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Tokyo_Tiddler

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About Tokyo_Tiddler

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    New Jersey
  1. Lots of titanium footpeg options for Honda 2002+ CR250's but none for the 2001 CR250. I was wondering if the 2002 footpeg brackets will fit on the 2001 frame? That would open up my footpeg options.
  2. Tokyo_Tiddler

    water pump seal removal on 2001 CR250

    Many thanks for the manual. I had been using one written in Japanese (bought the bike in Japan). The bike is pristine and the seal wasn't leaking.. I am just going through the whole bike and while I had the pump cover off, I thought I would quickly replace just the water seal. I had too many things to do and didn't want to spend the extra time taking the whole side cover off. Turns out the seal has a steel collar in it and will not be easy to pry out so I will remove the side cover and order up an oil seal and cover gasket.
  3. Anyone have any suggestions on the best way to remove the water pump seal without removing the whole side engine cover. People just say "pry it out" but don't want to bugger up anything.
  4. Tokyo_Tiddler

    RHC 23 cam report

    Call him up.. he is a super knowledgeable and helpful guy. Good customer service. He is better on the phone than email. He is also on this site. mike
  5. Tokyo_Tiddler

    RHC 23 cam report

    I installed Ron Hamp's 23 cam in a very low hour 2012 CRF 450. Stock compression and porting, but full FMF exhaust, Injectioneering TB mod, Moto Tassanari Airboot and a few other minor mods. I was looking to keep the great bottom to mid and throttle response, but add a little more all around and get it to rev a little more. It definitely did exactly that. I was very happy with the result. The only regret I had was that the new cam does not have the significant weight lightening holes like the stock Honda cam has since I have a major focus on weight reduction. I highly recommend this cam. mike
  6. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    I guess there is a difference between want and need.
  7. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    Hahaha.. it is often said that with man's pursuit of more horsepower, we will never be satisfied until a mere 1/16 of a turn of the throttle results in instant death and utter annialiation of everything around us. mike
  8. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    that sounds like a nice set up.. need to look into the Vance and Hine exhaust. My current exhaust saved me 3.64 lbs which is about 1.7kg.
  9. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    Exactly.. all that is missing and planned for next winter is a 13:1 J&E piston and Ron Hamp cylinder porting. I dont need the additional power, so I am no hurry. I planned on rebuilding the top end around 60-70 hours. I may also add a Vertex ignition.
  10. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    About $25k including the cost of the bike and not including the HRC parts. Totally not worth it for most people, but I had to do it at least once before I hang up my "leathers" for good.
  11. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    re. the footpeg offset, it is what most of the Honda team was running and the only option available to me. We someone offers you a brand new works part, you can't get picky The clamps are stock offset. The bike turned like a barge and was very nervous entering corners. I have absolutely no complaints now with the mods I made.. totally different machine.
  12. Tokyo_Tiddler

    2015 winter project - Home built "works bike" - Part II

    Some more pics..
  13. This is part II of my previous thread on building a “home-built” works bike as a winter project. I took it a step further. It doesn’t compare to the beautiful work that some other have done, but it is my attempt at building something unique. These days, you can buy a lot of cool parts that weren’t available many years ago and build what was once only available on works machines. The idea was that I would throw a lot of money at the bike, searching all over the world and testing various parts to separate the “chaff from the wheat” so to speak, but I did end up with a few actual unobtanium works parts in the process. I don’t like the air forks, dual mufflers or pointy plastic of the 2013+ CRF’s so I started with a left over 2012, one of the best looking bikes to come from Honda in the last few decades. I also am a 2 stroke guy, so to make a this 4 stroke more to my liking, I decided it could weigh no more than my CR250, had to have similar performing suspension to the works Showa’s on my old 2 stroke, and I had to get rid of the 4 stroke engine braking as much as possible. http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1075715-winter-project-a-home-built-works-bike/page-2?hl=%2Bhome+%2Bbuilt+%2Bworks#entry11499895 This 2012 CRF450 now weighs less than the AMA limit. I weighed it yesterday and the wet weight (just over ½ tank of fuel) and it was 225lbs. Dry weight is between 218 and 219lbs. 1. The weight reduction is due to; -Complete Mettec titanium bolt, nut, and screw set, including both axles and swingarm pivot -All plastic body parts and engine cases use IRP aluminum bolts -Carbon fiber parts include; fuel tank, engine mounts, front and rear brake rotor guards, rear caliper guard, chain guide, oil filter guard. Most came from Europe from the teams and manufacturers that make the parts for the GP bikes -I used the lightest hubs and rims I could find. The hubs are TCR, but the rear is a lightweight version machined for the Geico Honda team. The regular DID Dirtstar rims are stronger than stock but lighter than the LT-X version. -Titanium rear shock spring -HRC titanium foot pegs and mounts -CNC machined front brake caliper, fork lugs and fork caps. -Think technologies bar pad and seat foam (I am in the process of replacing this with Guts racing seat foam which should be a little more comfy) -Removing the air filter backfire screen was a nice little weight loss, for free. -Titanium and carbon fiber exhaust was the most cost effective weight saver 2. Suspension mods with valving and lots of help from Paul Bruno at RG3 New Jersey: - Both the forks and shock body were sent to Japan for Kashima coating -Fork tubes and shock shaft were DLC-coated -SKF fork and shock seals were used along with a low friction piston band in the shock to lower stiction -The fork got the Kayaba “works” outdoor spring perches, pistons, and FC oil lock collars, along with CNC fork lugs from Italy and CNC fork caps along with FC pressure springs and .48kg fork springs - The rear suspension is helped by a Merge Racing knuckle. The rear shock also got “works” aluminum preload rings with bearings to prevent spring torsion and an increased volume bladder cap, and a 5.3kg titanium shock spring. A custom preload spacer and reshaping the exhaust were required to make the Ti spring work. -The steering damper was re-valved by Factory Connection to help with the cornering feel and it helped a lot along with the Merge knuckle 3. Engine Mods: -I tried 3 different exhaust systems and ended up with a hybrid of 2 different systems that I thought offered the lightest weight and best performance. I use a titanium header from Yoshimura and FMF’s 4.1 RCT titanium and carbon muffler - Injectioneering throttle body mod. this mod really makes the bike pull lower and smoother off the bottom especially when cracking open the throttle at low rpm -Air filter back fire screen removed, HRC injector mod, Simon choke mod, Split stream valve cover vent rerouting kit also help a little bit -Tokyo Mods fuel and ignition mapping (I use VP T4 racing fuel) - Moto Tassinari Air4orce airboot with the long velocity stack -Ron Hamp camshaft with decompression spring mod to reduce flame outs - Tokyo Mods cam chain tensioner -The clutch was replaced by a Rekluse EXP 3.0 set up to give the least engine breaking. Clutch pull is assisted by a Works Connection Pro perch -Rear sprocket was changed to 49 teeth to help the engine do its job - Boyesen Super Cooler water pump and CV4 Y-hoses that eliminate the restrictive fittings, and a higher pressure CV4 radiator cap - 2015 black valve cover secured with titanium bolts The above bods make for a bike that is quite strong from bottom to mid and really improved the throttle response which is important to me. 4. Brakes: - The front got the Moto Stuff 280mm brake rotor used by the Geico Honda team and a Ride Engineering front brake caliper. These 2 parts were made for each other and gives a front brake that is at a whole different level. A Pro Carbon front disc guard from the UK and an Acerbis wheel spacer to mount it -The rear also has a Moto Stuff lightweight brake rotor mounted with Ti bolts. There are IRP aluminum banjo bolts front and rear along with Race Tech titanium caliper pad and DLC-coated slider pins 5. Miscellaneous Parts/ Ergonomics: - There are a number of HRC parts on the bike including brake master cylinder covers, brake line brackets, lower engine mounts, and a set of HRC triple clamps that are a bit lighter than stock -The handlebars were raised 6mm using MXBONZ mounts -The foot pegs are relocated 5mm up and 5mm back - 15mm longer Hammerhead billet shift pedal was added to keep my size 10 boots from getting caught under the shifter whenever I upshifted while seat bouncing in the air which was a constant problem There is a smattering of other parts that I am sure I forgot to mention. Here is also a picture of a YZ144 I just built for my son. It has a Terry Varner motor and RG3 suspension… mike
  14. Tokyo_Tiddler

    Tokyo Mods Cam Chain Tensioner

    Update Guys.. nothing wrong whatsoever with the Tokyo Mods chain tensioner. I tried to figure this out all night.. I tried replacing it with the stock tensioner, looked all over for a bolt/ washer I might have left loose.. couldn't figure it out. Then I saw that the new RCS titanium shock spring that I just installed was just touching the exhaust pipe. You could not hear it on the right side/ exhaust side because of the sound of the exhaust, but the ringing sound was coming through the center of the bike, under the throttle body such that it seemed like it was coming from the cylinder where the timing chain is. I got out the torch, heated up the titanium exhaust until is was glowing orange and hammered in a 2-1/2" long indent to make clearance for the fatter coils of the titanium shock spring. Reinstalled, started her up and the engine is nice and quiet. I reinstalled the Tokyo Mods chain tensioner. All is good and sems like a fine product from Tokyo Mods! Yes, the engine shoudl be at TDC when you adjust because you want to make sure there is no compression in the cylinder pressing down on the piston as that will pull the cam chain tight and you wont be able to measure the chain tension accurately. I just saw this when I went to reinstall the Tokyo Mods tensioner.. the adjustment was very different than when I had it at TDC. I turned over the engine slightly and could hear the hiss of the built up compression releasing and the chain slack was back to normal again. mike
  15. Tokyo_Tiddler

    Tokyo Mods Cam Chain Tensioner

    They recommend a 2mm gap which I measured with a digital micrometer to be exact
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