Russhole

Contributors
  • Content count

    613
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

396 Excellent

About Russhole

  • Rank
    TT Silver Member

Contact Methods

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington
  • Interests
    Dirt bikes, classic cars, general shenanigans.

Recent Profile Visitors

2,081 profile views
    Last summer, the folks at Supersprox USA contacted me to ask if I'd like to try to destroy one of their Stealth Rear Sprockets. I guess that I have a reputation of being hard on stuff! I've run both aluminum and steel sprockets from a variety of brands, usually whatever fit the budget, but the lightness of aluminum and longevity of steel found in the Stealth design sounded pretty awesome. A more accurate term is probably "light-ish", because the sprocket is not made entirely from aluminum. It uses a 7075-T6 aluminum center carrier with a nickel coated carbon steel outer ring riveted to it. Supersprox lists the Stealth Sprocket as handling power from motorcycles up to 1400cc, so my GasGas 250 2T dual sport has margin to spare. The Stealth Sprocket is not all business, coming in flashy anodized colors that add some excitement to your hub. I received a 48 tooth sprocket in a nice looking anodized red that compliments my GasGas well, but a few months of Pac NW singletrack have pretty much taken care of the pretty part. But, I'm a function over form guy, so I'm happy. Installation is the same as any other sprocket with mounting bolts/nuts being sold separately. And, don't go cheap! Do the job right and install new hardware with threadlock. I did a weight comparison with the steel sprocket that I removed: All steel: 2lbs. Supersprox USA Stealth: 1lb. 10oz. Weight saved: 6oz. (about the weight of a proper billiard ball.) As a percentage, that's an unspung weight savings of just under 19%. Not sure that this translates into a measurable performance advantage for most recreational riders, but for racers who are looking for every possible edge, saving weight while maintaining durability matters. Since last summer, I've put nearly 1,600 miles on the Stealth Rear Sprocket, two-thirds being technical singletrack and the rest gravel roads and tarmac. I've packed it full of mud, sand, gravel, and lots and lots of snow and ice. It's been used to launch over roots & rocks, 60 mph highway jogs, and a constant barrage of decaying plant life from woods riding. About the only visible wear is that some of the nickel teeth coating has been rubbed off by the chain. So, still tons of life left in this sprocket. I'll have to report back when it finally wears out, but I expect that to be a long while. My testing conditions: For those who'd like to understand how I maintain my drive components, I installed the Stealth Sprocket with a new chain, using the fairly standard "3 finger" GasGas method for tension. I cleaned the chain and sprocket thoroughly after any muddy ride and lubed it up with PJ1 Black Label Chain Lube as needed. So, over-all, what do I think of the Supersprox USA Stealth Rear Sprocket? It's been outstanding. If you're looking to save a little unsprung weight and want your sprocket to stand-up to abuse for a long while, this sprocket is up to the task. I will definitely be running another one when the time comes. More @ https://www.supersproxusa.com/supersprox-stealth-sprockets/
  1. USFS approved? Or does it just produce extra smog like everything else in China?
  2. From the DOL. They actually responded. Thank you for contacting us. Here is a link to our website with good information on how to registermodified off-road motorcycles. You will need an ORV decal and a motorcycle license plate to ride on public roads. (The law requires modified off-road motorcycles to meet both ORV requirements and requirements for on-road use). I would like to review the vehicle record for you. If you would like to provide the license plate number or VIN, I can take a look at the status of the registration and clarify what your vehicle may require. Thank you, Donna Customer Relations Email Team
  3. I sent an email to the DOL today asking for clarification. I'll let y'all know what they say. If they return my message...
  4. Talk to some officials. But, the way it explained to me was, if your bike is legal on the street then you're legal on the trails. But if you aren't legal on the street you need a permit (orv tabs) for the trails. Since your bike will be titled as"modified from street use" it's safe to assume you're plated and have no need for off-road permits. Seems pretty straight forward. And nobody is exempt from a disco pass on a plated bike.
  5. False. You'll just need to carry a discover pass where applicable. I talked to a DNR enforcement officer about this.
  6. Yes. Pass inspection at a certified inspection dealer, take the paperwork to the DOL and the bike will be retitled for road use and be issued a plate. You'll pay tax on weight. I did this to a GasGas MC250 2 stroke. It ended up being around $200 for inspection and titling.
  7. I had LCG Graphix do an '89 YZ 250. I even did a review on it. They were nice to work with an expressed that just because you don't see a picture on their website, doesn't mean they can't do it. They'll custom make whatever you want. I did a seat cover too, but this is all I can find right now. http://lcggraphix.com/
  8. My first bike was an '01 200 EXC. Great bike. Takes a beating and is light enough for a beginner to pick up out of the bushes repeatedly. I even did a hare scramble on mine and was passing all the 250 4t guys in the 200 class. Paid $1300 years ago for mine. I definitely got my money's worth.
  9. Russ, "(video of the testing conditions)". Please google drive or dropbox your video and I'll upload it.

    1. Russhole

      Russhole

      I'll use the google machine. I had to download it from Youtube. I cleaned up the harddrive a bit...

       

    I'm a technical woods and high mountain single track rider that has has been wearing motocross boots since I can remember. I did try a pair of trials boots that were VERY comfortable, but they just didn't offer enough protection against trail hazards. I had been researching boots with the perfect blend of MX protection and trials style comfort and flexibility, and the Tech 7 Enduro by Alpinestars looked like a great candidate (at least on paper). Key Features of the Tech 7 Enduro Let's start top to bottom. The max usable opening on top is 5"W X 8.5"L with a Velcro enclosure and 4 replaceable aluminum buckles. Alpinestars doesn't necessarily explain the reasoning for the top and bottom buckles facing the opposite direction from the center two, but it's possible that pulling against each other might create a stronger enclosure? I can also see how the very bottom buckle sits out of the way from snags. There's also an extended gaiter to help keep moisture and dirt entry to a minimum, but keep in mind that the Tech 7 Enduro is not marketed as waterproof. Next, is a bio-mechanical pivot that creates really nice flexibility on and off the bike. Instead of just a clunky hinge right in the middle, the whole boot basically flexes in more than one spot. Upfront, there's an anatomically profiled shin plate that's made from a single piece to improve structural integrity. The foot shell of the boot is super resistant to impact and includes a hardened toe protector and a steel shank. The toe box of the boot is more compact than the last set of boots I ran and it has a grippy shift pad. Moving inside the boot, Alpinestars refers to an "Internal 3D Lining" that includes "anti-slide" microfiber suede to help keep your foot in place. Top that off with lots of cushy soft foam around the ankles for all-day comfort. Each boot weighs 4lbs. 7oz. and are CE certified. Checkout the "Description" tab for the entire feature list as I coverage the ones that stood out to me. Initial Impressions Out of the box, "Wow, those are REALLY white!" I took pictures because I knew they'd look terrible after riding in the woods. The overall fit and finish is as top-notch as you'd expect from a leader like Alpinestars. The first time I put my foot in them (no booties to bother with), it was like stepping onto a cloud. They are extremely fluffy and comfortable inside! I wore them for the last hour at work the day they arrived and hardly even noticed I had them on. The Tech 7 Enduro required no break-in period, being comfortable out-of-the-box. In terms of sizing, I generally wear a sized 12, that what I ordered, and I found them to be true-to-size. Since my GasGas 2-stroke is plated, I rode home in my new boots and had to relearn how to shift (more on this below). In terms of the buckle system, I'm not going to lie; I struggled with it. While I generally start from the bottom buckle and go up, with the Tech 7 Enduro, I found that I had to get the Velcro enclosure fastened first, then work my way down, re-adjusting them all again. I felt like as soon as I'd get the boots snug, I'd take a few steps, and they'd feel too loose again. Even once I thought that I had them to my liking, some adjusting was necessary to get them properly snug. With some experimentation, I've got them dialed in and I'm happy, but it just took more work than I'm used to. On-the-Trail Testing For three days of intense trail testing, I headed to Entiat Washington for non-stop switch backs, rock gardens, and beautiful alpine scenery. For the first few miles, I continued to struggle with shifting. However, I don't fault the boot. I'm running wide foot pegs and the arches of the boot are different enough from my previous boot to cause this. It's amazing how even small changes in a boot sole can require adjustments in foot positioning to get your shifting dialed-in. When riding high mountain single track with switchbacks, you plant your inside foot A LOT. There's no just sitting down and riding. We did 215 miles over a long weekend and while my bike took a beating, my feet did not. Washington State has been in a drought, so on day one, the fire danger was extremely high and so were the dust levels. The extended gaiters on the Tech 7 Enduro did a solid job of keeping all the dust out. On day two we lucked out with some rain that made trail conditions perfect! My feet stayed dry for a bit, but when we started pushing through wet brush, I began to feel some moisture getting in. However, water was not pouring in and pooling, just a little dampness. However, I think that our typically very wet Pac NW winters might prove to be a little challenging. But for semi-dry conditions, I think the Tech Enduro does a good job. I also spent time walking around on mountain tops and at creeks, as well as getting off my bike to push it up ridiculous obstacles. Regardless of the activity, my feet remained comfortable and supported. Given the conditions that I was riding, it's inevitable to take some hits to your feet and I recall having my feet swept off the foot pegs a few times by hidden rocks. I'm sure that I took plenty more smaller hits that I don't recall, but that's a good thing (having not noticed)! My feet & shins came out without injury, just how I like it. Foot peg sole grip is excellent and so far, little to no wear. But, both the the sole and foot peg insert are replaceable, so I should get some good life out of the these boots. I actually found that my feet became slightly hung up when I needed to put my foot done a few times. Not sure if there is too much grip or the sole lug pattern hooking on my foot pegs just right? Regardless, the Alpinestars Tech 7 Enduro boots took everything that I through at them and got the job done in comfort. Pros All-Day Comfort. Wide range of mobility. Solid Protection. Grippy, replaceable sole. Cons Not sold on the buckle system just yet. Not waterproof. Russ's Bottom-line I've definitely found a good boot for the technical riding offered in the Pacific Northwest. They allow me to move around on the bike without getting in my way, the protection from trail hazards is great, and they are one of the most comfortable boots I've ever worn. However, I wished that Alpinestars had rounded out the package with a waterproof design, something that is valued by us Pac NW west weather riders.
  10. Washington state requires new plates with title transfers. Cars, trucks, and motorcycles alike. So when people try to tell you "tabs are good til the end of the year" don't let that be a factor in how much you pay.
  11. I only use craigslist for cars anymore. For bikes, Facebook Marketplace and Offerup. Both of those options require you to be a real person with contact information. You can Facebook stalk people if you want to know if they're super weird.