Goatse

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About Goatse

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  1. There's a post on here about the 3 springs that come in the KTM kit and them being compared to the OEM Beta spring. If these are the same springs as in the KTM kit, then the stock Beta spring is apparently quite a bit softer than all 3 of the springs in the kit.
  2. Thanks. I was just about to buy this and I have a Gnarly with a dent in the skinny section. Sounds like I'm better using heat.
  3. Interesting on the fork change. I wonder if the CC units will get the same (1 leg does rebound, the other does compression). Can you even do that on a CC setup?
  4. Which isn't really good news. Darn I was hoping OD was the same, but the ID was different, hence the need for the KTM spacers. If they're the same bearing then the hub width must be different between the 2 which causes the difference. So modified KTM spacers would still be the best route. Edit. Or wait... Maybe I still have a shot. Hopefully the difference is in the oil seal. I'll be able to pull my rear wheel off Thursday and measure the rest. I'll be sure to post up my results.
  5. Oh man...
  6. ZF is the same company as Sachs.
  7. As messed up as it sounds, I would love to be able to enter a race I couldn't finish (and not due to a mechanical or an injury).
  8. So I picked up a set of KTM wheels and the 'only' thing I had to do was get some 22mm KTM spacers for the rear and mill 2mm off the brake side. Well I ordered those spacers on May 4th, and they still are not here... F'n EBay. So I've now had to consider other sources. I see guys are having very good luck with the SKF full kits that come with new bearings, seals, and spacers. So my question is, are the actual bearings the same outside diameter between the 2 wheels? If I pulled the bearings out of the KTM wheels, would the full SKF setup (for the Beta) fit into the KTM hub? I could measure this myself, but the bearings on my Beta wheels are in good shape and I don't want to pull a bearing and risk messing it up. I'd prefer to only pull a bearing when it's actually being replaced. But maybe (hopefuly) someone has a bare wheel set around or has been down this road before. Or if someone (dealer maybe) has a set of bearings for both bikes, and they could take a measurement of each.
  9. I tried the Shinko 216 in the Fatty size and it's my favorite front to date. I did raise the forks in the triple (lower the front) a touch to make up for the taller tire. I tried the 525 Cheater and it was toast after 2 rides. I recently tried the Ibex and it's getting better wear 'and' I feel it grips better. It's still only a 3-4 ride tire, but it wears better than the 525 Cheater on my bike. I will say. We had a rocky stream climb in the last race I did, and that Ibex rear was impressive. It was 100% rock with running water on it, and the rear hooked like it was dry. Not a single slip, spin, or slide. It'll probably be my new race tire.
  10. The answers I see for the LHRB aren't really why one ties into an auto clutch. Sure a LHRB has advantages on steep downhills, off camber, etc, but those are present with manual clutches as well. Ben, the reason guys go with a LHRB with an auto clutch is because the bike will now freewheel (forward or backward) and not lockup even with the engine off. So where this can get tricky is if you don't make a steep climb. Sure the bike won't stall, but you still might stop. So to keep the bike from rolling backward (or forward when turning around), a LHRB is handy to keep your rear wheel locked up like you would have with a dead engine and a manual clutch. It's more for safety IMO with an auto clutch and the rest of the advantages are just a bonus of course.
  11. https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/734/48164/Nihilo-Concepts-Air-Box-Bolt-Kit
  12. This is an extremely good point.
  13. Interesting. I'll have to check mine as well. I've noticed I'd not been able to keep the weight over the front in corners like before, but figured it was a 'me' thing.
  14. I rode pretty well all models of the 2018 just last weekend. It had a mix of most everything. Roots, loose rocks, square edged rock faces, and whooped out single track. The OC forks were quite nice when going nice and slow, but when up to speed they didn't take rock hits very well (deflect). But I will say, the CC forks on the RE's were quite a bit better than my (slightly) modded '16 RE forks. In slow 1st and 2nd gear stuff, then sure. But that held true for OC VS CC in 2016 as well. At speed though, my 2016 CC units hold a line better than the OC forks on the 2018's I rode. I'd say on the 2018 models the forks seem to be closer to what they're 'supposed' to be. The OC units are super plush for slow stuff, and you can't really expect them to take huge fast hits anyway IMO. Where the CC forks are more expensive, but at least now it's quite obvious why. The CC Sachs on the 2018's are a very nice fork right out of the box. I would be completely happy with the internals out of the 300RR RE I rode to be put right into my 2016 forks.
  15. The 500 did not feel boring to me at all. That thing was a wheelie monster and the best way to put it would be is it's a sledge hammer. It's too much bike for tight single track and was too much work to muscle around for me to even enjoy it. The wide open hill climbs the bike was an absolute giggle, so I can see where the bike would be great. It's just not ideal in the type of terrain I prefer to ride.