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EEE299

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About EEE299

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    New Jersey

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  1. EEE299

    2002 Yamaha YZ 125 Build

    It's hard to tell from the picture. It could run ok for a short while, relative to not running. You're really just pushing off the inevitable and wasting money on a new piston though.
  2. EEE299

    YZ250X Tire experiences?

    In general softer compounds mean better traction/less longevity, but that's not the whole story. It almost entirely depends on what you're riding, how you ride, and how long you expect your tires to last. Then you add that some of us ride a huge variety of terrain any given week and it's almost impossible to always have the 'right' tires on. IMO the most important aspects are tread pattern, rubber compound, and what pressure/system your running them at. When comparing tread patterns you have to consider how hard the terrain is. Tightly spaced knobs will put more edges on the ground and not flex the knobs as much reducing tearing. They will however pack with mud easily. Highly spaced knobs will clear out tacky dirt/mud for softer conditions, but will be more prone to tearing on hard pack and rocks. The softer the rubber compound the better grip you get on solid surfaces like rock, hard pack, and roots. In loom/mud/soft conditions where the tire isn't against solid surfaces soft rubber doesn't help as much but knob shape does. Of course if you run any tire at 20 psi it will perform like garbage in tight single track. I don't run crazy low pressures w tubliss like some people, as it makes the bike handle unpredictably at speed. You do need to be reasonably low to give a tire a fair chance, without sacrificing handling/pinches. It all depends on your needs. Almost everything I ride is classified as soft terrain, until I hit a rock garden. I typically buy soft terrain tires (widely spaced knobs) or other tires that will perform in the difficult sections of the race as well as decently everywhere else. I run them with bibs for rock races. Soft terrain tires don't last long in rocks so I usually hope for 3-5 races on a tire and push them to the 5 race mark when racing out of my series. They never hook as good as the first race, which usually keeps me from buying the super expensive tires. Once they are shot for racing, I flip them to my practice wheels and run them bald. The other thing is I try not to spin when stuck in rocks. It doesn't help anyway so why roast a new tire. Not going to change tires so often? Better off with something slightly harder and knobs less spaced. A tire that stays in one piece will out perform one that shredded itself at the same amount of hours.
  3. EEE299

    YZ250X Tire experiences?

    For those of you who love the M59, the x20 front has been very good too. I'm thinking it won't wear like iron, like the M59, but it felt glued to the dirt/mud/rocks the one enduro I have on it. It was pouring rain and everything was so wet the mud was not super tacky, however I was very impressed. For those exact conditions it definitely out gripped the M59. It probably will not be as versatile though.
  4. EEE299

    YZ250X Tire experiences?

    Agreed, the front is pretty bad. I just think they make decent rears for people riding some rock and looking for predictability and decent wear. Of course if you get into thick tacky mud it packs bad, but I didn't think that would be a problem for the OP.
  5. EEE299

    YZ250X Tire experiences?

    I'm not too familiar with your terrain, but I would guess maxxis IT would be a good all around tire for you. In general I think intermediate tires (starcross medium, x30) would be good for your terrain. I liked the maxxis IT better than the x30 - although bridgestone has a bunch of rebates right now. I wouldn't suggest shinkos if you're doing faster less technical terrain.
  6. EEE299

    2002 Yamaha YZ 125 Build

    You're going to need to replace your fork seals and fork oil. There's tons of instructional videos on youtube, find a good one and follow it.
  7. EEE299

    2018 Yamaha YZ250

    I would not hesitate to use it anyway tbh! It's good oil it just might spooge and make more of a mess than other oils.
  8. EEE299

    GPX TSE250R two stroke thread

    How has reliability been? Sounds like you can get parts, that would be one of my concerns. Are they fairly competitive?
  9. Plug it yourself and see if it holds. It might not, but their policy definitely errors on the safe side.
  10. EEE299

    2018 Yamaha YZ250

    Yes, I find some of the full synthetics burn cleaner and spooge less than the semi-synthetics like 2R (despite the listed flash point)
  11. EEE299

    2018 Yamaha YZ250

    Oil Specs Sheet
  12. EEE299

    2018 Yamaha YZ250

    H1-R is a relatively high flash point oil not low. H1-R: 435F 2R: 255F You're better off with something else for trail riding.
  13. EEE299

    new owner of 2005 yz125. got a few questions

    Ohhhh. Thanks, I never caught that before now. I just assumed if they changed one bike they would have done both.
  14. EEE299

    new owner of 2005 yz125. got a few questions

    I thought 07 and up came with the updated part? What do you mean you caught your 11-250 before it exploded?
  15. Yes, power valve governor. There's a few threads on it and which washer to remove. It tames the mid-hit and provides more smooth linear power. It's good for really technical slick terrain. I wouldn't suggest it for wide open riding.
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