Coach Robb

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About Coach Robb

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    TT Health & Fitness Expert

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    Florida
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    Motorcycles have been my passion since 1978. I enjoy helping riders of all ages and abilities no matter what type of riding they enjoy. Please feel free to ask any question about nutrition, hydration, strength, endurance, flexibility or sports psychology relevant to riding! I look forward to answering all of your questions.

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  1. MotoE is once again opening and expanding its amateur racing sponsorship program for the 2018 race season beginning November 20th2017. Due to the success of both the MotoE Factory and Co-Factory Teams experienced in 2017, the 2018 sponsorship program will double in size and continue to consist of two levels of sponsorship: Full Factory & Co-Factory. Each rider chosen for the MotoE Factory Team (total of 6 riders) will receive 100% of their coaching fees covered (a $10,000 annual value) along with significant discounts on Coach Robb’s Nutritionally Green performance nutrition products including his extremely popular Energy Fuel. MotoE Co-Factory Team members (total of 20 riders) will receive 80% off their coaching fees covered (a $4,800 annual value), as well as discounts on Coach Robb’s nutrition products. Both Factory and Co-Factory Teams are being doubled in size for the 2018 season. “Last season we received just over 2200 resumes for our Co-Factory Team so we wanted to expand our sponsorship level to provide more riders the opportunity to gain access to our championship proven nutritional, performance and mental programs used by some of today’s top professionals and amateur national champions,” states MotoE Founder and Director of Human Performance Services, Robb Beams. "In 2017 the MotoE Factory team consisting of Jake Pinhancos, Joshua Gibbs and Stilez Robertson who dedicated themselves to the program resulted in multiple championships, as well as performances that were far above what we had projected for the 2017 race season,” commented Beams. "Our Co-Factory Team development vision was to improve the rider’s strength, endurance and overall speed to make them eligible for the MotoE Factory Team and ultimately a factory ride with a reputable team,” he added. This vison became reality when long time team member Isaac Teasdale was recently signed to the Babbitt’s/Monster Kawasaki AX Lites Team for the 2018 season. “Our focus again in 2018 is to provide amateur riders all over the world access to the same MotoE Blueprint of Success Performance Program that was created and implemented with our top amateurs and professionals over the last 33 years. Improving the rider’s speed, strength, endurance, flexibility, lean body mass and mental preparation to handle the physical and mental demands of high profile amateur racing will continue to be our focus,” says Beams. Applications will be reviewed and accepted thru December 29th 2017. Riders will be notified of their sponsorship level by January 5th2018 and will begin receiving their MotoE Blueprint for Success Performance Program the week of January 8th 2018. If you are dedicated to doing what is necessary to be a top amateur racer and possibly an amateur national champion (in any class), submit your updated race resume and 2018 race schedule for review to Contact@CoachRobb.com. No matter what class you race, where you race, or your past results, all resumes will be reviewed! MotoE (the world’s largest and most successful Human Performance Company) is a complete Motocross Performance Training company with a vision of developing good racers into championship level racers through proven nutrition, mental, fitness and performance programs. Led by Head Coach and Founder, Robb Beams, MotoE offers 33 years of success including four-time supercross and three-time motocross champion Ryan Dungey, and current pro riders Jeremy Martin, Adam Ciancirulio, Alex Martin, Isaac Teasdale, Tristan Charboneau and Mitchell Harrison. Current top amateur riders developed by MotoE’s Performance & Nutritional Program include Jordan Bailey, Lance Kobush, Jake Pinhancos, Stilez Robertson, Joshua Guffey and Dylan Greer. For more information, visit www.CompleteRacingSolutions.com
  2. During this show I answered the frequently debated question – “Should my maximum heart rate go up or down as I become fitter?” I also outlined what an Energy Matrix is and how training with a heart rate monitor will make you leaner, stronger and faster in the shortest amount of time. In addition to answering more listener questions, I also explained why strength training is a key component to improving your ability to burn fat, increase speed and reduce muscular fatigue. When you get a moment, make sure to follow me over on Youtube at Robb Beams to hear your questions answered in video format! Click here to download: https://www.dmxsradio.com/ Yours in health and sport, -Coach Robb
  3. As you capture more and more historical data, you are able to catch any deviations in your body’s ability to adapt to the stress of training. By consistently tracking your daily resting heart rate you are able to “catch” signs of fatigue, stress and even illness early and adjust your training accordingly to minimize the grip of the virus or stress. As a general rule of thumb, if your resting heart rate is up 3-5 beats over last week’s average, you need to keep your workouts strictly aerobic (this means NO weight lifting – it is anaerobic) and the duration to less than a hour. If your heart rate is up 6 beats or more over last week’s average, you need to go back to bed (if logistically possible) and use your normal “training time” as “recovery time”. Use this “recovery time” for eating, stretching and mental development – the non-sweating performance elements of your program. It is always better to give up one or two days of training then to “push through the stress or virus” only to be set back 7-10 days. Please keep in mind that an elevated heart rate associated with high intensity/volume training is normal and is part of the adaptation process when supported with proper amounts of food & sleep. The key is to evaluate how your body “absorbs” such a workout. By listening to your body and following your bio-feedback (resting heart rate, body weight and quality of sleep) provides you direct feedback that what you are doing (training and recovery wise) is working. Remember, Work Smart - Not Hard! -Coach Robb
  4. Over Training Indicators include: mood swings; craving of simple sugar; interrupted sleep; loss of libido; loss of body weight; suppressed appetite & elevated resting heart rate. Once you have reached the point of over training and are experiencing associated symptoms, your satisfaction associated with training becomes less rewarding and ultimately affects other elements in your life (relationships, work, etc.) along with having a negative effect on your performance (which ironically makes you think you need to do more or work harder!). Training creates adaptations within the body's various systems (muscular, cardio-pulmonary, lymphatic, nervous and connective) and needs to be supported with rest and food for positive adaptations. Inadequate amounts (and quality) of sleep and food set the body up for a physical break down which leads to negative effects on the body (i.e. suppressed immune system and muscles with less power and endurance). In addition to adaptations within the body's systems, training causes changes at a cellular level. Dr. Sandler notes that cell mitochondria swell, metabolic wastes accumulate, essential nutrients (particularly electrolytes and stored glycogen) deplete, and muscle tissue is torn. This tearing is known as micro trauma of the cells, and torn muscle tissue doesn't work efficiently. As popularly noted, it takes 48 hours for the body to recover from this micro-trauma and has to be supported with rest and food for proper recovery and improved overall health. If your body doesn't get the opportunity to rebuild from the "work phase" of training, overall health and associated performance begin to slow down (and in extreme circumstances, cease all together). The concept of hard training days followed with easy-active recovery days incorporated into your weekly training schedule establishes the balance necessary for incremental improvements in your overall health and ultimately your performance. Consistent training without physical or mental setbacks provides the foundation for your body to absorb larger volumes of training. The larger the foundation (i.e. quality of overall health) the quicker you will recover from workouts and the quicker your body will progress to the next level of health & ultimately performance. Think about it this way, if you are not fresh, you will not have the energy (or desire) to push to the next level of performance. If your body doesn't experience the next level you will begin to stagnate within your performance cycles. So what will it be this weekend - big workout or some down time to recover? Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb
  5. The October MotoE-Coach Robb Newsletter is now available for download. CLICK HERE and learn: 1. Planning for the 2018 season of riding and racing. 2. How much fluid should you consume on a daily basis? 3. How to build lean muscle mass? 4. Why you are exercising but still gaining weight? 5 How to deal with post race depression. 6. Difference between a pain site and a pain source. 7. The importance of building an aerobic base. If you would like to receive Coach Robb's newsletter monthly in your email, please visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com and subscribe at the top of the landing page. Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb Note: If the link above doesn't work for you, please copy and paste the following into your browser: http://conta.cc/2gkBdVZ
  6. Frequently I discuss the importance of proper hydration and nutrition as it relates to building and repairing muscle tissue, burning unwanted body fat and consuming enough water, sugar and electrolytes to perform optimally every day when you head out the door. With this in mind, I want you to begin keeping a very detailed analysis of your sweat rate. Nutrition as it relates to performance is an interesting subject; we look at the quality and quantity of your food intake and evaluate if you have enough energy to finish your workouts feeling strong throughout the duration of the workout. If you begin to fatigue, we know that we need to adjust the quantity (we assume that the quality is there at this point). Now let’s take a detailed look at your hydration as it relates to your performance. Proper hydration is going to affect your body in two ways: one, it helps you regulate your core body temperature. The cooler you are from the inside out, the better you will perform. The second benefit to proper hydration is that your muscles (and brain) are receiving enough water, electrolytes and sugar to perform properly: good mental clarity and strong muscle contractions. To improve your confidence on race day, you need to know what your sweat/replenishment rate is specific to your intensity with the factor of temperature & humidity. Though it sounds tedious during the week, it is invaluable on race day – you will know exactly what your hydration strategy to implement to race up to your fullest potential. Until next time, work smart - not hard! -Coach Robb
  7. Dating back to 1775 and the research completed by a biochemist by the name of Joseph Priestly, it was discovered the importance of oxygen associated with sustaining life. Ironically, he also discovered the dangers associated with the utilization of oxygen as it related to health and wellness. As you breathe and your body utilizes stable oxygen (O2) molecules, and converts them to a free radical molecule. Scientists now associate oxygen free radicals with every major chronic disease, including heart disease and even cancer. Free radicals play a major role in the gaining process. It is important to become aware of these potentially harmful substances, what increases their production and how to control them in order to reduce the negative effects on your health, performance and the aging process. Increases in oxidative stress, whether from too much free-radical production, too little antioxidant activity, or both, speeds up the aging process. According to Dr. Maffetone, different levels of exercise intensity can produce varying amounts of free radicals. Low intensity aerobic training (according to your personal heart rate zones), produce little or insignificant amounts of free radicals, and the smaller amount is more than likely well controlled through the body’s natural defense system, especially if enough antioxidants are present. A well-developed aerobic system has its own antioxidant effect. Fat burning and free radical breakdown occur in the mitochondria contained within aerobic muscle fibers. With this in mind, people in better aerobic shape are more capable of controlling free radicals compared to those who are out of shape. Research validates that individuals with a higher percentage of aerobic muscle fibers have more antioxidant production and therefore more antioxidant capabilities. However, exercising at high intensity levels (above HR Z4) and lifting weights can have the opposite effect. Such intense activity produces more oxidative stress – some research indicate as high as 120% over resting levels. This is the result of physical damage to muscles, lactic-acid production and highter oxygen uptake, which may increase tenfold during activity. Higher injury rates are also associated with increased free radical production. Additionally, the development of more anaerobic muscle fibers means less aerobic mitochondria for free radical elimination. This is (amongst others) why you will see the majority of your weekly volume based on aerobic effort. Understanding intensity levels and their influence on your health, wellness and ultimately performance is another tool for Working Smart, Not Hard! Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb
  8. Mistake #1: Not knowing YOUR sport specific heart rate training zone Your maximum heart rate number changes specific to the sport that you are training and racing. For example, your maximum heart rate on the motorcycle will be higher than on a bicycle (because of the amount of muscle you are using). A frequent mistake athletes make is completing a maximum heart rate assessment within one discipline and then use the established heart rate training zones across all forms of training and racing. An additional mistake is using the generic algorithms that are programed into heart rate monitors. When you plug in your age, height, body weight and activity level, the watch is programmed to provide you GENERIC heart rate zones. The most accurate assessment of your maximum heart rate is to complete field testing every 6 – 8 weeks. Solution #1: Complete Sport Specific Time Trials and Determine Your Maximum Heart Rate [Note: your maximum heart rate varies from sport to sport – the more muscle you utilize, the higher your heart rate] Your maximum heart rate changes as your aerobic engine improves. The stronger your aerobic base, the lower your resting heart rate. With this being said, your maximum heart rate will come down as well because the heart can pump the necessary amounts of oxygenated blood to the working muscles at a lower number because it is “stronger” and pumps more volume of blood with each beat. Over the duration of my career, I have found the following field tests as a solid indicator of maximum heart rate along with muscular endurance: Swimming: 500 yards (capture your interval at each 100 yard interval) Cycling: 10 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at the five mile and ten mile mark) Running: 3 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at each mile marker) For physical strength, I have a customized Plyometric routine that I feel tests your lactate tolerance and anaerobic thresholds. This test is EXTREMELY difficult and requires a doctor’s approval. If you have your doctor’s approval and would like a copy of this Plyometric Assessment, please email me directly. Mistake #2: Not Testing and Evaluating Your Training Efforts Correctly When you complete your maximum heart rate assessments through time trials, you want to make sure that you are not fatiguing the muscles too quickly which keep you from accurately testing the strength of your heart (specifically oxygen volume as it fuels your working muscles with oxygenated blood). Keep in mind that there is a difference between muscular endurance and muscular power. If you muscles fatigue due to excessive load or exertion, you will not push your heart into its upper limits. The key is knowing how to evaluate your time trial results. Below mistake number three, I will outline testing protocols along with how to evaluate them correctly. Solution #2: Allow for an Adequate Warm Up When you are attempting to test your aerobic engine, you need to make sure that you don’t increase your intensity too quickly for two reasons. First: the muscles need adequate time to warm up (usually 20-30 minutes) so that you don’t use the first half of your assessment as your “warm up”. Second: trying to hit maximum effort too early. The idea is to see what your maximum is over the entire duration, not the first five minutes. Mistake #3: Following a Generic Training Plan Following a generic training plan that doesn’t take into consideration your training background, physical abilities and availability of time to train will lead to performance plateaus, illness and injuries. Within our performance programs, we factor in your testing results, physical limiters (see Mistake #2), goals and objectives as we develop your training program. Too frequently I interview new clients who are frustrated with their last year of training and racing because they don’t see any improvements despite the consistency in their training. The reason for this is that the efforts are not being quantified and the athlete spends too much time in the “grey zone” that yields little to no improvements in performance. Solution #3: Begin Following a Scientifically Backed Training Program If you would like to begin maximizing your training efforts, please email me and let’s get a nutrition & performance program built for you ASAP! I guarantee that you will burn body fat, build muscle and improve both your speed and endurance in as little as 12 weeks. Stop the insanity of training without a plan and email me today. Mistake #4: Not Eating Enough Fat, Protein and Raw Fruits & Vegetables Many athletes become fat and protein phobic because of the misinformation that is floating around on the internet and morning shows. The truth of the matter is that the body needs more protein and fat than you can even begin to imagine. Simply put, lean protein re-builds torn down muscle. If you want to build more muscle you have to eat protein. Lean protein also supports your immune system which helps protect you against viruses and being down and out being sick. Clean fat will help your body recover from the oxidative stress of aerobic exercise (at all intensity levels). Eating raw fruits and vegetables will provide your body with the necessary vitamins and minerals to both produce energy as well as recover from your daily training. Solution #4: Begin Eating More Protein, Fat and Raw Vegetables & Fruits to Burn Body Fat and Improve Your Speed & Endurance The only two things that satisfy appetite is fat and protein – NOTHING ELSE. If you are on a low fat, low protein diet, you will never experience the true feeling of being full. This will negatively affect your ability to sleep (which makes you gain weight because your body doesn’t have the chance to release human growth hormone (hGH) which is responsible for making you lean). The key to burning fat and building muscle is to satisfy your appetite so that you can sleep deeply (REM patter three). When you get to REM pattern three your body rejuvenates from the inside out and allows your body to release human growth hormone naturally – you will wake up both refreshed and leaner. However, it starts with real, raw fruits, vegetables, high quality fats and lean protein. You can now see that by training with a scientific, yet simplistic approach will yield the long-term results that you have been always wanting. I look forward to hearing from each of you and how me and my staff can help you and your program. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb About Coach Robb and MotoE (CompleteRacingSolutions.com) Coach Robb has been working with riders and racers since 1987 and is the founder of the Complete Racing Solutions Performance System, the Mental Blueprint of Success, the MotoE Amateur Development Program, the MotoE Educational Series and a nutritional consultant to Nutritionally Green Supplements based out of Orlando Florida. CompleteRacingSolutions.com is a premium resource center for motocross, supercross and GNCC riders of all abilities and ages. Visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com & subscribe to his monthly newsletter that outlines the training solutions used by Factory KTM/Red Bull Ryan Dungey, Geico Honda's Jeremy Martin, Factory KTM/Red Bulll Alix Martin, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Adam Cianciarulo, multi-time Loretta Lynn & Mini O Amateur Champion Jordan Bailey (Factory Rockstar/Husqvarna), Factory KTM/Red Bull Broc Tickle, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Stilez Robertson, off road riders Charlie Mullins (Factory KTM/Red Bull), Chris Bach and Ryan Overton along with quad racer Roman Brown (Factory Yamaha) along with thousands of riders all around the world who have families, hold full time jobs and just love to ride and race motorcycles. Instructional videos with Coach Robb can be found on the Coach Robb’s YouTube Channel addressing rider’s questions about speed, endurance, strength, nutrition, biomechanics, stretching, and soft tissue maintenance. You can also find articles and videos at CompleteRacingSolutions.com relevant to riders of all abilities. If you are into social media, you can find him on Twitter: @MotoCoachRobb, Instagram: CoachRobbBeams and Facebook: Coach Robb. If you are into podcasts, CLICK HERE for his first three shows where he outlined: How to Eat Healthy on $10 a Day; Importance of Sleep and It's Influence on Weight Loss; The Dangers of Over-Hydrating.
  9. The mindset of “No Pain, No Gain” is frequently found with athletes and racers who train too hard and/or too long and find themselves actually getting slower, frequently injured and experience feeling of burn out (tired, not interested in riding, suppressed appetite, etc.). By breaking down the year into specific training “cycles”, the body is provided the correct combination of work and rest which creates a faster and stronger racer. Once this delicate balance is obtained, and speeds are improving on the track, racers now have to endure something called “Pain or discomfort” to break through to new levels of speed consistently. Humans by nature will take the pass of least resistance when it comes to survival; however, when you look at past champions (at any level of racing), they have learned how to deal with pain and discomfort as they address any physical limitations keeping them from being dominate. For example, many people think that Adam Cianciarulo is fast because of his motors and suspension; however, I can tell you that when I was working with Adam Cianciarulo (Note: I lost working with him due to his professional contract with Pro Circuit) he is one of the most dedicated and hardest working racers I have ever had the privilege of working with. During my time with AC, he had Zack Freeburg living & training with him and AC would literally look at Zack and tell him “you might as well quit, because I won’t” and guess what, he didn’t. Ten years later, AC’s hard work, dedication and acclimation to pain and discomfort is what makes him the future of our sport (not that the bike Mitch has built for him is slowing him down at all!). In addition to developing your strength, endurance & sprint speed, you must be able to handle though times in racing when racing simply hurt, it is the single limiting factor on race day. It is what happens within your mind when you face pain and your body begins to rebel and your mind wanders into the area of self doubt and insecurity that will dictate just how fast and how well you will race. Let’s take a look at a few things you can do to improve your “pain tolerance”. Here are 7 Rules for an improving your pain tolerance: Rule #1: Identify your Goals & Objectives When the training and racing becomes difficult it is easy to become mentally distracted by the pain and ultimately become afraid or intimidated to continue. With all of our riders, we have them establish 3, 6 and 12-month goals, and then outline 3-5 objectives that must be completed to make the overall goal a reality. The most difficult part of this exercise is that many people say that they want to be successful, but fail to identify what work needs to be done to make the goal a reality. For example, a goal like “I want to be fast” is not measureable. Saying that you want to “Increase my consistency to 1 second over a 10-lap race” is measurable and trainable. If you haven’t received my MotoE Goals & Objectives module, please email me directly. Rule #2: Identify your Physical Limiters by testing yourself every 5 to 6 weeks The best athletes & racers test themselves regularly to evaluate what their physical & mental weaknesses are (both on and off of the track). If you are not good at opening lap sprinting (i.e. you come on strong the second half of the moto) you probably don’t complete many interval workouts on the Concept 2 Rower or 2 lap sprints at the track. Why: because you don’t like them! However, the quickest way to improve your sprint speed is to train the energy system specific to sprinting (i.e. lactate tolerance). By testing yourself every 5 – 6 weeks (depending on the time of the season), both on and off the track, you are able to evaluate if what you have been doing over the last four to five weeks is actually moving you closer to your overall goals (see above). Though this sounds obvious, think about when you last tested your sprint speed, muscular endurance, strength levels, flexibility and sweat rate? If you would like a testing assessment (both on and off of the track) for all of these performance variables, please email me directly. Rule #3: Train to remove your Physical Limiters After you identify your physical limiters (see Rule #2), each workout needs to address your physical limiter. As mentioned in Rule #1, as humans, we train what we are good at and avoid what we don’t like (and not good at). Too frequently I see dedicated riders heading to the track, gym, jumping on a Concept 2 rower or the open road on their road bike without any focus; if you don’t begin a workout with a specific mental focus on the physical change associated with the workout (i.e. improved sprint speed, enhanced endurance or consistency); you miss the opportunity to eliminate the gap between your mental goals and your physical ability. Rule #4: Build Pain Tolerance with Difficult Workouts When building workouts for my clients, every 10 days I introduce a workout that is not only difficult, but also, scary! These key workouts are designed to be more difficult than an actual race (both in duration and intensity). By learning how to adapt and overcome pain and discomfort translates into race day confidence knowing that the race is actually “easier” than training during the week. For example, with our riders I will ask them what kind of conditions do they hate riding in: dry and blue groove or wet and sloppy? If they say that they hate dry and blue groove, we go out of our way to find tracks to ride that force the rider to “learn to adapt” to the skills necessary to ride dry, blue groove tracks. Though it isn’t always convenient, it built both the physical skill set along with the mental confidence knowing that there isn’t a condition that the rider can’t ride well in. Rule #5: Create Race Day Simulation Again, this rule is a little difficult to implement, but yields huge dividends on race day. By identifying the specific aspects of the race that are mentally and physically demanding, you will become more familiar of what you need to put in place to address an distressing situations (upset stomach, riding tight, etc.). As you begin to eliminate the negative effects with a specific plan, you have a “blueprint” that you can implement the morning of high priority races to race to your fullest potential. Within our MotoE Mental Blueprint Program, we refer to this as the familiarity principle where your race day strategy has been tried and proven to create the desired results on race day - this eliminates the situation where one race goes well and another goes less than ideal. Rule #6: Train & Race Prepared In addition to starting each workout understanding the purpose of the workout and the physical limiter that is being addressed, maximize your training efforts by being well hydrated, fed, and rested (as indicated by your resting heart rate). When you bring all of these elements into a workout, you are now in a position to elevate your intensity, push your duration and the mental focus to implement the skills and drills to handle higher rates of speed. Think about the first time you were able to clear an intimidating double or blitz the whoops in third gear, completing the challenge the first time was intimidating, but trying it a second time is even more intimidating. If you are tired, hungry and thirsty, your chances of success are minimal. If you are still struggling with what to eat and how much to drink, please email me directly. and I will send you some tools to eliminate the guess work. Rule #7: Learn From Every Race After a high-quality training session or race, sit down with a blank piece of paper and outline the race in three steps. Step 1: What went well and why? Step 2: What didn’t go well and why? Step 3: Of the elements that didn’t go well, what can you control, what can’t you control? Reviewing step three is where you have the opportunity to “learn” from your weekend. For example, you may note that it wasn’t a good race because it rained. You can’t control the rain; however, you can train in wet and muddy conditions to improve both your skills and confidence. If you didn’t like a particular element of the track, say deep ruts, you now realize what you should be working on the next time you head to the track – deep ruts. By improving your skills associated with deep ruts, eliminates the self-inflicted pain and intimidation of deep ruts which results in faster lap times. Though it may sound like a cliché, I preach to my riders all the time – Work Smart, Not Hard! If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please feel free to email me directly at Robb@CoachRobb.com.
  10. The best way to boost your testosterone is to implement strength training and eat real, raw food. I am not a big fan of synthetic forms of anything; however, it is sometimes necessary - hence the suggestions of doctors to help make things better. I prefer food and exercise to keep things healthy. Please let me know if you have any questions or need anything clarified. -Coach Robb
  11. It has been a few years now since Lance Armstrong appeared on TV and admitted to his, and his teams, use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDS). To say that there was an awareness of PEDS influencing the race results of the Tour de France is an understatement; however, to the extent that past racers and champions have admitted to using PEDS (both regarding the type and amounts) is frightening. In this article, I thought I would provide a recap of the most popular PEDS and how you can get the same performance results in a healthy and natural way. Note: Your body produces these substances naturally in the body, the key to optimum health and performance is to maintain a high quality & quantity of healthy blood through clean eating and controlled training efforts (volume, intensity and frequency). Drug: Erythropoietin (pronounced, ah-rith-ro-poy-tin, and abbreviated, EPO) What EPO Does Within the Body Erythropoietin (pronounced, ah-rith-ro-poy-tin, and abbreviated, EPO) is a relatively recent entry into the deceitful pursuit of glory. EPO is a protein hormone produced by the kidney. After being released into the blood stream it binds with receptors in the bone marrow, where it stimulates the production of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Medically, EPO is used to treat certain forms of anemia (e.g., due to chronic kidney failure). Logically, since EPO accelerates erythrocyte production it also increases oxygen carrying capacity. Side Effects of EPO: Death In the 1990s, there was a spate of sudden deaths associated within the cycling world associated with EPO: Marco Ceriani (16 years old), Johan Sermon (21 YO), Fabrice Salanson (23 YO), Marco Rusconi (24 YO), Jose Maria Jimenez (32), Denis Zanette (32 YO), Marco Pantani (34 YO), Michel Zanoli (35 YO). This negative publicity was at least part of the reason for the clamping down on EPO use, which was rampant at the time. The reason that EPO, and transfusion blood doping, is dangerous is because of increased blood viscosity. Basically, whole blood consists of red blood cells and plasma (water, proteins, etc.). The percentage of whole blood that is occupied by the red blood cells is referred to as, the hematocrit. A low hematocrit means dilute (thin) blood, and a high hematocrit mean concentrated (thick) blood. Above a certain hematocrit level whole blood can sludge and clog capillaries. If this happens in the brain it results in a stroke. In the heart, a heart attack. Unfortunately, this has happened to several elite athletes who have used EPO. EPO use is especially dangerous to athletes who exercise over prolonged periods. A well-conditioned endurance athlete is more dehydration resistant than a sedentary individual. The body accomplishes this by several methods, but one key component is to “hold on” to more water at rest. Circulating whole blood is one location in which this occurs and, thus, can function as a water reservoir. During demanding exercise, as fluid losses mount, water is shifted out of the blood stream (hematocrit rises). If one is already starting with an artificially elevated hematocrit then you can begin to see the problem -- it is a short trip to the critical “sludge zone”. Additional dangers of EPO include sudden death during sleep, which has killed approximately 18 pro cyclists in the past fifteen years, and the development of antibodies directed against EPO. In this later circumstance, the individual develops anemia as a result of the body’s reaction against repeated EPO injections. There are some other reasons why cyclists might be predisposed to sudden death - riding at high intensities when carrying viral infections (as pro athletes tend to do) is one of them. And, as Ryan Shay, and a number of other high-profile cases have shown recently, sudden death is a tragic, but not completely uncommon event. There are reports that Nolf’s cardiogram was normal, but even that are not a guarantee of health, because those tests can often miss the quite rare conditions that cause sudden death in athletes. Source: click here How to improve the quality & production of red blood cells naturally With a balanced diet of fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein sources, your body will produce the blood chemistry necessary to perform at an elite level. Determining the optimal amount of protein, carbohydrates and fats that an individual need for optimal health and performance is beyond the scope of this article; however, I want you to know how to create healthy red blood cells. Natural Eating Solution: eat high quality protein along with high quality brown bread with real butter. The protein will provide your body with iron (helps form hemoglobin which carries oxygen in the bloodstream from the lungs to the muscles & brain) and the brown bread will provide you B vitamins (also referred to as Energy Vitamins). An additional benefit of eating protein and brown bread is that the bread with improve your absorption of the iron. Drug: Human Growth Hormone (hGH) What HGH Does Within the Body hGH is stored in a pea sized ball called the pituitary gland and is the primary stimulus to muscle & muscle strength, bone growth & bone strength, tendon growth & tendon strength, injury repair and mobilization of body fat for use as energy. Warning: this gets technical, but necessary to fully understand this process. The key to overall health and performance is to stimulate your own production of growth hormone and you accomplish this by stimulating the pituitary gland correctly. The pituitary is stimulated to release growth hormone by another hormone circulation in the brain called somatocrinin. Levels of somatocrinin can be increased by increasing levels of brain neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters are the chemicals that carry information from one nerve to another. Their activity constitutes your mind, your consciousness and dreams. To increase neurotransmitters, you have to get the amino acids that influence them past what is called the blood-brain barrier. This concept is beyond the scope of this article, but what needs to be discussed here is an amino acid, Tryptophan, which is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Serotonin is a compound that slows down brain activity during rest & sleep. Shortly after you fall asleep, your pituitary gland releases a burst of growth hormone. Source: Optimum Sports Nutrition, Dr. Michael Colgan. Side Effects of Synthetic hGH External side effects of synthetic hGH include: intense wrist nerve pain, diabetes, overgrowth of the facial bones, gaps between the teeth as the jawbone widens, development of a fatter nose, thickened bone above the eyes resembling an ape and excessive hair growth. Internal side effects include stressed liver, thyroid & pancreas symptoms, diabetes and historically die prior to the age of 60. How to improve the production of hGH naturally As mentioned above, the largest growth homone release occurs 30-60 minutes after falling asleep along with high intensity exercise (within moderate volume levels). To take advantage of these normal physiological functions, racers need to increase the duration and quality of sleep and monitor exercise durations and intensity levels. Ideally, racers should train twice daily, mid morning and early afternoon and take a nap immediately after training. Remember, each time you rest, your body receives a burst of growth hormone naturally. Natural Eating Solution: consume a high-quality smoothie that contains a high quality whey protein prior to sleeping and napping. Research has shown that the production of hGH can improve by up to 300% when high quality whey protein is consumed before resting. Drug: Testosterone What Testosterone Does Within the Body Testosterone has two distinct modes of action, androgenic (masculinizing) and anabolic (tissue building). Up to a certain level of testosterone in your body, a level that varies widely with biochemical individuality, the androgenic action produces more maleness, broader features, more hair, deeper voice, and larger sex organs. Along with it, the anabolic action produces larger muscles and greater strength. Side Effects of Synthetic or Excessive Testosterone If you take synthetic or excessive testosterone, the androgenic action turns nasty (aggression, violent anxiety, paranoia, and manic-depressive reactions). Additional negative side effects are irreversible baldness, overgrowth of the prostate, (which chokes the bladder and requires a catheter in order to urinate), acne (the blood fails to contain the excess hormone and overloads the sebaceous glands), impotence, shrinkage of testicles, cardiovascular disease and cancer. How to improve the production of testosterone naturally Sleep 8-10 hours; eat high quality fruits, vegetables and high-quality protein. Control your exercise intensity & volume to avoid over stressing your body. Natural Eating Solution: eat foods that are high in boron, zinc, vitamin C, branched chain amino acids and maximize the release of growth hormone. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestion for a future article, hit me up on the comments section below. I enjoy hearing from you. Oh, and don't forget to tap that "Follow" button so that you're notified when I post new tips on reaching your highest potential. Coach Robb Beams Complete Racing Solutions
  12. Hi coach Rob, I had a crash twisting my knee (over rotating) .Seen a dr as its just not right he says its a torn miniscus ,but does'nt know how bad without me having an MRI scan ! Is that normal ,will it heal itself ? He also says after the MRI he will know if i need an operation or just treatment !!Sound right? I can do most things but if i catch it wrong it hurts but does'nt swell up.Lastly he said NO cycling ,running ,swimming etc .I trained all winter and have missed a race already can i keep riding and live with the pain until the end of my race calender ?Thanks for any light you can shed on this it feels like a little injury but the dr has worried mr a little ..

  13. Tbahr-thanks for reading and commenting! You are exactly correct - managing your energy expenditure is a key ingredient to not overheating. If you have read any of my articles, you know that I am an advocate for the HR monitor to keep an accurate assessment of how hard the body is working to ride and manage heat. I really like the idea of having your hydration pack to tap into. I have my riders freeze the hydration pack - half full and then the morning of the ride, put cold water in. This serves to keep the core body temp down as long as possible and provide you the coldest fluids possible when you hydrate. Thanks again for reading and let me know if I can help your riding fitness, nutrition or hydration in any way. -Coach Robb
  14. Months of training can quickly be erased if an athlete is not properly prepared for the expected weather conditions on race day. Since few of us have the luxury of putting our jobs and lives on hold and traveling to our key event four weeks early to acclimate, here are 10 key things that will help you endure the heat and realize your full potential on race day. 1. Boost Your Fitness The best performances in the heat tend to come from the athletes with the best fitness. The effects of the heat are exponentially multiplied when an athlete's physiology is already struggling with the workload. Even under the best conditions, heat production in the muscles increases with the intensity of activity. Arriving at the starting line in a state of peak fitness will not only set you up for maximum performance, but it will also enable you to manage heat stress better through greater efficiency (hence less heat produced at any given pace) and high blood plasma volume (hence a greater ability to transport heat away from the muscles). These factors lead to a lower core temperature, thus minimizing heat stress and discomfort. 2. Acclimatize One of the best ways to acclimatize is to travel to your race location well in advance of your event. But this involves added expense and time away. Fortunately, you can acclimatize to almost any environment from your home. Start at least three weeks before your race by doing regular 60- to 90-minute indoor sessions of cycling, running, elliptical or Concept 2 rower at a low to moderate effort. Turn up the heat, limit the airflow and, if possible, add a humidifier. This will elevate your core temperature, resulting in an increased sweat and heart rate. Do this for five consecutive days, then, over the course of the next two weeks, be sure to repeat the session for at least 30 minutes, twice per week. The results of heat acclimation seem to be cumulative, so if you have the opportunity to train in the heat earlier in the year at home, at another hot venue or at your race site, it should help you in the long term. 3. Determine Your Sweat Rate Calculating your sweat rate is the most effective method of determining how much fluid you are losing and need to replenish. You may find that your sweat rate is different depending upon the discipline, effort level and environmental conditions. You should try to simulate the environmental conditions of your key race and your race effort. In order to determine your sweat rate, weigh yourself without clothes before and immediately after exercise and account for any fluid consumed. An accurate scale will be required, and you will need to avoid going to the toilet until the measuring is completed. 4. Hydrate Body fluids such as blood are made up of mostly water and electrolytes. Muscle is comprised of 75 percent water; therefore, it should come as no surprise that a loss of two to three percent of bodyweight due to sweating can significantly reduce athletic performance. It has been well demonstrated that athletes, when training or racing, only replace about 50 percent of fluid losses; thus, despite our best efforts, slight dehydration is unavoidable in some circumstances. To ensure you are well hydrated before an event, drink 10 to 25 ounces (250 to 750ml) of Nutritionally Green’s Energy Fuel (which I helped develop) and/or water two to three hours before the event. One hour before exercise, drink 10 to 18 ounces (250 to 500ml) of water, then do not drink again until after you visit the toilet 10 to 15 minutes before start time. Finally, consume another 8 to 10 ounces (250ml) of water, which will be absorbed as you start your effort and will never reach the bladder. During the race, aim to consume eight to 10 ounces (200 to 250ml) of Energy Fuel (which contains electrolytes) every 15 to 20 minutes. 5. Always Include Electrolytes Salt is comprised of sodium and chloride, also known as electrolytes. Electrolytes help in the absorption and retention of water. As the duration of exercise extends beyond one hour, electrolyte replacement becomes increasingly important. If you notice salt on your clothing after workouts you are probably a "salty sweater" and should pay careful attention to electrolyte intake. If you are heading into a hot race, eat saltier foods the week before the race and add additional salt to your meals (after receiving prior approval from your doctor). Salt pills can also be used during the race. 6. Up Your Carbs Hot conditions tend to increase the body's need for fuel. The amount needed will vary with size of the athlete, but generally speaking you should aim for a minimum of 300 calories and 70 grams of carbs per hour. 7. Make a Plan The best way to incorporate your hydration, nutrition and electrolyte consumption into a sensible routine is to make a plan. You may want to have a plan for different scenarios based on different environmental conditions. Practice these plans in training. Below is a sample plan. 8. Wear Cool Clothing Light colors will enable an athlete to remain cooler than if he or she chose dark clothing. In addition, a looser fit and lighter fabric increases air circulation and helps to wick sweat away from the body. Wet clothing actually speeds up evaporation, cooling the athlete more quickly than if he or she were to change into dry clothes. 9. Develop Cooling Strategies Remember that it is better for cooling to put a fluid in you than on you, but ideally you can do both. External cooling can be achieved by using cold water, ice or sponges in critical areas such as the back of the head, neck and chest. In very humid conditions you may want to wipe the sweat off because the air is too saturated to do the job for you. Sunglasses can ease stress on the eyes. 10. Rehydrate and Recover Effective recovery will help you become faster and stronger as your body adapts and super-compensates. Within the first 20 minutes after exercise, rehydrate with at least two to three cups of Energy Fuel for every pound of body weight lost. Lower your body temperature as soon as possible by moving to a cooler area out of the sun with access to water and ice. It is also important to replace your glucose stores with easily digestible foods, such as fruit. Try to get a full meal including complex carbohydrates and proteins within two to three hours following the activity. Following these guidelines will maximize your performance in the heat. Remember to keep cool, get the calories you need and keep hydrating. It will take some effort, but the results are well worth it. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please don’t hesitate to drop me an email (Robb@CoachRobb.com). Yours in sport and health, Coach Robb Beams http://www.completeracingsolutions.com/ Follow my blog on TT, "Speed Through Fitness"
  15. The key to maximizing your productivity within your workouts is to be hitting the exact duration and intensity levels necessary to address your identified weaknesses. Each workout’s elements (duration and intensity) are created to stress the body in a manner that creates a stimulation at the hormonal (aka human growth hormone), the aerobic (larger oxygen uptake) and muscular level (development of new muscle) resulting in faster speed and enhanced endurance in a shorter period of time. Please keep in mind that if you push beyond the necessary duration and/or intensity levels, you are pushing the body into a zone that can become counterproductive and negatively affect your speed and endurance – this fine line is the difference between being fit & razor sharp or being over trained, fatigued, sick and/or injuried. Also, by keeping a close eye on your resting heart rate and your body weight in the morning (utilize the Body Analysis spreadsheet – email me), you have two of the key indicators to evaluate how your body is adapting to stress of training on a daily basis. By keeping detailed logs of your food & body analysis information, you are able to adjust your training & eating habits to turn the body from a catabolic (tear down mode) to an anabolic mode (growth and improvement). It cannot be emphasized enough the impact your eating and sleeping habits have to your health, wellness and ultimately your performance results. Finally, if logistically possible, please set up an appointment with your physician and have your blood drawn (request a full panel) so that your physician can review the health of your blood chemistry. By reviewing your blood panel every 12 weeks, we can evaluate the effectiveness of your training, eating and sleeping patterns. If any of these three variables become out of balance, you run the risk of becoming over-trained and the associated side effects: fatigue, decreased speed & endurance, irritability, depression, etc. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email me! Remember, Work Smart, Not Hard! Yours in sport & health, -Coach Robb, Coaches and Staff