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xmxvet

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  1. I recently did a trip to Tennessee and Georgia and got to further test my new Doubletake mirrors on pavement, forest service roads and a very small amount of single track. The mirrors performed admirably. However, the real test was before I even started on my trip. The night before my departure from home, I loaded my bike in the back of my Honda Ridgeline. I wanted to have everything loaded and ready to go. I also did not want to leave my truck or XR650L outside. I proceeded to slowly pull into my garage and then got this feeling that I better get out and double check the clearance between the garage door header and my mirrors. The mirrors had already made contact with the stucco header and pivoted down without damage to the mirrors or perches, with only some minor scratches on the mirror arms. I was mad at myself for doing such a boneheaded thing, but, it seems I do that type of thing much more often with my chronic sleep deficit. A short side story.....I had a friend in the military that drove his Ford Explorer into his garage with his mountain bike on the roof rack. Now that was a bummer!
  2. xmxvet

    Honda XR650L 2013

    New addition to my garage! I just got the #IMS Products 4.0 Gallon Gas Tank installed & love it! The link below is to my review of the IMS 4.0 Gallon Tank: https://thumpertalk.com/reviews/product/9429-ims-large-capacity-gas-tank/?sort=newest&tab=reviews#review-21048
  3. xmxvet

    Honda XR650L (2013)

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    New addition to my garage! I just got the #IMS Products 4.0 Gallon Gas Tank installed & love it! The link below is to my review of the IMS 4.0 Gallon Tank: https://thumpertalk.com/reviews/product/9429-ims-large-capacity-gas-tank/?sort=newest&tab=reviews#review-21048
  4. xmxvet

    IMS Large Capacity Gas Tank

    IMS Products 4.0 Gallon Tank for Honda XR650L I recently acquired a 2013 Honda XR650L. I love the old school thumper, but it has a very short range of about 100 miles when riding with the throttle set to "FUN". I considered all the aftermarket gas tank options and decided that a 4 gallon tank would be the perfect size for my application. I wanted to increase the range to at least 140 miles, yet keep the bike as lean and svelte as possible; swelte for a BRP at least! Additionally, I wanted to get rid of the wings on the OEM tank and I prefer the look of the smaller tanks. I don't need a huge tank, as I can't stay on any motorcycle more than an hour or so without stopping to stretch and take a break, and a 4 gallon capacity provides a sufficient reserve. Installation of the IMS tank was a breeze, with no fitment issues. I have read comments by posters online, that they had to modify the L-Brackets to make the tank fit. I can't say for sure, but I suspect that perhaps the instructions weren't followed to the T. The instructions state what I learned over forty years ago when working at a Honda dealership assembling new bikes. When installing a component with multiple attachment points, simply get all of the bolts or screws started loosely. Only after all the hardware is installed loosely do you start to tighten everything down. This is especially true for something that is flexible and can expand and contract like a plastic gas tank. Additionally, I applied tire mounting lube to the rubber gas tank pucks, so they would slide easily through the tank channels during installation. The #IMS tank comes with all the hardware necessary for installation and a tank cap. It utilizes the OEM petcock and OEM rubber grommet/cushion and recessed washer at the back of the tank. The only thing that it does not include is vent hose for the tank cap. It would make installation more convenient if that were included. The tank is OEM quality, fits perfectly and allows plenty of clearance between the petcock and the engine cylinder. Also, the gas cap seals well. In my normal brain fog from lack of sleep, I forgot to weigh the OEM and IMS tanks for comparison. I do however recall a detailed listing on ThumperTalk of XR650L parts weights that indicated the stock tank with shrouds weighs about nine pounds. I estimate the IMS tank weighs about five pounds for a savings of about four pounds. I am very happy with the IMS 4.0 Gallon Fuel Tank. Great quality and a perfect fit. I remember IMS Products hitting the market back in 1976 with their high quality pegs, tanks and shift levers. I'm a big fan of their stuff. I also have their IMS Pro-Series Footpegs on my bike. I included photos of those at the very end of this review. The IMS tank does not add much width that would make it feel awkward, even with my 34 inch leg inseam. It is still very easy to slide forward on the bike. Plenty of clearance between engine and petcock. The size and shape of the tank essentially acts like the OEM cooling wings. I like the new look of the BRP....(now BWP)! Pros: OEM Fit and Quality. The tank has clean molding, without any extraneous molding marks. The color is a pure white that compliments the XR650L nicely. Easy Installation. Appears very durable, like an OEM plastic tank on a MX bike. I like the looks a lot! Does not affect movement on the bike, or affect handling. Most of the additional capacity is low on the bike. Increases capacity from 2.8 to 4.0 gallons. An approximate 143 mile total, or 43 mile increase in range for aggressive riding, & 170 mile total, or 70 mile increase in range for moderate riding. Note: I will confirm the range estimates after more time with the tank, and then update this review. Cons: Tank vent hose not included. Not a big deal or cost, but it would be more convenient if it were included. Verdict: A must have in my book! 👍👍👍👍👍 I also have the IMS Pro-Series Footpegs on the bike. High quality and work great!
  5. xmxvet

    Doubletake Mirror Enduro Mirrors

    I have recently acquired a 2013 Honda XR650L, which is my project bike. I am "making it my own" with some carefully selected upgrades. One of my favorite upgrades are the Doubletake Enduro Mirrors. The Doubletake mirrors are an essential upgrade for any bike that is used off-road, especially if the riding is around trees, brush, or any other obstacles that make contact with the bike on a ride. Or, essential for any bike that may make contact with the ground. The key features & benefits of the mirrors are: Easily fold out of harm's way for trail riding. Even though they are easy to adjust, once adjusted, they stay put. In the event of a crash, or contact with another bike or a tree etc., they will pivot without breaking either the clutch or brake perch. Additionally, the rider is not exposed to a sharp steel rod from a snapped off OEM mirror stalk. They feature very high quality SAE spec glass that gives a crystal clear view. The glass is slightly convex to provide a wide field of view. I have found that the rear view images are sharper than that of my OEM mirrors. They appear to be virtually indestructible, and are made out of a very tough nylon. The ball mounts and arms are Ram Mount brand components that are also of very high quality. The Ram Mount double-socket arm is metal, so it is tough as well. However, in the event of breakage, all of the individual components are replaceable. The total weight of the mirror assemblies are about the same as the OEM mirrors. MSRP is a very reasonable $96. These are the last mirrors you will ever need to buy. I have not noticed any vibration to speak of while riding, other than what the OEM mirrors exhibit. The XR650l is a "thumper", so it does vibrate more than a multi-cylinder bike, so that is just the nature of the beast. I have learned to instinctively momentarily back off of the throttle for a second to get a crystal clear view behind me if needed. Again, that is not any different than with the OEM mirrors. Thus, given the better optical quality of these, I get a better view than with the OEM mirrors. Before I had my new mirrors, I rode with my swift riding partner, Flyin Bryan aka @Bryan Bosch. He has the Doubletake Adventure mirrors on his KTM 690 Enduro R. On a spirited ride, we had a little collision, and my bike and especially my body, made contact with his bike. His Doubletake mirror pivoted without any damage to it, the front brake perch or me! It functioned perfectly! In addition, I recently did a trip to Tennessee and Georgia and got to further test these mirrors on pavement, forest service roads and a very small amount of single track. The mirrors performed admirably. However, the real test was before I even started on my trip. The night before my departure from home, I loaded my bike in the back of my Honda Ridgeline. I wanted to have everything loaded and ready to go. I also did not want to leave my truck or XR650L outside. I proceeded to slowly pull into my garage and then got this feeling that I better get out and double check the clearance between the garage door header and my mirrors. The mirrors had already made contact with the stucco header and pivoted down without damage to the mirrors or perches, with only some minor scratches on the mirror arms. I was mad at myself for doing such a boneheaded thing, but, it seems I do that type of thing much more often with my chronic sleep deficit. A short side story.....I had a friend in the military that drove his Ford Explorer into his garage with his mountain bike on the roof rack. Now that was a bummer! Mirrors folded out of harm's way and ready for the trail! The only thing I would change about the mirrors is the Ball Stud Base, that screws into the brake or clutch perch. The post is round, without flat sides to get a wrench on. It is not a big deal, as I hand tightened and used Loctite. I then tightened the double socket arm onto the ball to get more leverage, and used it as a "wrench" and then snugged it down some more. I may file flat sides on the posts if the need to tighten more arises. However, I suppose that the post does not have flat sides due to its small, low profile design. If I had a third hand to hold my camera, I would have given the mirrors TWO THUMBS UP! In summary: Virtually Indestructible Saves the brake and clutch perches, and your body, in a crash. Light Weight Lifetime Warranty on Mirror Body (glass can be purchased separately). Made in Colorado Springs by a rider. Look Cool I LOVE THESE MIRRORS! 👍 Note: The mirrors are also featured in my project bike blog which can be see here:
  6. xmxvet

    USWE Hydration Packs: The Brand You've Used, but Don't Know

    I totally concur with Bryan Bosch's thoughts on the USWE Ranger 9. I have been using hydration packs since 2003, and I have never found one I like as much as the USWE.
  7. xmxvet

    USWE Hydration Packs: The Brand You've Used, but Don't Know

    I haven't noticed any unpleasant taste from the bladder.
  8. xmxvet

    USWE Hydration Packs: The Brand You've Used, but Don't Know

    The "NO DANCING MONKEY" is for real, and the pack goes on and off quickly and easily. It is also very comfortable. All the features of the pack and bladder are well thought out. I love this hydration pack. It is my favorite by far.
  9. xmxvet

    Sold CRF450X and got XR650L- need advice

    I also have a new (to me) 2013 XR650L. I wanted it for the same reasons as you. I also have a KX450F and don't expect it to run like that, nor do I care. I have a Pro Circuit T4s slip on with stock header, snorkel removed, UniFilter, AIS removed (smog pump) with 160 Main & 58s pilot. I am going to create access to and adjust the mixture screw soon. It seems to be a little rich, but I live in Florida near sea level. I may just leave the current jetting in, as it will be cooling off and getting much less humid now. The atmospheric changes may make the jetting ideal. Next summer, I will likely try going down to a 158 main, 55s pilot. I do have a slight hiccup right off idle when sitting in the garage and blip the throttle. But I don't notice it when riding it. I found that when I did the AIS removal, it completely eliminated the decel pop, so I am surprised that you have that issue. But, like another poster said, you may want to thoroughly clean the carb and jets, then see where you are at after that. I am doing a running blog on my BRP project. I am posting all my mods there. You can see them here:
  10. My new old 2013 XR650L! Like many others, I too can tend to get caught up in the endless race to have the latest and greatest techno gadget, bike, firearm or whatever. But, many years and dollars later, I have realized that the race is futile and the satisfaction of obtaining the object of our desire is ephemeral. The new wears off quick, but the payments seem to go on forever! It was not that long ago, that I would have scoffed at the idea of not having modern inverted, fully adjustable cartridge forks, fuel injection, at least 50 HP and feather light weight on a motorcycle that goes off-road. Also, I have pursued the elusive unicorn of a bike that can “do it all”. It does not exist. No bike can do everything well; so, unless you have the means to have a bike for every mission, you will be riding a bike that is a conglomeration of compromises. The loved but gone KLR650 My last, and recently sold, old tech bike was my 2013 KLR650. I took a lot of time to tweak it to my satisfaction, and I really hated to sell it. But, for most of the dual sport riding that I do locally, I am in deep sand, mud, occasional whoops, brush and tight spaces. The big girl weighed about 445 lbs. (as I had built her), and she just wasn’t built for that mission. So, I had to say goodbye. But, she found a new home with Barry, who purchased her to do the Trans America Trail. That is what I built her for! I pondered many replacement choices, such as the modern KTM 690 Enduro R and Husqvarna 701 Enduro, as well as the KTM 500EXC and the new 2019 Honda CRF450L. I also thought hard about the old school Suzuki DR650S and DRZ400. I considered older KTM and Husqvarna big bore thumpers too. All of them could have worked for me, with each having its own strengths and weaknesses. In the end, I decided to go old school and purchase a used bike to keep cost down. I also wanted to have a simple bike, that is easy to work on. I liked the idea of screw & locknut verses shim over bucket or shim under bucket valves. The ability to do a valve adjustment with just a wrench and screwdriver, in under 30 minutes, was very appealing to me. I also liked the idea of an air-cooled engine. I certainly know that these features don’t allow for the most precise tolerances and high performance, but that was not what this bike was to be about for me. I have other modern bikes that fill that niche. Also, OEM and aftermarket parts availability were a primary concern. Other requirements were long travel suspension that could be made to work well off-road, a high ground clearance, 350 lbs. max weight, a torque rich motor and the ability to carry moderately loaded soft luggage for long trips. I required a bike that handles single track reasonably well, but also can comfortably run at 70 mph all day and be reasonably comfortable for 300 miles of pavement on out of state dual-sport rides. My local dual-sport rides are typically about 90 miles of pavement (round trip) and 20-30 miles of trails. Lastly, one of the non-quantifiable and intangible requirements for this bike was to take me back to a simpler time, to my early teens. A time when I was in the garage tinkering with my 1973 Honda CT70H, or my Bultaco Pursang 175, while listening to Led Zeppelin or Heart. It was a time when the only news I got was delivered by Walter Cronkite and the only correspondence was via the US Mail. I would happily surrender my Android, computer, internet and 60” flat screen to go back to a time when people actually talked to each other. A time that we only had 3 TV channels to watch, but somehow it was more than enough. I ultimately bought a 2013 Honda XR650L. It fit the above requirements better than anything else I could come up with. As a bonus, red is my favorite color! Maiden voyage of the BRP. With @Bryan Bosch at the Historic Richloam Gen Store (Est. 1921) Bryan Bosch standing next to the orange rocket and the BRP. This was the BRP's maiden voyage to Richloam. This photo is in front of the historic Richloam General Store. If you like to see cool, old things, go check this place out. One of the interesting things on display is an old 1902? Sears Roebuck catalog. In it, you can see listings for items such as a Marlin lever action rifle for $12.00. This ride is the typical mission that I wanted the BRP for. I am not in a hurry or trying to set the world's fastest pace. I want to slow down and travel back to a simpler time! Today was a double bonus for me, as I got to ride my BRP for the first time, and I got to try out my new USWE Ranger 9 Hydration Pack. I love the pack for its innovative features and comfort. The biggest plus for the USWE is that it does not shift and bounce around on your back. See the @Bryan Bosch full review of it which will be forthcoming. USWE Ranger 9 "No Dancing Monkey" My new (to me) BRP is my current project. I am building it with the following objectives: Improve suspension performance to accommodate my weight (200lbs.) and riding style (aggressive). Improve engine performance without sacrificing reliability or the ability to run on regular, low octane gas. Reduce weight. Increase fuel range. Tailor ergonomics for me (6’2”, 34-inch inseam). Streamline and de-clutter unnecessary hardware. Reinforce rear subframe to handle heavier cargo loads. Upgrade lighting to high output LED’s. Upgrade handguards to something more trail-worthy than the OEM guards. Install Garmin Amps Rugged Mount with connection to battery. Install battery tender lead that also powers my Antigravity Batteries Micro-Start Mini Tire Inflator Replace OEM mirrors with mirrors that swing out of the way (without tools) for trail use. Over twenty years ago, shortly after getting out of the military, I had an XR600R that I used for trail riding and hare scrambles. I raced it at a couple of MX races (for fun) even though I also had a YZ250 at the time. Thus, I had a general idea of what I would be getting into with the XR650L. This photo of me on my XR600R was taken at the Reddick Hare Scrambles in 1996. Man, that Supertrapp was LOUD! It did make passing a little easier, because the noise usually scared the rider in front out of the way. I loved that bike (once I got it started). @xmxvet racing a BRP You meet the nicest people (or puppies) on a dual-sport! @Bryan Bosch with a sweet little dog that was either lost or abandoned deep in Richloam. She was hot and dehydrated. Bryan skillfully carried her on his KTM 690 Enduro R back to civilization where we were able to find a nice family to take her in. BRP mods have commenced! The first thing I am doing to the XR650L is to reduce weight by removing unnecessary parts and clutter. The first two pounds were simple. I removed the passenger foot pegs. The next item to go was the AIS (Air Injection System) or Smog Pump. This not only removes two pounds, but also cleans up the clutter on left side of the motor and gets rid of the lean deceleration pop. Some have reported that it can slightly improve throttle response as well. I haven't had a chance to evaluate the performance aspect yet. Removal of the AIS requires the use of an inexpensive smog block off kit. Here's a before and after photo: Before After On the scale. 2 pounds gone! Next, I removed the seat strap which was unnecessary for my purposes and uncomfortable. I also removed the front reflectors. This bike will rarely be ridden at night. Today, I installed a set of Renthal 971-08 7/8" handlebars. These are the OEM bars on my 2017 KX450F. I like the bend of the bars a lot. Additionally, I prefer 7/8" bars over 1 1/8" bars for the slightly softer (more flex) feel. I have arthritis in all of my joints, and hard impacts like roots, square edged braking bumps or slap down landings off of jumps can take a toll on my wrists. Fat bars feel harsher to me. An additional benefit is the crossbar which I like because it is a place to mount my Giant Loop handlebar bag. I have also found that the crossbar is a very convenient and comfortable place to rest my hand while making inputs into my Garmin Montana 680T. The Renthal 971-08 bars are about 7 oz. lighter than the OEM bars, and have a lot less sweep. The sweep on the OEM bars felt like it placed my hands in my lap, and my wrists were bent at an uncomfortable angle. The 971's are a huge improvement over the OEM bars! OEM bars Renthal 971-08 Renthal 971-08 (top) vs OEM (bottom). The 971-08's have much less sweep, but have about the same rise. Even though I am tall, I prefer lower bars, as I feel more connected to the front of the bike with lower bars. Tall bars make a bike's steering feel sort of vague to me, instead of precise. Plus, the "attack" position feels more natural with lower bars, as it naturally pulls you more over the front wheel of the bike. I got to try out these handlebars last weekend and they are a huge improvement over the stock bars. I had a minor "duel-sport" collision with @bryan bosch on his KTM 690 Enduro R. This leads me to my next mod which is my Doubletake "Enduro" Mirrors. Bryan has the Doubletake "Adventure" mirrors on his 690. In the collision, his right mirror pivoted around and was completely unscathed, performing as designed! The mirror design not only prevents the mirror itself from getting damaged, but also protects the front brake and clutch perches from breaking. Here's some pics of the mirrors I just installed: Retracted for trail riding I love the mirrors! The optical clarity seems even better than the OEM Honda mirrors, as the rear view images seem sharper. And, they do not add any weight to the bike. This is a quote from their website: "We will warranty the mirror body for the life of the product, but for obvious reasons cannot extend the same protection to the glass insert. We do sell the glass separately if you manage to break it. We also have a satisfaction guarantee—if you receive your mirror and aren't happy with it for any reason, you can return it for a refund." All of the components are replaceable, and use Ram Mounts, which are also of very high quality. The mirrors are made in the USA! FIVE BIG STARS! Next on the list of upgrades was an IMS 4.0 Gallon Fuel Tank. But. before installing that, I figured it was a good time to remove the airbox snorkel and the welch plug that Honda installs to block access to the fuel mixture screw. The latter mod I had to do to my KLR650 as well. For the airbox snorkel, I used a cable tie and masking tape to hold the wiring harness out of the way of the 3/64" bit used to drill out the rivets. Snorkel removed Note: It is not necessary to drill all the way through the rivet. As the pictures show, you only need to drill far enough for the head of the rivet to pop off. I left the body of the rivets in to plug the holes. Next up was the carburetor fuel mixture screw access. It is blocked from the factory by a brass welch plug. I used a 3/32" bit to drill a hole through the plug, taking my time to drill slowly and just barely break through the plug. I then screwed a wood screw into the brass plug, and then used pliers to grab the screw and pull the welch plug out. Now that I had access to the D-shaped mixture screw, I found that my Motion-Pro D-shaped bit was too short to reach the screw when attached to my driver. So, I used a Dremel with a cutting wheel to cut off only about 3mm of the housing to allow my bit to snap firmly onto the mixture screw. I used a file to chamfer the sharp edges left by the cutting wheel. Now that I could adjust the mixture, I determined that it was set at about 1 1/4 turns (counter-clockwise) out, which is too lean. I set it at 2 1/8 turns out. Another point worth mentioning is the jetting. My bike came from the previous owner with the Pro Circuit T4s installed. However, he did not change the OEM jetting, so the bike ran very lean. Before my first ride, I swapped the OEM 152 main and 50 pilot for a 160 main and 58 pilot. That was much better, but slightly rich for our hot, humid summers. I am leaving the jetting as is though, because cooler, drier weather is finally arriving! Next summer, I will try a 158 main and 55 pilot. With all of the carb work finished, I could put the carb back on the bike and start on the IMS Fuel Tank installation. Installation of the IMS tank was a breeze, with no fitment issues. I have read comments by posters online, that they had to modify the L-Brackets to make the tank fit. I can't say for sure, but I suspect that perhaps the instructions weren't followed to the T. The instructions state what I learned over forty years ago when working at a Honda dealership assembling new bikes. When installing a component with multiple attachment points, simply get all the bolts or screws started loosely. Only after all the hardware is installed do you start to tighten everything down. The tank is OEM quality, fits perfectly and allows plenty of clearance between the petcock and the engine cylinder. In my normal brain fog from lack of sleep, I forgot to weigh the OEM and IMS tanks for comparison. I do however recall a detailed listing of XR650L parts weights that indicated the stock tank with shrouds weighs about nine pounds. I estimate the IMS tank weighs about five pounds for a savings of about four pounds. I like the new look of the BRP. I may have to change that to BWP! I am very happy with the IMS 4.0 Gallon Fuel Tank. Great quality and a perfect fit. I remember IMS Products hitting the market back in 1976 with their high quality pegs, tanks and shift levers. I'm a big fan of their stuff. I also have their IMS Pro-Series Footpegs on my bike. More to come.........................
    I have had the Antigravity Micro-Start Sport Personal Power Supply since May 25, 2018. I have been wanting to post a review of it, but have been waiting to get some real world experience with it before sharing my thoughts. Bryan's review above, is thorough as usual, so I can't think of much to add, that he hasn't already covered in great detail with regard to features and specifications. My experience with real world use came today, and is worth mentioning. As noted above, I got the unit over two months ago, and promptly topped off the charge and stored it away in its nice little case. Well, this morning, my wife was ready to head off to work, but found that her Honda Accord, with a 2.4 Liter, 4 cyclinder engine had a dead battery. 😠 So, rather than push her car out of the garage and pull my truck over to her car to start it with jumper cables, I thought that the Personal Power Supply could possibly make the jump start easier, if it still had a charge remaining. I retrieved the unit from its case and depressed the power button; I was happy to see all four green LED's illuminated that indicated a full charge! The LED's indicate the following state of charge: 1 light=25%, 2 lights=50%, 3 lights=75%, 4 lights=%100. I then connected the Mini Jumper Cables (included) to the capacitor units Jump Start Port. The Clamps Panel flashed alternating Green and Red LED's once connected to indicate all is normal. I then connected the Mini Jumper Cables to the car battery terminals and the Clamps Panel LED's both changed to steady Green to indicate the connection to the car battery was correct, and it was ready to start. If the connection is incorrect, such as a reverse polarity, the Clamps LED's will flash Red and emit a Buzz sound. I told my wife to attempt a start, and her Accord turned over and started right up!☺️ In conclusion, this Personal Power Supply even made the task of jump starting a car much less of a hassle than using another jump vehicle, even though I was at home with another vehicle and jumper cables readily available. The fact that it is so small and light, and can start a car is remarkable. I will always have this either in my wife's car, my truck or on my motorcycle! 👍
    I have used cam buckle tie downs for many years. The well-known brand I have used for the past few decades has served me well. However, I have found a new favorite in the Rhino USA Ultimate Tie Down Straps. There are several features that stand out. The S-Hooks have a generous thickness of vinyl coating. The straps are wider and of a softer type of material than my old straps, and the cam buckles are very big in comparison to my others. Additionally, my favorite feature is the spring-loaded keeper clips, which are especially handy when loading a bike by yourself. The clips keep the S-Hooks from detaching from the truck/trailer attachment points or the loop end of the built-in soft loops, or if used, another set of separate soft loops, which Rhino USA makes as well. Another handy feature is the nice, perfectly sized storage bag. I am a bit of a neat freak and appreciate keeping things tidy and in their place! I dislike carrying loose tie downs with their S-Hooks sometimes swinging like little wrecking balls, attempting to wreak havoc on whatever shiny machines you may have within the radius of their arc. The American Flag that is sewn on the straps is also a nice touch. As the picture illustrates, the Rhino USA strap (right/black) is heavy duty and quite a bit burlier than my old strap (left/blue) which is shown for comparison. These tie downs look like they will last a lifetime, and they do come with a lifetime warranty. I applaud U.S. companies that provide quality products!
  11. 6 reviews

    MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN - Support an American Father/Son Business from Temecula, California! LAB TESTED 3,328LB BREAK STRENGTH COATED TITANIUM S-HOOKS - Full Bend S Hooks with Spring Loaded Keeper Clip For 100% Safety SECURE PEACE OF MIND - Knowing the Motorcycle, ATV, UTV you Love is Safe & Secure when Travelling CONVENIENT & EASY TO USE - Fits all Handlebars, Frames, Swing-Arms and Tight Spots Hooks Can't Go! GUARANTEED 5-STAR EXPERIENCE - If you aren't 100% Satisfied for any Reason We'll Refund Your Money
  12. xmxvet

    Rhino USA Soft Loops

    These Rhino USA Soft Loops are wider, stronger and softer than others that I have used before. They are also less abrasive feeling, which is a nice feature when used against cowlings, paint, and graphics like those on my KLR650. They come as a package of four straps, and are offered in several colors to match your bike. The neon green matches my 2017 KX450F perfectly! Made in the USA, and have a lifetime warranty! Who doesn't love that?
  13. xmxvet

    Rhino USA Digital & Analog Tire Pressure Gauges

    I totally concur with everything previously stated by Bryan, regarding the Rhino USA tire pressure gauges. The things that make these gauges stand out from the crowd are: Digital Gauge Ergonomic shape with a grippy coating. Lanyard attachment point on base of unit. Blue LED backlighting for digital readout. Blue LED light on nozzle to illuminate valve stem. 30 second automatic shutoff to prevent battery drain. Fluorescent green is easy to find in darkness. The fluorescent green color and the blue LED lighting make the gauge easier to find, and less likely to be left on a dark trail or side of the road. Analog Gauge Brass fittings. Swiveling nozzle. Braided, reinforced hose. Heavy duty shock absorbing rubber on gauge. Large phosphorescent needle and numbers that are surprisingly bright! The phosphorescent feature only requires a very brief (a couple of seconds) charge by illuminating with a headlight or flashlight to energize the needle and numbers. This photo was taken with a Samsung Galaxy S4 (old & antiquated- like me!). Due to its limitations, without using a flash, the digital display is blurry. To the human eye, it is very clear and easy to read in total darkness. These gauges are provided by a small, family owned domestic business and have a lifetime warranty!
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