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krglorioso

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About krglorioso

  • Rank
    TT Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Texas
  • Interests
    Motorcycle day trips on my 2016 DR-650, fishing, shooting. reading history of WWII.

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  1. Seat Concepts "Commuter" seat kit and Scottoiler. Tied for 1st place. Ralph
  2. krglorioso

    Help with new tires for drz400s

    I ride my DR-650 solely on the street (heresy!) and have fitted a Bridgestone at the rear and a Metzeler at the front, using the OEM wheels. 65 mpg consistently (engine/exhaust standard OEM) and recommend you begin with the OEM wheels and street tires of your choice. When you have worn out the new street tires, you can ponder the idea of converting to SuMo wheels. Try before you buy. Ralph
  3. krglorioso

    can anyone help[ identify this bike?

    It's good all around that you took the time to check. Happy outcome!
  4. krglorioso

    Clipped a TREE

    Exactly why this 82 year old rider remains on the roads. I envy you off road riders, but that's more of a risk than I need at my age. Been there; done that. Ralph
  5. krglorioso

    Clipped a TREE

    In 1958 I was a Marine lieutenant. Rode a British Velocette MSS "Scrambles" model and took it all the way to the Japanese island of Okinawa in 1960, shipped in a crate (courtesy of American Jawa in Los Angeles) and labeled "Officer's Household Goods". Sold it in Okinawa to a US Air Force sergeant and ordered a new Velocette "Clubmans" 500cc road racer built to order (Veloce, Ltd. was a very small company and would do such things) and they shipped it to me on Okinawa. Brought the bike home to NY with me in June 1961. Used it in pro racing until 1964 and then switched to a new Triumph with substantial Triumph Corp and dealer support. Rode the Triumph on flat track and road racing (two rear frame sections, two sets each of wheels, bars, exhausts, controls, tanks--fuel and oil--and seats) until repeated injuries ended my racing in 1968. My active Marine service extended from 1958 to 1961, so I heard no shots fired in anger. "You don't stop riding motorcycles because you got old...You got old because you stopped riding motorcycles". Ralph
  6. krglorioso

    Clipped a TREE

    Funny to hear you young kids referring to being old. Sheesh!!! Ralph (d.o.b.; 12/12/1936)
  7. krglorioso

    can anyone help[ identify this bike?

    sbest: Total agreement. Ralph
  8. krglorioso

    can anyone help[ identify this bike?

    What Chadzu said.
  9. krglorioso

    Broken leg with rod

    This has become a very interesting, very informative thread. Riding motorcycles in general can bring one into contact with various orthopedic repair techniques (!) and riding off road greatly increases the odds of limb fractures happening. Protective gear helps to a large degree, but there is no guarantee against fractures. I think we TT members are a lot wiser as a result of this thread. Ralph
  10. krglorioso

    Broken leg with rod

    I have no medical/surgical experience but in looking at the rod, I do not see a direct way of removing it. Mine had a hole at the very top, where it sat just below the hip socket, and the surgeon made a small incision in my hip area and inserted a tool with a hook into the hole and just drew it out (while I was quite asleep). I see a hole or two at the upper end of your rod, but only the surgeon knows if there's a clear path to draw out the rod if that should be desired. You might post again whenever you have spoken to a surgeon.
  11. krglorioso

    Broken leg with rod

    Oh, that answers several questions. Still, a consult with a sports ortho surgeon might give you some current knowledge about your 20+ year old repair at the cost of an office visit. You did say it's causes pain at times. Ralph
  12. krglorioso

    Broken leg with rod

    Is your rod still in place because it's not been in long enough or is this to be a permanent placement? If the latter, I would take the advice above recommending a consult with a sports orthopedic surgeon to see if the rod can eventually be removed. Ralph
  13. krglorioso

    Broken leg with rod

    What you have in your tibia is an intramedullary rod, originally called a "Kuntscher nail" after a WWII era German scientist who developed the technique to enable all members of the German army with long bone fractures to return to service quickly. As a result of a pro flat track racing accident in 1965, I had one in my left femur for a year. The rod was made of stainless steel with chromium and nickel added. It is 19.5" long and I still have it in a desk drawer. When I was discharged from hospital, the surgeon said, "Don't race again until it has been removed. If you re-break it with the rod inside, don't come back to me". It is a headache to repair a broken leg with an internal rod in it. A year or two later, the late Gary Nixon, the 2-time US Grand National Champion racer, broke his femur at the flat track mile national at Santa Rosa, CA. A few months later, Gary and his friend went woods riding, just to have a bit of harmless fun. Gary, being a racer, got a bit more aggressive on his Triumph Tiger Cub 200 and managed to re-break the femur with the rod within. The surgeon sawed through the rod at the point where it was bent and withdrew the halves from the upper and lower sections of the femur. Gary was out for a year. Gary and I were both in our 20s at the time of our injuries and healed well. Not so likely as we age... Please take great care with your fractured leg. It should get back to 100%. Once the rod is out, feel free to do whatever. Ralph ps: After my rod was out in 1966, I resumed pro racing and in 1968 re-broke the same leg in 7 places at a flat track event in Lanham, MD. I never raced again, but rolled up over 300 miles this past week on my DR-650.
  14. krglorioso

    Japanese Dual sport 450s?

    But the Van Van still is only a 200cc 2 valve single. Not going anywhere. Ralph
  15. krglorioso

    Japanese Dual sport 450s?

    Ah, yes, the evergreen DR-200. I am about to go for a ride on my 3 owner 2000 model. See if can raise its mileage above 1800. Only 60 degrees here in rural Texas, but I'll manage, somehow. Who said that transplanted Californians cannot be tough?? I also have a 2016 DR-650 with 7K miles, all by myself, and I wish there were a good engine-size enduro (what we called them before the marketeers decided on "dual-sport') with the weight of the DR-200. I just am not about to pay toward $11K OTD for a CRF-450L. Ralph
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