  1. So, what’s more important, the front or rear brake?Watch this entire video and you will know for sure! Help us celebrate the launch of our new website with an ADDITIONAL 20% off all Techniques and Training DVDs and Value Packs. Or choose free shipping Worldwide. Discount codes are listed on the home page. Or choose our new Video On Demand (VOD) Streaming platform. Yes, watch all our content across all devices anywhere at any time. Easily find it all on the home page. Click the “Shop Now” button and begin improving your motocross riding skills!26 AMA Pro MX/SX Championships can't be wrong! https://youtu.be/k5u2lpG7B2o <iframe width="854" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k5u2lpG7B2o" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  2. So, what’s more important, the front or rear brake? Watch this entire video and you will know for sure! Help us celebrate the launch of our new website with an ADDITIONAL 20% off all Techniques and Training DVDs and Value Packs. Or choose free shipping Worldwide. Discount codes are listed on the home page. Or choose our new Video On Demand (VOD) Streaming platform. Yes, watch all our content across all devices anywhere at any time. Easily find it all on the home page. Click this “Shop Now” button and begin improving your motocross riding skills! 26 AMA Pro MX/SX Championships can't be wrong! https://youtu.be/k5u2lpG7B2o
  3. Anywhere below and up to the rev limiter. If you go into the rev limiter it's hard on the piston, rings and especially the valves.
  4. What's more important, the front or rear brake? Learn all 55 Absolute Techniques of Motocross. Order a DVD or Value Pack today. Most DVDs and all Value Packs are already on sale! Save up to 70% off with code; GSMXS30OFF
  5. With the 4 stroke, it's pretty much always in the power band, so to speak. On the 2 stroke the power band is more narrow and sensitive. Therefore, the 2 stroke can be more difficult to manage, not only when jumping but everywhere else, as well. You have to be a better rider to go fast on a 2 stroker!
  6. Starts are sort of like gun fighting. A gun fighter has to be quick on the draw but at the same time he has to be smooth and have a good aim in order to hit the target before the target hits him. In motocross you also have to be quick and at the same time you have to be smooth with your clutch and throttle control and your body movements. If you mess up at least you won’t get shot but you may get run over in the first corner. There are three important aspects of the start. The single most important aspect of the start is the clutch. Excellent clutch control is the key. The other two aspects are throttle control and body movements. Let’s look at each one separately and all the detailed techniques that go with them. Following are all the techniques that go into clutch control. You have to hold onto the grip and control the clutch independently. This is true for when you’re riding on the track as well, but for the start clutch control is even more important then when riding on the track. Therefore I teach using your three outside fingers on the clutch while you hold onto the grip with your index finger. This way your three outside fingers will allow you to have good strong clutch control while your index finger can pull your body position forward as you shoot out of the gate. If you didn’t use any fingers on the grip you couldn’t pull and hold yourself forward. Or if you only used one finger on the clutch you wouldn’t have good strong clutch control for a perfect start. If this is awkward you can use your first two fingers on the clutch. With your three outside fingers or first two fingers on the clutch pull the clutch in and select first or second gear. Then let the clutch out until it just starts to engage. Then pull it back in just the slightest bit under engagement. This is where you want to hold the clutch. This way it will begin to engage as soon as you start letting it out. With this clutch setting technique you will know that the bike is in gear and your clutch will be set and ready, not too far out and not too far in, but just right for the real thing hole shot. It’s very important to control the clutch all the way out. Don’t just start slipping it out then let it go. And don’t release the clutch in a jerky motion. When done correctly it’s just one controlled smooth release all the way out. You are pretty much holding the throttle in one position according to traction and feeding the power to the rear wheel with the clutch. You see, when you feed the power to the rear wheel with the clutch the response is instant. If you rely on the throttle the power has to go through the carburetor and the response at the rear wheel can be delayed and not as actuate. Even after you are pretty far out of the gate, if the front wheel starts to raise slip the clutch a bit to bring it back down. Control the clutch all the way out at all times during the start. While seated in the proper position, grab the handlebars with a lot of over grip. This is important so you can keep your upper body open and work from over the handlebars not behind them. This will allow you to get more of your body weight up and over the front of the bike enabling you to keep the front end down more effectively. This open body position will also give you better leverage for moving your body position from side to side across the handlebars, which will give you the control to keep the bike going straight out of the start. This body position will also give you better leverage factors between your body and the motorcycle. If you fail to do this and start with a low grip you will have less control. There are usually ruts behind and in front of the gate. Make sure you are lined up straight in the rut. If you are a little crocked or the rear wheel is not all the way down in the center of the rut you are going to get sideways and loose a lot of time right from the get go. It helps to prepare the rut before you set your bike in there. Kick the dirt around and make it smooth and packed. Build up a little ramp at the front of the rut where it meets the gate so you get better traction as you spin over the gate. If you want the entire scenario check out my Vol II DVD # 2 (How To Win Starts). It has all the starting techniques. See a free preview and order the DVD online.
  7. Learn all the most effective practice methods and strategies to make your seat time more fun and productive. Use this code to get up to 70% off all Technique and Training DVDs. GSMXS30OFF Here's the list of single and Value Pack DVDs.
  8. Don't let them tackle you...lol.
  9. You may want to order some of my Motocross Techniques DVDs/Streams and/or the Popular Motocross Practice Manual. Backed by time tested and proven techniques that get results fast! Helped riders win 26 AMA pro motocross and supercross championships, from McGrath to Villopoto!
  10. It's hard to tell from your video. You maybe interested in my Techniques DVDs, Streams or the popular Motocross Practice Manual!
  11. Sometimes the window of, should I send it or not is very slim. It comes down to, is it worth the risk??? What do you have to gain and what do you have to loose? How are you going to feel if you jump it or if you don't??? Once you have the skill, it's all mental!!!
  12. Attitude, focus on the good in it! You can always find something good about riding your dirt bike!!!
  13. Don't travel much for schools. Just NC and FL during the winter. Our main base is in the N East. We are an hour drive NW of Pittsburgh.
  14. You are most likely holding on too tight and trying to control the bike by holding the handlebars instead of balancing them with your body movements. More seat time will help but in the mean time it would be very beneficial to be practicing correctly. Here's some info regarding body positions and movements. If you're serious about improving you may want to considering buying my DVD or Stream mentioned and linked at the end of these tips. It’s better to keep your elbows up and out away from your sides because it gives you better leverage factors over the bike. Try this simple test to feel the difference. Sit on your bike and hold the handlebars with a low grip and low elbows. Then move your upper body back and forth as hard as you can, then do the same from side to side. Now grab the handlebars with a high over grip and high elbows. Perform the same two tests. Which way feels like you have more leverage over the bike? And keep in mind that factor multiplies when you standup. Another body position technique is sitting forward. The reason you want to sit forward is because you want to sit right over the pivot point of the bike, in the central location. This way if you lean your upper body forward you are putting more weight to the front of the pivot point, if you lean your upper body back you are putting more weight behind the pivot point. When you are sitting back too far (behind the pivot point) your weight will most likely stay behind the pivot point even when you lean forward. If you haven't been doing these and other body position techniques correctly they may not feel good to you at first but after you get used to them you’ll develop more control and therefore be able to ride better and faster. The correct Body Positions and Movements are definitely a ground floor foundation that needs to be perfected if you want to advance. It's so important that I started my new Volume 3 Technique DVD Series with all the techniques relating to Body Positions and Movements. If you haven't already purchased this DVD you can see a free preview and order the disc or Stream.
  15. Getting sideways off jumps when you don’t intend to is 9 times out of 10 because you’re hitting an uneven face upon take off. Think of a quad when it jumps off an uneven face; like where the two left wheels are higher than the two right wheels, your going to get sideways big time. It’s the same kind of an affect with a M/C. If there is a rut, a dished out area, a little rock or anything uneven about the place where the tires actually leave the ground it’s going to make you go sideways. The best way to solve this problem and keep your short clean is to make sure you take off in the center of the rut or dished out area, make sure you’re taking off on even ground. If there is no even ground you have to compensate for the sideways pitch. The other possibility is that one foot peg is being weighted more then the other. This is explained in visual detail on my Volume 3 Series DVD # 6 "Motocross Basic Jumping Techniques". You can see a free preview and/or order the DVD or Stream.