Michael Janulaitis

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About Michael Janulaitis

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    TT Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Utah
  1. I trail ride in the mountains. Average speed over the last 1500 miles (3 months) is about 16 mph. I weight 165-170 and get totally pounded by any type of bump. I had Pro-Actions valves and a rear Pro-Action bladder installed last week but the installer was supposed to change out the springs as well but said I would bottom out if I got softer springs. Well I'd rather bottom than get pounded all day by bumps. My question is this, where can I find suggested weights for springs? On Rocky Mountain ATV I see the part numbers, but no description of weight ranges. On other sites the same. What front and rear springs do I need?
  2. I bought it as well, I was just wondering because his winter jet specs use a standard needle.
  3. Has anyone used the Rekluse LHRB lever to control the clutch?
  4. I have 1250 miles of high altitude mountain single track trails over the last 2 months on my new 300 XCW. Brake pads look still like new. No visible wear. I don't have a foot pedal so maybe you're dragging your brakes too much with your foot or you have defective pads. dudleyscrf, I have the same issue you have...I'm ordering the caliper cooler from Jeff Slavens later today. Has anyone used the LHRB lever to control the clutch instead? I have capped my clutch and that's a real pain when I want to ghost ride from speed. I have to stop to get the bike in neutral
  5. I ride in the mountains of Utah. On long steep single track descents my rear brake (controlled by right hand lever only) gets mushy and hard to lock-up with a 10lbs Trials X tire. If I stop for a few minutes and let the rotors/fluid cool the rear brake is able to easily lock up again. I have to take extra note to get on the front brake more and constantly pump. I'm running the stock rotors and pads. The only mod is the foot pedal delete and RHRB setup using the stock right hand lever. Jeff Slavens states on his web site that the carbon pads he sells will get rid of the grabby feeling. Well the grabby feeling is exactly what I want. I'm a little confused because when brake fluid boils, brakes get mushy not grabby. I do get a grabby feeling when the brakes heat up a little which I like. When they overheat the grabby is all gone and instead the brakes are mushy. So my question is this, should I use carbon or sintered metal pads? Also what's the best rotor to use? I am going to order the caliper cooler from Jeff to help cool the fluid.
  6. What is the needle Jeff is using? N2ZL?
  7. I also run 150/35 (POS #2) but against Jeff's recommendations. He told me 38 was not too rich. I was still fouling plugs with the 38. Since I put the 35 in I have not fouled a single plug. It's starting to get colder now so I just ordered some main jets from Jeff. With the change of seasons, it's cold at first light and I've also got to get ready for places like Moab with cold temps and low altitudes. The tuning will have to start all over again. Does anyone know of some good tunes for 5K at 40-65 degrees?
  8. Doh. Yes I realized after my last post my ATV has a clamp on filter.
  9. OK then I am lost. I equated the KTM air box to be a clamp on type because there is no screw. I guess I've never seen a clamp on air filter then. I was thinking the grease was only meant for rubber contact points and since the foam filters don't have rubber the grease would eat the foam. It sounds like I'm OK.
  10. For the first time in 1000 miles since I got my 300 XC-W I noticed some dirt in the lower left corner of the air filter frame. I had some K&N sealing grease laying around and put that on only to read later not to use it on clamp on filters. Why? K&N makes the statement but nowhere do they explain why. Is there a chemical in it that eats the foam? If so, wow, I'll throw that away immediately. I sure don't want anything in any airbox that can corrode materials.
  11. Thanks I did try a 35 pilot jet but when I tested for a lean condition as Jeff Slavens shows on his youtube video the bike was clearly lean. I put the 38 back in and no more lean condition. That said, I fouled a plug the other day after 100 miles of slow high altitude (8-10K) riding. Yep that's what Jeff told me to do as well...no more oil leaking from the joint. Thanks.
  12. I bought the mountain jet kit from Jeff Slaven and have had good success with it. I am running the #38 pilot, 150 main and #2 position on the needle. I ride between 7K and 10.5K on single track in northern Utah (America Fork if your familiar with the area). I am running 50:1 Klotz with 91 octane gas and no octane booster. I am getting quite a bit of oil leaking from the joint between the pipe and the silencer. Also up high my bike tries to stall when I stop. Although my Rekluse clutch leverless setup has some influence on stalling I don't have this problem when lower down the mountain. Enough oil is leaking out the joint it is splattering on my swing arm, shock and clutch case. My thought was to put in a #35 pilot. I was hoping someone here would be able to offer a possible solution.
  13. Just a few hundred years ago in one of your previous life's you argued with astronomers and sailors that the world was flat.
  14. After riding 50 miles on mountain single track and installing ASV Series 6 levers the lines feel much better and the throw is much shorter. I would however like a little less pull to lock the back up but I have adjusted. Something I never really thought about however is that our feet are much stronger and have better leverage than our fingers so using a foot brake is easier to lock up the back when you have the bike in gear. Simple physics dictates since the front wheel is lighter and there is no chain turning on it, it will be easier to lockup. So the same lever swapped to the rear will have worse performance.
  15. Here's my implementation of the turkey baster mod. I used a torch to heat up the hose and just slipped it over the base of the baster. There is no overflow hose but there is a drill hole in the top. If it becomes an issue, I'll add the overflow hose. I didn't see the point because in my first 250 miles in the mountains I still have not had to add any coolant. For now with a quick look I can see if I'm overheating and just park it on the mountain for a few.