Russhole

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About Russhole

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington
  • Interests
    Dirt bikes, classic cars, general shenanigans.

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  1. My first bike was an '01 200 EXC. Great bike. Takes a beating and is light enough for a beginner to pick up out of the bushes repeatedly. I even did a hare scramble on mine and was passing all the 250 4t guys in the 200 class. Paid $1300 years ago for mine. I definitely got my money's worth.
  2. Russ, "(video of the testing conditions)". Please google drive or dropbox your video and I'll upload it.

    1. Russhole

      Russhole

      I'll use the google machine. I had to download it from Youtube. I cleaned up the harddrive a bit...

       

    I'm a technical woods and high mountain single track rider that has has been wearing motocross boots since I can remember. I did try a pair of trials boots that were VERY comfortable, but they just didn't offer enough protection against trail hazards. I had been researching boots with the perfect blend of MX protection and trials style comfort and flexibility, and the Tech 7 Enduro by Alpinestars looked like a great candidate (at least on paper). Key Features of the Tech 7 Enduro Let's start top to bottom. The max usable opening on top is 5"W X 8.5"L with a Velcro enclosure and 4 replaceable aluminum buckles. Alpinestars doesn't necessarily explain the reasoning for the top and bottom buckles facing the opposite direction from the center two, but it's possible that pulling against each other might create a stronger enclosure? I can also see how the very bottom buckle sits out of the way from snags. There's also an extended gaiter to help keep moisture and dirt entry to a minimum, but keep in mind that the Tech 7 Enduro is not marketed as waterproof. Next, is a bio-mechanical pivot that creates really nice flexibility on and off the bike. Instead of just a clunky hinge right in the middle, the whole boot basically flexes in more than one spot. Upfront, there's an anatomically profiled shin plate that's made from a single piece to improve structural integrity. The foot shell of the boot is super resistant to impact and includes a hardened toe protector and a steel shank. The toe box of the boot is more compact than the last set of boots I ran and it has a grippy shift pad. Moving inside the boot, Alpinestars refers to an "Internal 3D Lining" that includes "anti-slide" microfiber suede to help keep your foot in place. Top that off with lots of cushy soft foam around the ankles for all-day comfort. Each boot weighs 4lbs. 7oz. and are CE certified. Checkout the "Description" tab for the entire feature list as I coverage the ones that stood out to me. Initial Impressions Out of the box, "Wow, those are REALLY white!" I took pictures because I knew they'd look terrible after riding in the woods. The overall fit and finish is as top-notch as you'd expect from a leader like Alpinestars. The first time I put my foot in them (no booties to bother with), it was like stepping onto a cloud. They are extremely fluffy and comfortable inside! I wore them for the last hour at work the day they arrived and hardly even noticed I had them on. The Tech 7 Enduro required no break-in period, being comfortable out-of-the-box. In terms of sizing, I generally wear a sized 12, that what I ordered, and I found them to be true-to-size. Since my GasGas 2-stroke is plated, I rode home in my new boots and had to relearn how to shift (more on this below). In terms of the buckle system, I'm not going to lie; I struggled with it. While I generally start from the bottom buckle and go up, with the Tech 7 Enduro, I found that I had to get the Velcro enclosure fastened first, then work my way down, re-adjusting them all again. I felt like as soon as I'd get the boots snug, I'd take a few steps, and they'd feel too loose again. Even once I thought that I had them to my liking, some adjusting was necessary to get them properly snug. With some experimentation, I've got them dialed in and I'm happy, but it just took more work than I'm used to. On-the-Trail Testing For three days of intense trail testing, I headed to Entiat Washington for non-stop switch backs, rock gardens, and beautiful alpine scenery. For the first few miles, I continued to struggle with shifting. However, I don't fault the boot. I'm running wide foot pegs and the arches of the boot are different enough from my previous boot to cause this. It's amazing how even small changes in a boot sole can require adjustments in foot positioning to get your shifting dialed-in. When riding high mountain single track with switchbacks, you plant your inside foot A LOT. There's no just sitting down and riding. We did 215 miles over a long weekend and while my bike took a beating, my feet did not. Washington State has been in a drought, so on day one, the fire danger was extremely high and so were the dust levels. The extended gaiters on the Tech 7 Enduro did a solid job of keeping all the dust out. On day two we lucked out with some rain that made trail conditions perfect! My feet stayed dry for a bit, but when we started pushing through wet brush, I began to feel some moisture getting in. However, water was not pouring in and pooling, just a little dampness. However, I think that our typically very wet Pac NW winters might prove to be a little challenging. But for semi-dry conditions, I think the Tech Enduro does a good job. I also spent time walking around on mountain tops and at creeks, as well as getting off my bike to push it up ridiculous obstacles. Regardless of the activity, my feet remained comfortable and supported. Given the conditions that I was riding, it's inevitable to take some hits to your feet and I recall having my feet swept off the foot pegs a few times by hidden rocks. I'm sure that I took plenty more smaller hits that I don't recall, but that's a good thing (having not noticed)! My feet & shins came out without injury, just how I like it. Foot peg sole grip is excellent and so far, little to no wear. But, both the the sole and foot peg insert are replaceable, so I should get some good life out of the these boots. I actually found that my feet became slightly hung up when I needed to put my foot done a few times. Not sure if there is too much grip or the sole lug pattern hooking on my foot pegs just right? Regardless, the Alpinestars Tech 7 Enduro boots took everything that I through at them and got the job done in comfort. Pros All-Day Comfort. Wide range of mobility. Solid Protection. Grippy, replaceable sole. Cons Not sold on the buckle system just yet. Not waterproof. Russ's Bottom-line I've definitely found a good boot for the technical riding offered in the Pacific Northwest. They allow me to move around on the bike without getting in my way, the protection from trail hazards is great, and they are one of the most comfortable boots I've ever worn. However, I wished that Alpinestars had rounded out the package with a waterproof design, something that is valued by us Pac NW west weather riders.
  3. Washington state requires new plates with title transfers. Cars, trucks, and motorcycles alike. So when people try to tell you "tabs are good til the end of the year" don't let that be a factor in how much you pay.
  4. I only use craigslist for cars anymore. For bikes, Facebook Marketplace and Offerup. Both of those options require you to be a real person with contact information. You can Facebook stalk people if you want to know if they're super weird.
    If you're a technical woods rider like me, big, clunky knee braces just don't work for you. Over the years I've worn a multitude of inexpensive plastic knee/shin protection and while most did the job, some had migration issues while others rubbed my skin raw. Now in my mid 30s, I'm even more concerned with protection and support, but I still didn't want to commit to a huge, clunky robo-guard. But, when I saw the sleek new EVS Sports T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pad, I had to try them. Designed for the lunatic himself (Travis Pastrana), the T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pad has been positioned as, "For those looking for complete support without the bulk of a traditional knee brace." That's me! Patella protection comes from a hard outer shell with Reactive Memory Foam (RMF) behind it. RMF is normally flexible, conforming to your knee for a comfortable fit, stiffens upon impact, and immediately returns to a flexible state. Cool stuff! The main carrier body is made from bio foam because it can be thinner and is more flexible than traditional foams, yet still offers good protection. Migration is controlled by silicone strips on the inner sleeve and the integrated internal floating knee sleeve offers continuous support, even when the carrier body moves around. The T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pad is secured to your leg by Velcro straps above and below the knee and is further held in place by your boot. Here's an exploded view the nicely shows each component and it's orientation. Exploded View of the EVS TP199 Knee/Shin Pad Out-of-the box, the EVS Sports T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pads appear to be well constructed. The materials appear to be of good quality, the stitching looks top notch, and they're pleasing to the eye. I like em'! With a handful of good hard rides in, they're holding up extremely well with no visible signs of wear. Time will tell, but I expect them to last a good bit. When I first put them on, they reminded me of those simple compression knee braces. The inner sleeve really keeps them nice and snug. Once in place, they're super low profile. They're MUCH longer than I expected (18-ish inches), so if you don't wear over-the-boot pants like me, probably a good idea to put them off before your pants. However, I was able to pull my pant legs up just enough to still fasten the top Velcro strap. I put them on at home without my boots and walked around a bit to see how they felt. I got sucked into doing some work in the garage and pretty much forgot I was wearing them. With boots on, the feeling is the same. Unlike some of the cheapy units I've used, both on and off the bike, the T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pads stay right where I put them and any protective gear you can forget you're wearing is comfortable. On the bike, the T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pads don't restrict movement, but you do notice there is some added stiffness as part of the built-in support systems. However, I had no migration issues and they didn't interfere with my riding in any way. In terms of protection, thankfully I've not wadded it up while wearing them. About all I've noticed is that with cheapy pads, I can usually feel branches & other trail junk bouncing off my lower legs, something that was greatly reduced wearing the T.P. 199s. It would appear that the larger knee cap and RMF armor behind it do a lot better job absorbing impacts. About the only con that I can mention, is that they are a little on the warm side. It's summer time and there's a few more layers to these guards than the cheapies I've worn. However, given the increased protection, lack of migration, and comfort, an easy trade-off. Pros Compression sleeve support. No pad migration. Low profile design. All day comfort. Good value. Cons On the warm side for summer conditions. Russ's Bottom-line In my experience, the EVS Sports T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pad is an excellent piece of safety equipment. Without the bulk of traditional knee braces, EVS has found a way to utilize high tech foams to provide good protection & support in lightweight, compact design that I genuinely enjoy riding in. If you're looking to move up from standard plastic $25 guards and into the world of getting a little older and caring about your knees, the T.P. 199 Knee/Shin Pads are a great way to increase the longevity of your riding days.
  5. Seems there's a disagreeance in the force. Just be smart about it. If you're going 50mph and cram it down into 1st, you're gonna have bad time. One gear change down without the clutch is very normal.
  6. I good used master cylinder can be bought for the price of a hard to find rebuild kit. Buy a common one and be done with it.
  7. If for whatever reason I need to ride the bike to a store, I have a front disc lock. That'll at least slow someone down. If somebody wants your bike that bad, they'll get it. Insurance is $75 for a year on a plated dirt bike in Washington State... Let'em take it.
  8. My '04 Gas Gas MC 250 has at least 500 hours on it. Only about 30 hours on the top end. I've replaced some stupid stuff due to wear and tear, but for the most part, all I have to to do keep the air filter clean, air up the tubliss once in a while, and keep a good spark plug in it. Check the bolts before you ride, lube the chain after a wash, don't crash so much.
  9. You'll be fine. I commute in 25 mph zones a few days a week on my plated 2 stroke Gas Gas. It's woods tuned though so it can be putted around...
  10. I stopped at a local boat launch to take a photo and when I got back on the bike and headed back down the dirt road there was a guy walking his dog with his truck. The driver pulled off and I slowly passed them both. Then the dog started barking and chasing me. It seemed like he was trying to nip at my boots. Once I saw that, I gave him a 2 stroke gravel shower. That seemed to solve the problem.
  11. All balls rebuild kit and some random parts in the garage got it working.
  12. MSR Baja Fanny pack for regular rides (keeps the weight down low) , Camelbak trail builder pack for hauling the chainsaw.