MotoTribology

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About MotoTribology

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    Riding, spectating and lubricants.

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  1. Just FYI and anyone else looking at this: For this, comparing 40C viscosity is the better number to use to compare oils regarding injector compatibility.
  2. That is correct. The supply from the injection system would differ with the viscosity difference. It could provide insufficient volume of the 800 because of its higher viscosity.
  3. Yeah the mechanical shearing takes place in the transmission. Engines don't typically have any areas where there is enough force to break the bonds. Off-road riding is often harder on oil because of frequent acceleration and heat. Off-road is typically slower speeds, meaning less cooling/higher engine heat. Water cooling does certainly help, but off-road bikes usually stay hotter. On-road is usually pretty steady speeds outside of stop-and-go traffic, so you don't have constant deceleration and acceleration like you do riding off-road. Accelerating puts the most pressure on the gear teeth and therefore, shearing happens the most during that time.
  4. 2 hours of use shouldn't have contaminated it enough to be a problem for a few months of storage. Any engine oil should be able to neutralize anything harmful that might have formed in that short time.
  5. 0 comments

    Awesome bike. Bulletproof and perfect for my riding style (slow, boring, or over my head). It never quits and seems to relish in being abused. Low end is amazing and gets me out of trouble my skill can't otherwise accomplish.
    Awesome bike. Bulletproof and perfect for my riding style (slow, boring, or over my head). It never quits and seems to relish in being abused. Low end is amazing and gets me out of trouble my skill can't otherwise accomplish.
  6. 0 comments

    Good solid bike. It has rarely let me down and requires little maintenance to keep chugging along. A few minor repairs here and there have been all I've needed to do over the years.
    Good solid bike. It has rarely let me down and requires little maintenance to keep chugging along. A few minor repairs here and there have been all I've needed to do over the years.
  7. My own bikes are 4-strokes, so I use a mixture of Bel-Ray EXL and EXP depending on which bike its going in. My family members who have 2-strokes use the Bel-Ray Gear Saver 80W in the trans.
  8. ATF adheres to the automaker's specifications so they can be thinner than an SAE 30 engine oil depending on the OEM spec. They also designate frictional characteristics, which is why not all ATF is equal when it comes to wet clutch motorcycles. FYI, 7wt. is not a standard SAE viscosity. Going down from 30 you go to 20, 16, 12, and 8, but 12 and 8 haven't really been implemented yet.
  9. MA2 just has a higher friction coefficient than MA (higher friction is better for the clutch). There's no difference between MA and MA2 with regard to catalytic converter compatibility. Both MA and MA2 are fine in the engine and the transmission. An MA2 oil should reduce slippage compared to an MA oil.
  10. It depends. I find that the correct viscosity has a lot to do with riding style/particular tendencies when using the clutch (when it comes to racing at least). I have had customers and racers switch from both thicker to thinner and from thinner to thicker for the exact same reason and have gotten the exact same result form the switch. So it really just depends on how people use the clutch. If you just dump the clutch and rocket out of every turn, that's going to be different from continuously feathering the clutch and using as an alternative to the brakes and both can do better with different oils. In general, yes, a trans specific oil should hold up for a very long time. 16 to 20 hours should be a walk in the park for a well formulated product.
  11. ^Just quoting this to bring it back a bit. This thread has gone quite a ways in a short time. The A3/B4 designations can relate to low friction oils which are not desirable in wet clutches, but to be honest with you, I am not all that familiar with the ACEA specs to go much further than that. Everything I deal with is pretty much API, JASO, or NMMA related. Yes shearing down a full grade in 5 hours is......not great. It seems like a lot of time and money spent to have to change out oil that frequently to me. The other point of "well it's only 1 cSt below the limit" is sort of, kind of valid, because the limits are somewhat arbitrarily made. However, they are the best we've got to go by and some distinction needs to be made; so whether it is 1 cSt or 3 cSt below the limit, it is still sheared out of grade. I've said it before and I'll say it again, if a formulator knows the product will shear, they should design it at the top of the designated range to limit its change in viscosity grade. If it is designed low to begin with and is known to shear.......well that's just poor design.
  12. There are 5 "groups" of base oils cleverly named Group I, Group II, Group III, Group IV, and Group V. - Group I is the most basically refined mineral oil (aside from naphthenic oils) - Group II is a more highly refined mineral oil. - Group III is extremely refined mineral oil commonly referred to as "synthetic" because it's performance in many areas is comparable to Group IV oils. - Group IV is polyalphaolefin (PAO) synthetically derived oil. - Group V is a catchall for pretty much all the remaining types of oils and fluids including silicones, esters, biobased oils, naphthenics, etc. Engine oils can and often do use any of the 5 groups in their formulation. Typically only esters are used from the Group V category though.
  13. If you want to rely on UOAs to tell the story, its viscosity shears down a lot in a short amount of hours. If you want to go by anecdotes, its viscosity shears down a lot in a short amount of hours and causes clutch fade. Either way, it is a fine oil for a short amount of time. Change it often enough to negate any cost savings and you'll do just fine with it