climb8000meters

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About climb8000meters

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    Colorado
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    Kids, hunting, fishing, skiing
  1. It could be a rheumatological problem like rheumatoid arthritis, reactive arthritis etc. You should go see a rheumatologist.
  2. I stumbled upon the answer as to why a myometectomy wouldn't be the total answer. Myometectomy gets rid of the symptoms but does not decrease the risk of sudden death. Beta blockers and AICD decrease the risk of sudden death.
  3. Dr Mark is right! You will heal so much faster and with more long term power with surgery. Fly to Texas and see a real sports orthopedic surgeon! Be aggressive, in the mean time the splint at night on or off won't make any difference. Use the sling during the day to take the weight of the arm off the shoulder.
  4. I just bought a spare cr125 motor for $250. I am going to rebuild it, top and bottom end. Anyone know how to re-gear it for more low end grunt in the second and third gears for trail riding? Any other advise on the rebuild would be helpful.
  5. Perfect then you will live forever, one fast Honda! I have a Honda too! I agree completely with your Cardiologists on their recommendations.
  6. Online doctorate degree in typing and deep fried technology!
  7. Davbracas, you would opt for a septal myomectomy. Wow. You are brave. Bypass machine, sternotomy, no thanks. I think a less invasive approach would be alcohol septal ablation. The risk for complete heart block is the same. Newer techniques with less alcohol seem to be less risky. To really answer the question for onefasthonda the location and thickness of the septal hypertrophy needs to be defined. Onefasthonda, are you on beta blockers for this as well as the AICD?
  8. What was the outcome on this one?
  9. This is really a neat story. Our ortho guys seems to plate the tib fib more often, is that because it is easier, quicker...why?
  10. spelling: EVS
  11. I was re-reading my smart ass post regarding femur fractures and knee braces and contemplating...so for the average weekend warrior/amateur who is riding single track and doing very little jumping, or low height jumping, it would seem that the risk to knee would be greater than the risk of femur fracture. I would suspect that the majority of riders would fit into this category. Perhaps this would be the best candidate class to recommend asterisk, evo, etc knee braces. Your thoughts based upon you research. Also, was Trey Cannard wearing a brace with the 1st and recurrent femur fractures? Anyone know?
  12. Smart and important, hmmmm....no just a doctor that likes to help sick people. Smart ass, sure, I will give you that one. Hospitalist/critical care medicine. I have treated many, many trauma patients. In fact I have a patient right now who has a bolt in her head with a bad bleed in the right temporal lobe of her brain from a dirt bike accident in the ICU. Not a resident. I have been practicing for 11 years. My motivation for being here is that I love, truely love, dirt bikes, Supercross, Motocross, Endurocross and MotoGP, I happen to me a doc and that is it. I enjoy debate and controversy. I believe it motivates all of us to think harder and promotes the advancement of medicine.
  13. I understand that not all patients with PE have pain with deep inspiration: pleuritic pain. But, this person has it. I would not ignore that symptom. Hospitalist/Critical Care
  14. Davbrucus your statement on the d dimer is correct regarding that if the test is negative then it would not be helpful, but if it the test was positive then I would want to rule out P.E. as a cause of his pain with deep inspiration (pleuritic pain). Sure this is most likely a musculoskeletal problem but there are no absolutes in venous thromboembolism. A positive d dimer can persist for months after a DVT or PE even without evidence of a thrombus. In fact a persistently high d dimer even with no clot is an indication to extend anticoagulation therapy. From his narrative I can not discern the timeline on the pain with deep inspiration. Pleuritic pain is in my experience a very helpful symptom when thinking about pulmonary embolism. Missing the diagnosis of the cause of the musculoskeletal pain would be unfortunate, missing a potentially fatal thrombus would less than ideal. Nonetheless, PE is low on the list that is why I listed it second to last.
  15. drain plug