kevvyd

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About kevvyd

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  1. 1--Bearing wear. Having the front wheel of the bike elevated as such for 15K could very likely index the bearing races in the steering at the 12/6 o' clock positions. This is a well documented phenomenon in the bicycle industry. Also the turning is "unnatural" as the bike does not lean with the vehicle during turns, this also produces excess stresses. Also will wear all of your suspension components, bearings, pivots. 2--Towing the bike is pretty well thought to be a short term thing. Like getting the bike home from the dealer, or to the trail 30 miles away. Like maybe 1x per week. 3--I'd put money on something, at some point, failing...letting your bike loose on the road. Almost everyone I know has had/seen some kind of horror like this. And that is often with a much better (trailer or hitch) type carrying system. 4--It is just lame, and has a real loser-ish stigma about it....which is probably why most are saying to not do it. Which I recognize is not a great reason scientifically, but it is what it is~~ Lastly, I am jelly as hell! Wish I could join you on a trip this epic...we could even use my trailer!!
  2. Dont have anywhere to store even one of the folding trailers?? https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200612544_200612544
  3. Correct answer! Also---the hitch adapter reduces tongue weight load capacity by 50% as it adds length/leverage
  4. I agree with what (almost) everyone else here is saying. Don't tow your bike that way.
  5. Yes, yes you should. I am worried as well.
  6. So you gonna actually have that cut by a machine shop.....errrr, run a file across the top of it like 13 times? Not a flame or a joke, I'd really like to know
  7. My man...! I understand you and looked back over the OP I believe you are correct, good eye/call. BM1997---I'd heed this advice
  8. So true brother, thanks. I'll have no trouble getting the jetting where it needs to be, and will stay on the '18 S4 nj. The JDK030 will remain available to anyone interested, pm me. Do you know Kels personally? Seems like everyone here really respects and gets along well with him. My experience with him was not helpful, or unhelpful...kind of felt like a know-nothing loser who was wasting his time. He did tell me that he does not personally have a 150 or any access to one to really know a lot about this model....
  9. Uh...yeah ^^^^^^ this I would take as gospel. Well done!
  10. Thank you for this advice. IDK though...I got my jetting pretty nice already with the S4, and own all the accompanying jets in the +/- 2 sizes range.... Kind of don't feel like giving up all that stuff. Probably just as easy for me to sell the '17 JD kit for a slight loss. But as a curiosity-- Are the JD needles truly some kind of holy grail for this bike, or are you guys getting just as good using the OEM KTM spec Mikuni needle combos? (Also, bike has RK Tek insert recently installed, and carb is at RB designs getting the "works" mod package...so I will be jetting again soon.)
  11. I also had to buy one of those for my '18. Cold morning, did not turn fuel valve OFF while trailering, too much button pushing= melted brushes to rotor. Now for me 1st start of the day is done with the kicker only. Subsequent starts on the magic button.
  12. I bought one of the very first '18 models imported last summer. I then bought a '17 JD Jetting kit for the bike before realizing that the needle jet had been changed between '17-->'18 Quickly figured out that the '18 did not run right at all on the '17 JD kit, and subsequently sorted the jetting on my own using OEM Mikuni/KTM stuff. Anyone interested in the JD kit JDK030 for their '17? It has about 5 minutes of run time on it....pretty well brand new. PM me?
  13. Not trying to flame here. I agree. To each his own. BUT...If the guards are affixed to the upper leg/lower part of the triple clamp--->and then the hose is affixed to the tab on the guard---> Then the hose will be forced down toward the hub, and possibly the spokes or rotor...no? Unless that piece that affixes the hose to the guard allows for sliding. Which I cannot seem to discriminate from your pics.
  14. The neoprene type "gaiters" also do a wonderful job of trapping dirt, moisture, and abrasives right up against the legs and seals of the fork...exactly where you want that stuff. U know, rather than just taking the 2 minutes every few rides to clean your seals...