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Tekime

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Everything posted by Tekime

  1. Tekime

    Made this for my son for Christmas

    Wonderful gift. You can't spoil your kids with love, never be afraid to tell them how important they are to you. My parents weren't into mechanical stuff at all, and wouldn't hear of it when I mentioned the idea of riding. So I was relegated to pretending I was riding through the woods next to my school bus on the two hours trip each day. Then life happened, I kind of filed it under "never gonna happen". Finally got myself a bike in my 30's and realized it was the solution to almost all of my problems, now I ride every chance I get, street or dirt, and have rebuild a bunch of bikes. It's impossible to explain to someone with no interest how something like a dirt bike can literally save you from yourself and transform your life. I think if I started a lot younger, it would have been an outlet that saved me from a lot of mistakes. But that's neither here nor there. My 11-year-old daughter has no interest aside from yelling at me when I forget my helmet! But that's fine, we share lots of other interests. The important part here is to take an interest in your kid's life and spend time with them. Even if it means getting down on the floor and playing with dolls for an evening! You have some lucky kids man.
  2. Tekime

    Engine break in myths tested

    Of course, having said that, for a two-stroke where you might trade a 150-hr top end for a 120-hr top end but pick up some extra power, hard break in might make more sense. Where rebuilds aren't as intense
  3. Tekime

    Engine break in myths tested

    I think it's more a question of longevity. Maybe fine for a race engine being rebuilt every season (or race) but for an average rider putting premature wear on a motor will show up many thousands of miles later and start losing power, eating oil, and costing $$$ I don't really have a stance on it, but tend to think a break-in is a safer more sensible way to go for 99% of riders. A truly rigorous test would be insanely expensive, and would have to monitor over a longer period of time and use more calculated load tests. 14 hours!!
  4. Tekime

    Engine break in myths tested

    Yes, bigger ring end gap on the harder ran bike
  5. Tekime

    Engine break in myths tested

    There's more to the video, but the Workshop points out flaws in the reported measurement tolerances, testing method, questionable motor history, why it can't be considered either rigorous or scientific, but of particular importance the fact that the video clearly states they found "no discernible difference" and then goes on to show the data which reports a clear difference in ring end gap. For 2,000 miles of testing, this is not insubstantial and not something you can ignore if you want to call it rigorous.
  6. Tekime

    Engine break in myths tested

    Was about to post this before I scrolled down ­čĄú Must watch both
  7. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Nice fix! I was real close to trying something similar with steel bar. Lucky mine wasn't on the pipe side. Just picked up the repaired subframe today and I'm very happy with it. The 3mm thick L bar worked perfect, just a bit more work. Had a small crack welded up too. Now to trim up the end and it should be ready to use
  8. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Yeah got a guy that's helping me out
  9. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Well, for comparison my HF wire feed was about $100, requires no gas or special setup, just runs out of the box and handles 95% of what I need it for. Even if I could get an AC TIG for 3-5x times that price, I'd have to get my shop wired for 240V and an Argon tank. Something I'll do eventually but it's far from simple or cheap compared to steel.
  10. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Attempting to fix my subframe. Just patching in 5" on the back, luckily the rest is solid. I don't have access to TIG (or the required skills..) so I'm prepping it for a local shop. As it turns out, literally nobody makes extruded square tube 6061/6063 aluminum in a 20x15mmx3mm thickness. So I got some 1/8" thick L bar and will fab up about 5" of square tube to weld in. Man, I wish there was an easy/affordable way to weld aluminum!
  11. Tekime

    2013 250xc parts recommendation

    You can gently pry off the fork dust seals with a small screwdriver. Pull them down by hand, clean carefully, then lube with bit of oil and re-seat them by hand. Primary Drive has some affordable sprockets with good reviews, check out rockymountainatv.com. I'm running SuperSprox rn but might try them just to taste some different gearing combos.
  12. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Then in 2021 the pitchforks come out!
  13. Tekime

    2003 ktm250sx blown

    Having flipped a number of machines and rebuilt a few bikes to ride, it's easy to lose money fast. But you can make out pretty well if you're patient and meticulous about it. $1,000 with serious engine problems is high for a bike that'll fetch maybe $1,500-2,000 in perfect condition. Maybe a good <$500 project if you have plans to ride it. Before I buy anything I lurk on Craigslist & FB marketplace so I *really* know what they are worth. Take the average asking price and subtract 20-25%, then you can comfortably guess what you'll be able to sell the bike for in excellent condition without sitting on it for months. Any bike 10+ years old is almost guaranteed to need more work than is immediately obvious. Gaskets, seals, bearings all get worn out. Especially with an enduro/MX bike that has probably been thrashed on for a decade. So you always want some wiggle room for extra bits & pieces, fluids, cables, etc. Chains/sprockets/rotors/pads all add up in cost as well. Patience and timing are key. When a really good deal comes up you need to catch it immediately and have cash in hand. The great deals go fast. If something has been on the market for several weeks and hasn't sold - you can be guaranteed there is a reason for it, usually it isn't a great deal. So anyway, just my $0.02 but there's definitely money in rebuilding but you need to be business about it. Be patient, inspect the machine up and down, know your market prices & costs for repairs, but know a deal when you see it and jump right on it. Also don't go halfway - a "ready to ride" bike is always going to fetch more money in resale because a surprising number of people can't/won't do their own repairs but they have cash and want a bike they can just fire up and ride away.
  14. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Woah! There are small brook crossings all over the place on our local trails. The section in that photo is usually a tiny creek but we've had *lots* of rain. Most of the larger brooks/streams have wooden bridges maintained by local clubs or towns. As long as you have a sticker & stay on the marked trails everyone is cool. I'm all for preserving the environment and local wildlife, but do worry that we'll just see more and more unreasonable regulation going forward.
  15. Tekime

    What Have You Done To Your KTM Today?

    Spent four hours beating on my pipe in a vain effort to straighten her out, fixed the silencer mounting, tightened/cleaned chain & tried some new Motorex cleaner & lube. Rode for four hours today - just a beautiful day. About 40┬░F with tons of rain here lately. Just had a blast in the water, leaves, ice. Have a bad head cold and I think it cured me for a few hours there.
  16. Tekime

    DR350SE transplant questions

    Nice. Very nice! I've yearned for a sight glass on my DR for years haha Be interesting to see how that pipe affects the motor/performance (if at all). Should be fairly quiet though.
  17. Tekime

    DR350SE transplant questions

    Well I know some guys run heated gear just fine - but a rad fan has a lot of pull. Your main load now would be coming from the headlight, depending on how much draw there I would think a suitable fan pulling 50-70W max would be just manageable unless you're spending a lot of time idling. Easy enough to test once she's running get your battery charged, wire in a fan and watch voltage drop at full draw. If you've still got close to 13V under power you should still be charging. A good battery and maybe LED lights might help ease things up? The 1990 S model I'm working on now can barely keep the headlight steady at idle without the battery, so yeah, they aren't pushing a ton of power but the battery helps a lot. It would be extra cool if you added a kickstarter lol ;)
  18. Tekime

    DR350SE transplant questions

    Awesome project, wow! That motor looks so good. I would definitely watch temp, and maybe oil pressure as well. If you're doing an external oil cooler, it might be easy to wire up a fan for some extra cooling. Download the service manual and look at section 4-7 in particular for oil pressure/flow diagram. Here's a flow cutaway I extracted from page 86 of my 1990 dirt-model service manual. Flow in/out of the case is fairly straightforward - you have two main lines, plus a hard line pushing oil on top of the gears.
  19. Tekime

    92 DR350 Dirt to Street Wiring Help!

    Right on! Just thought I might save you a few bucks. :) You might find the battery only charges when on the throttle, at least that was my experience. Going LEDs should help substantially. Those decal kits are crazy expensive, I haven't found many good deals myself. I crash my bike often enough to ruin any decent decals anyway so I stick with plasti-dip and whatever random stickers I have around. When I first finished my build I did some vinyl work, suffice to say it didn't last long, haha!
  20. Tekime

    92 DR350 Dirt to Street Wiring Help!

    I converted my 1990 DR350 dirt model to street here in Maine where we need *everything* (high/low, blinkers, independent front/rear brake lights, horn). I added a battery and used a Trail Tech Regulator/Rectifier with the stock dirt stator. It actually did okay but quickly decided to upgrade to a DR350S stator and VRR to get some extra juice for my Vapor speedo & charger. I still have the Trail Tech VRR in basically new condition I could probably sell ya. I might also have a good DR350S stator & VRR off a 1990 DR350S parts bike I'm disassembling now. Was going to keep it as a spare for my other S model but might put it up for sale. They're getting hard to come by I didn't see any on eBay last I looked... Its been a while since I did the conversion but I think there are some other cheap VRRs you can use with the dirt stator instead of the Trail Tech.
  21. Tekime

    250 XC-W Jetting

    ­čĹŹ Ordered a 35 & 38 yesterday.
  22. Tekime

    250 XC-W Jetting

    New to the 2-stroke world. Just got a 2006 KTM 250 XC-W. Well-used, but runs great. Starts up 1-2 kicks, crazy power. Original owner (not the previous owner) who I suspect ran enduros and ice racing is unreachable. Before I throw on new sprockets/chain/brakes and hit the trails, I've been cleaning and checking over everything. Checked all the carb settings and it's not exactly stock. Pilot: 40, Main: 162, Clip: 3 I'm about at sea level (100ft above), temps around 55-65F this time of year. Manual suggests 35/162/4 for my altitude & temp. Seems like there's a lot of spooge in the pipe - too rich? PO also said he mixed fuel sort of heavy like 40:1 and I was going to run 50:1. Main reason I'm asking is the original owner had obviously set the bike up for his needs. Sprockets were 12/48 and I'm not sure what else might have been done. The reed valve has a Boyesen sticker on it but I'm not sure if KTM uses these stock? Just looking for any input on if you would go back to stock settings or just send it!
  23. Tekime

    Cheap wheel bearings for KTM

    Good to know. Never tried Tusk bearings before.
  24. Tekime

    Cracked oil drain hole on case

    That's a tough one. A good welder might be able to build it up and make a new thread but it would have to be very clean, which means draining and cleaning the motor, probably flipping it upside down so trace oil doesn't continue to leak down. If you're desperate for a quick fix, I guess it wouldn't hurt to drain the oil, lay the bike on the side so remaining oil isn't seeping down, clean the surface extremely well with carb cleaner/brake cleaner, then use some SteelStik and screw the bolt back in before it cures fully. SteelStik is actually pretty tough stuff, but there's a good chance it won't create a perfect seal. Maybe enough to get some more riding out of it but it would be a long shot.
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