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danfarson

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About danfarson

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    TT Member

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  • Location
    Illinois
  • Interests
    Enduro, ADV, Rally, trail riding

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  1. danfarson

    Measuring chain wear

    323.0 minus 318.2 is 4.8 mm 'growth'. Which is VERY close to 3/16 inch (4.76 mm). Therefore, you could use 15 and 3/16 inch instead of 15 and 1/8 inch as the limit. I don't know about you, but I don't have any metric tape measures laying around.
  2. danfarson

    Measuring chain wear

    A carpenter's tape measure is quicker and better than using a caliper for measuring, because it averages measurement over a longer length of chain. 99% of dirt bikes use 5xx chain, which is exactly 5/8 inch pin-to-pin. Which means 24 links is 15.000 inches on a new chain. Over 24 links, 1/8 inch 'growth' in length indicates .8% wear. That's a good limit to use as a guide for chain replacement. Put the bike on a stand with rear wheel off the ground, put it in gear, apply backwards rotation on the rear wheel to tension the top run of chain, measure as above. Hint: Hook the tape at the front edge of an outside link, measure to the front edge of the 13th outside link back. Anything over 15 and 1/8 inch is bad.
  3. danfarson

    2012 rmz 250 sprocket nuts stripped!

    You will SERIOUSLY regret use of a cold chisel in this situation. Damage to the hub is 99% certain. Get the least expensive Dremel motor with a grinding wheel on it, cut between the lightening holes on the sprocket so you can remove the outer portion of the sprocket. This will give you room to get the six-point box-end wrench on the nut, apply the necessary torque to get it off. Alternatively, you could try drilling into the allen-head portion of the sprocket bolt with an 8mm (5/16inch) drill bit. Once you get down to the point where the tapered head meets the straight shank of the bolt, allen head should be ready to pop off. Re: Joerc51 comment on sprocket bolt holes in hub being threaded. I've changed rear sprockets on many Suzuki dirt bikes, have never seen threads in these holes.
  4. danfarson

    2015 X-Trainer battery drain.

    A bit more review on use a multi-meter, and brush-up on DC electrical theory seems in order. 'Voltage draw' is not a thing. Typically referred to as 'voltage drop'. Current draw, yes. For most locations on a motorcycle wiring harness, voltage will be either be 12.5 plus or minus 1 volt, or zero. Attached is schematic for a 2015 Beta X-trainer. Zoom in as necessary on the schematic to read the wire colors, component numbers. Hope you can identify the component you unplugged.
  5. danfarson

    Beta Xtrainer 300 2015

    Just bought it. No ride report yet.
  6. danfarson

    Beta Xtrainer 300 (2015)

    0 comments

    Just bought it. No ride report yet.
  7. danfarson

    2015 X-Trainer battery drain.

    First, learn how to use the ammeter function of your multimeter. https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/experiments/chpt-2/ammeter-usage/ With the multimeter hooked up to measure CURRENT drawn from the battery (not voltage), start unplugging and plugging back in various components to figure out which component is drawing current. The electrical diagram in your owners manual will be very useful in this project.
  8. Maintenance is essential, but there's always the 'unknown unknown' unusual circumstance waiting out there. I've done a bit of solo riding in areas where the next passerby is hours or days in the future. SPOT Connect https://www.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=116 is a good backup. Even if you're disabled to the point where you don't/can't push the SOS button, chances are excellent whoever you've set up to look at your SPOT location webpage will see the group of most recent location reports coming from the same place, and send some help.
  9. danfarson

    DRZ 400 E Gearing For Street

    Regarding the case savers: 'E's have a case saver specifically sized for 14T front sprocket, 'S' has a case saver sized for 15T front sprocket. Buy an additional case saver in the size you don't have so you can swap back and forth to match the front sprocket you're installing. They even have a '14' or '15' stamped on them to help you tell them apart. 14T https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/detail/suzuki/27640-29f00/b1065304?m=139167&sch=245871 15T https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/detail/suzuki/27640-29f11/b1065305?m=9747&sch=508667
  10. danfarson

    New CRF450L - Modern DRZ?

    The rear hub in the attached image, from this article, https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2018/05/23/2019-honda-crf450l-fast-facts-and-photos/ does NOT have a cush rear hub. The article mentions "rubber-damped steel sprockets". I think this means something like the rubber rings bonded to each side of the DRZ400S/SM OEM 15-tooth ( steel with lightening holes) countershaft sprocket. Which I believe only serve to somewhat quiet the noise made by the chain engaging with the countershaft sprocket. Zero effect on cushioning drivetrain impacts. Prove me wrong.
  11. Summary: If you live in Illinois, register your dirt bike in Vermont. I moved to Illinois in August 2017. Have Suzuki DRZ400E, which I had titled, 'street-legalized', insured and registered in Virginia a few years earlier. That process was straightforward. Time-consuming, but not hard. Also did the same in Virginia for a Yamaha TTR230. Both of these bikes came new from the manufacturer as 'dirt bikes', not street legal. Illinois Secretary of State (SoS, which is the DMV equivalent from other states) absolutely refused to ever consider these bikes as street legal no matter what. No special construction, nothing. I got this word directly from a rep from the SoS office in Springfield IL. He cited Illinois Code 625 ILCX 5/3-401 section c, subsection c1 as the applicable regulation which prohibits registering a motorcycle in Illinois which started life as a dirt bike. So I registered the DRZ and TTR in Vermont, using the Virginia titles, my address in Illinois, and my Illinois drivers license number. This is specifically permitted by the Vermont DMV. $46 per year for registration only. No tax due unless you need to get a Vermont title for the bike because you don't already have a title. See Vermont DMV form VD-119 http://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/documents/VD-119-Vehicle_Reg_Tax_Title_App.pdf and the instructions for the form at http://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/documents/VD-119i-Registration_App_Instructions.pdf Easy process. Mailed in the completed registration application and check, got plates in the mail about two weeks later. Note VT mails the registration paper separate from the plates, which you may get before or after getting the plates. Postal theft mitigation.
  12. danfarson

    RMX Dual sport viability?

    After some more analysis, another famous quote is applicable: Trust, but Verify!!! I'm back to my original analysis. The stock DRZ400S/SM sprocket is one piece of steel, with no cush feature. The picture below clearly shows that. The features that looked like they might be a cushion feature are in reality just eight weight reduction holes filled with rubber. The rubber on the sides of the sprocket was probably designed to reduce the noise of each chain link engaging with the sprocket.
  13. danfarson

    Acting like it’s out of time

    The cam chain looks like there's no tension on it (actually, looks like there's slack in the chain) between the two cam sprockets. Mine is under tension from the cam chain chain tensioner when I check valve clearances.. May adds some weight the comments from 'Highsided' above.
  14. danfarson

    RMX Dual sport viability?

    Mark Twain quotes comes to mind: It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. I've been looking at these sprockets for years, but never closely enough to see that cush feature. Nice. It really is two pieces of metal with rubber in between them!!
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