DarylInAjax

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About DarylInAjax

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    Ontario
  1. Good list. I would like to add: #5: Countershaft spline! (For those of you still running with the original countershaft, I hope you swapped the sprocket over to the XRR one!) #6: Valve stem seals harden & leak I replaced the shifter spring as a precaution when I did the countershaft (valve seals too), so hopefully won't have to split the cases again for a good long while...
  2. I just wanted to say a big THANK YOU to ElDorado and Brian and everyone else for the advice and tips. I got the bike on the road a couple of weeks ago, ElDorado's replacement countershaft went in without any problems. Same for the shift return spring. Had an issue with getting the oil pump primed so had to pressurize the oil tank to about 8 PSI to get it working. Once I was sure everything was OK I fired it up...started instantly! Lots of grins here. I'll have to put it away soon for the winter but I'll be ready to ride as soon as the snow melts. Thanks again everyone. Cheers, Daryl Ajax, ON
  3. UPDATE: Thanks for the tips everyone. I was putting this off till I got the engine ready to install in the frame... I used Brian's trick and flattened the face of an old 17mm deep socket and used a propane torch to heat up the fitting (not enough to blister the paint fortunately) and gave a sharp pull with my big breaker bar. There was a big screech and the fitting broke loose, nice and (relatively) easy. Laying the frame on it's side made a big difference too as I could get more leverage. The thread on the plug is pretty rough for the first couple of turns and the corners of the 17mm head are rounded. I suspect the PO partially cross-threaded it and maybe used a 12-point wrench in previous attempts to remove it. I'll be ordering a new one and using some anti-seize on the replacement so hopefully this won't happen again. With any luck I'll have my bike back on the road before the weekend! Thanks again guys! Daryl
  4. Hi All, I'm slowly getting my engine back together after having replaced the infamous countershaft and with any luck I'll have it back together before the snow flies but have run into a problem. The oil strainer fitting at the bottom of the oil tank is thoroughly seized. After marinating the fitting in penetrating fluid and using basic hand tools I got nowhere so I resorted to my air impact gun (275 foot pounds of torque) which did nothing other than make a lot of noise. The fitting did not budge. The PO must have used serious amounts of torque when he screwed that baby on... I do have a 3½-foot breaker bar (nicknamed "The Bitch" because for better or worse she always gets her way...) I could still try but the odds of shearing the fitting off are very high. Any suggestions? Also, if anyone DID ever shear that fitting of, how did you fix it? Cheers, Daryl
  5. Thanks Brian & ME! That's it exactly. It's Part#10 on ME's list. The sleeve must have stuck in the crankcase hole and came out when I was futzing with separating the two halves. This is my first time splitting the case so am taking it very slow and careful, obviously not careful enough... Once again Thumpertalk shows to be an awesome forum! Thanks again, Daryl
  6. Hi All, This is a question for anyone who's good at ID'ing internal engine parts...I've got a '95 XR650L. I was the midst of separating the crankcase tonight (replacing the infamous worn out countershaft) and while in the process of trying to get the two halves apart I noticed what looks like a small shiny spacer or sleeve underneath the engine case. Whenever I do a job like this I clear and clean my workbench of everything so I am absolutely certain it came off the engine and not somewhere else. What I can tell you is that I found it AFTER I removed the gearshift cam and BEFORE I physically split the cases. I thought it may have come from the gearshift cam but all parts are accounted for. I then thought was that it's the collar from the lower camchain tensioner where it bolts to the crankcase but that's not it, I've got that sleeve already. So...where did this little sleeve come from?
  7. Nice to see the new XRL keeping with tradition. As long as they keep the changes to BNG & color I'm happy. At least they didn't try swapping in a dual-clutch transmission! Speaking of which, anybody try riding a DCT-equipped bike yet? I don't know why Honda hasn't killed this idea...I took a NC700X with DCT on a test ride and it sucked. I LIKE changing gears and is one of the reasons I like to ride. Having a button instead of a gearshift was weird...I don't think I would ever get used to it. If I want a scooter-esque transmission I'll buy a scooter.
  8. Just ordered one of those for my XR650L, got it from the Thumpertalk store using their Price Match for $64...nice! I've not tried one of these before and am looking forward to fewer adjustments. What do you use to lube the chain and how often? I'm "old school" and have been using 90-weight gear oil for years with great results but am getting a bit tired of the mess. I found most chain lubes too sticky and attracted so much grit they probably wore the chain out faster, hence the switch to gear oil. It's been a long time since I've bought chain lube so am hoping things have progressed a bit from the "sticky oil" days. Apologies for the off-topic post! Daryl
  9. being in the midst of a countershaft replacement job on my XR650L I feel your pain... I don't know of anyone that makes a thicker countershaft sprocket for your bike but...you could always have a machine shop cut down a second sprocket and weld it to the side of a new one. That way you'll have double the contact area. You may be able to donate your old sprocket to the project as long as the spline mating surface is in good shape. Not sure if your countershaft spline is long enough...you may also have to have the "donor" sprocket thinned as well. Measure twice, cut (or weld) once! My $0.02...
  10. Awesome! Thanks for helping me out. The countershaft was a surprise so had not budgeted for it so every bit helps. I'll definitely be paying this forward.... I'm amazed at how good your part looks given it's got 15K on it. I'm at 20K mileage and mine is destroyed. Installing the XRR sprocket seems like a no-brainer...if anybody needs proof look no further. Cheers, Daryl
  11. PM Sent! Thanks tons for the offer, hugely appreciated! Thanks also for the tip on the flywheel, sounds like I can leave most of the left hand side of the crankcase alone (including the cover, nice!). Cheers, Daryl
  12. Well…this sucks… After the base-gasket blew out on my ’95 XR650L I took the top-end apart and just got everything back from the shop for a general refresh, all the bits look shiny new! I was planning on installing a new chain & sprockets this fall but since the bike was sitting I figured I would do it now. Lucky for me I haven't started reassembling the top end yet. THIS is what my countershaft looks like… I'm guessing it's about 98% gone...I'm amazed it didn't strip on me... So…I’ll be tearing the engine further apart shortly to replace the *(^$#%&^ countershaft. I like how the $100+ countershaft (and the many hours labour to replace it) sacrificed itself to protect the $16 sprocket. Nice engineering job you did there Mr. Honda…I've ridden for decades and owned lots of bikes but this is the first time I've had to replace a countershaft. I’ve never split the cases on a bike before (that '78 YZ80 doesn't count) so am reading up on what’s involved. I’m a gearhead so don't think this will be overly complex but I only want to do this once. Before I dive in I was hoping some of the more experienced Thumpertalk members could answer a few questions: - Other than the countershaft itself and the related oil seal is there anything else I should be doing when I’m in there? - My transmission shifts perfectly but I read something about an upgraded “spring” for what I think is the shift-lever return. Can somebody tell me the part number for this upgraded spring as well as how to tell the difference? - Do I need any special tools to split the cases? If so, what are they? Can I substitute something else? For example, I saw a pic of a flywheel puller…wouldn’t any sufficiently long 20x1.5mm bolt do? I thought about the 2nd & 5th gear mods some folks are doing but to be honest I’m an older guy (50 this year!) and my boonie bashing days are mostly behind me. I ride 95% on the street and am happy with the gearing as-is. FYI I'll definitely be putting a XRR sprocket on it when I get back on the road! Other than the above that’s all I can think of for now. Any tips, tricks, watch-outs and advice GREATLY appreciated! TIA, Daryl
  13. Will your subframe support all the weight you are planning to load on the rack? The reason that the OEM Honda rack can't carry much has nothing to do with the rack itself, it's the subframe that supports the rack that is the weak link. IMHO why reinvent the wheel when it comes to a large capacity rack (especially one that puts the weight on the subrame) when there is already a high-capacity rack available that's cheaper? I installed a Cyclerack ($199 + shipping) a couple of years ago and have been extremely pleased with it. I regularly put about 40 pounds of stuff on it with zero problems and have messed around in a parking lot with a 175 pound buddy of mine sitting on the rack without breaking anything (surprisingly, the XRL rides relatively OK with three people on it...just don't hit a bump). It's large enough to fit almost anything you can strap to it and uses braces that put the weight down into the frame rather than the subframe. Those braces look intrusive but they are far enough back that they don't interfere with the rider or passenger and have enough clearance you can still take the side panels off the bike without removing the rack. One nice feature I discovered is that the braces are handy for helping me control the bike when I ride in soft sand. I can brace the back of my legs (calves) on them when trying to lighten the front end, which for me means better control and a lot less tiring. It also provides a fair bit of protection to the bike (and your leg if you don't get out of the way) in a fall. https://cycleracks.com/ProductDetail/tabid/87/ProductID/1/Default.aspx I've not tried any but you can get all sorts of accessories for them to bolt on panniers, gas cans, even a chainsaw! It's got a lifetime warranty though I doubt they get many claims... It's been an awesome rack and I have no problems recommending it to anyone.
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    Good all-rounder but a bit heavy for single track!
    Good all-rounder but a bit heavy for single track!