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About gmc28

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  1. I assume it's based on where you live, but 1300 sounds right from what I've seen over last year or so around here. Under $1000 machines usually look a lot worse. Ya, $500 for an old tired one is not uncommon, but then I see titled (zing), plated, clean ones with a few upgrades advertised at over $2k. Straight dirt, no title/plates.... Leaves you in a weird spot for a clean bike, for pricing. Maybe try the lost title deal with dmv. Usually a big hassle, and might not work, but that would certainly help resale.
  2. as webmontro noted, Jesse is the man for DR's. his site, though calling is sometimes better than just checking the web site as not everything he has is on the site. i think the carb is something like $350 with the cables and throttle, but can't remember for sure. You certainly can do rings and/or piston without boring, but that all depends on whats going on in there once you open it up. as webmonstro said, you can pull the top end and cheaply and more easily try some things there, like clean up the seats, replace the seals, and just go on from there based on what you see. The full-meal-deal, to replace or machine everything, can get spendy, but usually a lot less can suffice. A local machine shop can clean up your cylinder, or bore it, and i believe Jesse will do that too if you send it to him, or of course if you're set up for it you can clean it up yourself. With 25,000 miles its hard to say what you'll find, based on how its been treated to this point, but i'd probably be leaning towards being ready to do some cylinder and ring work, but who knows.
  3. Hmmm. lot of stuff said there, but generally sounds like you're on the right track. A lot of little things could be contributing to your issues, though carb issues are most likely. I'd start with stuff that won't be a waste if it turns out to not be the problem, so that for me would be the carb. There's good reasons for and against the flat slide pumper, but mainly its the preferred way to go, and bolting on a new carb would take the carb issue off the table once and for all (you can chase carb issues on old carbs for a long time, if you're unlucky...). And, if it turns out to be something else, you won't have wasted the money on the carb, as you'll want that anyway in my opinion, if in fact you want the better throttle response. If you do that, i'd buy it from jesse, which won't seem as cheap, but his is a reliable solution with all the extras you'll need in the package (except the air intake hose, which you scab together from auto parts store stuff), unlike the ebay carbs many of which might not have the throttle linkage/cable items you'll need, wrong jets (cheap to replace though), and possibly could be less than perfect quality. Not saying an ebay carb is always a bad deal, and in fact can be a good deal, but jesse's pumper he sells for the DR is kind of a no-brainer, though it is a bit spendier. After that, just read that service manual you have, the Clymer (or whatever book you have) manual, search this forum, and pull it apart. One of the nifty things about the DR is that its a simple machine. like any machine it has some goofy features, and some tricks to getting some things figured out, but mostly its nice and simple. That's asuming you have a decent set of tools and a little work space. A wiseco (or other) piston is cheap, a set of new gaskets, and you're most of the way toward addressing the obvious stuff that needs addressing. Check your timing chain while its apart.... I rebuilt mine last winter and failed to check my chain for stretch, and now have to dig back in and swap in a new one. Will probably turn the heater on in my cold shop next week or so and get that done... The kickstart conversion should work fine. I used a 95 E start case (ebay) on my 92 dirt model (cracked case), and the kickstart stuff transferred over from the 92 to the 95 fine. My old 92 had similar issues to yours, but was worse in some respects. It now starts and runs great, except at high rpm thanks to my timing chain. I did the pumper carb, wiseco (441) piston, and then went ahead and had megacycle do my cam, plus new valve springs, guides, etc., and its great.
  4. Plugeyes link is the ticket. But also note that if you don't have a compression release on a kickstart only, its more than just a good idea to get that modified back to what it should be... I don't recall the auto-decomp options on the DR (I have manual), but hopefully you have some kind of decomp otherwise, ya, it'll be a pig to start, and I've heard that damage can be done if not using some sort of decomp on a system that is supposed to have it (haven't thought much about that, but i recall hearing that). If you haven't already, there's lots and lots of stuff written about the best way to kick start the DR (since there have been loads of "starts head" threads started over the years). I'll leave that for a search for you if you don't already have that, but in short, a blip of the throttle, a handful of kicks with the decomp lever pulled (and likely choke on, if cold), then a couple kicks with the "click release", and you should be good to go, assuming things on the carb (etc) are dialed in. Mine started horribly when i first got it as a borderline basket case, but a winter later in the shop which included (among many other things) a fresh valve adjust and (in my case a new pumper) well adjusted carb and now it starts real easy. Happy to add more to that topic, but i won't unless asked as you've probably seen all that or know it already... and enjoy the machine. I "upgraded" for a lot of my off-road riding to a WR450, but have kept the DR as I just love it.
  5. seems like a square deal. you'll certainly see that folks have picked them up cheaper than that, but there are also a lot of deals you'll hear about where folks have paid more for basically stock bikes, from what i've seen. miles are a little high perhaps for the price, but then again rings and a hone (and a piston) can be done pretty cheap if that's the worst of it. I picked up mine quite a bit cheaper, but it had issues, so it was a known "project" bike, so you'd expect that. If its real clean, $1500 seems worth it.
  6. Thanks, but its not that kind of 3-stooges scenario.... They are definitely from a DR350, and they fit and work great now, now that they're all buttoned up after servicing. Only question is really which model 350, as I know there are a couple different forks offered on the different DR models, based on model and year. The schematic above from excitable is basically what i have, but that schematic is not what i have in the 2 manuals that i have. I'm just looking to nail down with some confidence the details on the fork model, so i can know which specs to chase down (schematics, service details, etc.)
  7. Would love to have someone chime in and confirm what it is I have with these "new-to-me" used forks, which I believe are off a '98 350 (mystery bike), being installed on my '92 DR S model. The diagram above from Excitable looks to be an accurate representation.... is that from a 98 dirt model? if so, that's that. The manuals I have, one suzuki brand service manual, plus one more from Chilton or Haines, don't quite match what i have, and don't even mention any differences in the fork models, even though they include "90-98" or some such date range. spring length is wrong, there are some obviously different parts, etc. They look to match what i have on my old 92 forks. Mainly just curious, since the manuals say they address the 98 model as well, but things don't match up. Also, since i'm not 100% sure what i have with these forks, and don't have a manual that matches them for specs, can anyone chime in on how much fork oil to add? I have one reference to 494ml off this forum, which is what i used for now, and seems to be fine, but looking for some backup on that. thx
  8. Closing the loop (mostly....): Finally got back out to shop and pulled the dust seal and circlip, and then got everything apart. But had to see it all apart (the hard way) before I could see what all that dust seal included and how to get it out next time without messing it up. I'll just say that on this first go-around the dust seal and circlip would not be usable again, even if i wanted to. A little thick-headed of me, but all good now for the other side to do it easier and right...
  9. I've got some old parts, but thinking you'll want to see what you really need first, which could help spark memory of what it sitting in a box in the shop... That rubber from the airbox to carb can probably be rigged using hose from automotive shop, though even that can be spendy. I think the stock hose is not cheap from dealer, but ebay may have some stockers cheap. looks like you're missing a chain? good o'rings are available everywhere. I think I ended up getting mine off amazon. stock bash guards are cheap on ebay, with a little patience, or I think good aftermarket ones are around $70-120 if i recall correctly (i need one too).
  10. here's a pic of the seal i'm wondering about. This shows how I received the used 98 forks, apparently without an outer dust seal (?) the seal you can see is the one I'm wondering about, whether i should pry that out with a small flathead, and then maybe a circlip is revealed, or do i just "slide hammer" the whole thing out?
  11. thanks excitable... i don't think i have that outer dust seal, which looks to be #7 in the diagram, but part #5 with the #6 spring boot tightener (if i'm reading that right). So if i am reading it right, its getting #5 out of there which may be my issue. But i'll get a snap shot later and post it to see if i'm looking at the right thing.
  12. anyone have a 98 specific service manual? I picked up a set of 98 dirt forks for my older 92, and am going through them before installing (replacing the 92 forks). Problem is the 2 manuals i have don't differentiate for the 98 cartridge style forks, which is by-and-large fine, except the fork seals on these 98's have me on hold, as it looks like i'd damage them if i try and work them out with a small flat bladed screwdriver (like i would on the 92's). So just looking for guidance on whether i "slide hammer" that fork seal out (sliding the tube and slider back and forth), or if that seal needs to come out first, along with possibly some sort of circlip that might be under that seal? I'll admit that i've not done much with forks over the years other than change the oils, so its not at all out of the question that i'm just missing something obvious. I've had the 92's apart in the past, and a few others here and there, but thats it, and this fork seal looks different, so don't want to needlessly jack them up... i can add a pic if necessary, but hopefully someone with the cartridge forks will know what i'm getting at.
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  14. I forget my jet "anatomy", and always just refresh my memory by looking at a diagram when needed, but if its only at the higher rpm that would imply its just the one jet (main in that case?... i forget), and as bigshifter says something has either come loose, or some foreign material got up in there, or maybe its sticky.