Kevin from Wiseco

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About Kevin from Wiseco

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  1. A rod break in that location is definitely concerning. Would it be possible to have you send us the crank/rod for inspection?
  2. They beat me to it! Yes, that's essentially where the top of the top ring stops at TDC. Nothing too much to worry about. If you ever want to clean those up in the future, they actually sell an automotive tool called a Ridge Reamer: As for the magnet, I see the point with the Nikasil. Usually with a freshly plated cylinder, a magnet will make a very weak connection, not enough to hold it on. I guess that depends on the magnet you're using too Good luck this weekend!
  3. Well, your measurements seem okay as far as clearance goes. 1.) It has most likely been re-sleeved, which is still fine with the rings that come with the new piston. The only time our 2-stroke rings will cause issues is with the old chrome plating (late 70s, early 80s) 2.) The scar could affect compression slightly. That doesn't sound very deep, but I would do a compression test once it's together to see what kind it builds. Also, make sure the ring end gap isn't going to line up with that scar. That could cause issues. 3.) As for the seam, this is a little bit concerning, considering you can feel it. Is there a way to get a good photo of it?
  4. Jeremy Martin Leads the Charge for Wiseco Riders at Daytona Supercross Christian Craig Turns in Career Best in 450 Competition MENTOR, Ohio (March 13, 2018) – Jeremy Martin showed the way for Wiseco-sponsored riders in Saturday night’s Monster Energy Daytona Supercross presented by Honda. In a season marred by bad luck and misfortune, Martin put together a near flawless ride to earn his first Eastern Regional 250SX Class podium finish of the season. Martin qualified eighth for the division’s annual visit to the World Center of Racing, finished fourth in his heat race, and came home second in the 250SX main event, missing his first win of the year by less than a second. “It’s Daytona, a real man’s track.” said Martin who sits fourth in points. “It was the toughest race of the year as far as fitness. I had to slow down a little bit, halfway through the main. I was getting close to (race winner) Jordon (Smith) and I was starting to think about where I could make a move on him, then I made some mistakes and he got away from me. Couldn’t quite get close again, but it’s good. We’re on the podium and in contention for wins again. That’s something I haven’t been able to say in supercross in a while. We want to get wins and now we know it’s coming.” Martin’s podium was a bright spot, but the rest of the event was rough for the GEICO Honda/Factory Connection squad. RJ Hampshire crashed hard in his heat race and had to be transported to a local hospital. He injured his back and ribs, but shoulder pain left him with the most concern. “I felt good on the bike all day,” said Hampshire via his Instagram account. “Had some pretty good speed and my foot just slid off hitting my shifter in those rollers during that heat race. After seeing the pictures from the crash I’m very thankful I didn’t take a shot to my head. I have some fractures in my T3/T4 in my back and ribs. Also have some damage to my lungs which is why I’ll be spending a couple nights in the hospital. I’ll be getting some more checkups this week on the shoulder also.” Cameron McAdoo, the third member of the team, was unable to compete at Daytona after being sidelined with a hand injury two races ago in Atlanta. Across the paddock, in the premier 450SX Class, Christian Craig got the call to fill in for Team Honda HRC. With the team’s regular riders Ken Roczen and Cole Seely out with injuries, it was up to Craig to carry the load for the factory team, and the upstart rider didn’t disappoint. The San Diego native was solid in both qualifying sessions, won his heat race and snagged the holeshot in the division’s main event. After relinquishing the lead to eventual winner Justin Brayton, Craig continued to show he was up for the challenge. The 26-year-old rider raced for second and third for most of the 20-minute-plus-one-lap feature before losing one more spot in the late goings to bring his No. 32 Honda CRF450R home fourth in the final rundown. “I had a great week testing with the team,” commented Craig. “They came down to Florida right after Atlanta and I feel like we really improved. Just getting more time on the bike and getting more comfortable was huge. I started off race day feeling really good. My qualifying position didn’t really show it, but overall I was happy with my riding. It’s all about having fun out there, and man, that’s what I did tonight. I was up front in the heat race, fell to third, but then the two guys in front took each other out so I ended up winning. You can call it luck or whatever, but I just put myself in a good position to capitalize on people’s mistakes." “I had a good gate pick and some confidence going into the main. I grabbed the holeshot and led for almost the first lap, but [Justin] Brayton got by me pretty quick. I stayed second for quite a while. I just rode my hardest and did my best. Unfortunately, a couple guys got by me so I ended up fourth. The track was so tough. This is only my second time racing Daytona and last year didn’t go well, so I really wanted to get some revenge this year. It’s better than the week before, but man, I was so close to a podium. I just need to keep putting myself in good positions and work on getting better each weekend.” Monster Energy AMA Supercross rolls on this weekend when the series visits the “Gateway to the West” for its annual race at the Dome at America’s Center in St. Louis. The 11th of 17 races on the 2018 supercross calendar will be televised live on FS1 Saturday, March 17, beginning at 8 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, 5 p.m. Pacific. -30-
  5. I couldn't agree more. We're not perfect, of course, but there are so many factors that play a role in satisfactory engine performance, we want to do what we can to limit the amount of issues people experience outside our control. We appreciate your support and your business. Keep us updated with how everything comes out.
  6. No problem! We're glad to help. We're just as much enthusiasts, riders, and racers as everyone else, so we want to help where we can!
  7. Our main recommendation in the article for deglazing is a brush hone, which is much less dangerous than a ball hone. Ball hones should only be used when absolutely necessary, and they must be used with caution, as you noted. Personally, I think if someone needs a ball hone because the glazing is that bad, it'd be safer to have a professional shop refinish it. Scotchbrite and WD40 is definitely another option, it's just tougher to regulate degree of the cross hatch.
  8. When our piston kits are designed for a certain sized bore, in your case 54mm, they come in one size to achieve the recommended clearance, which for your bike I believe is .0020. That being said, there is still an acceptable range of clearance, and seeing your bore measurements and the fact that they could be off by .0005 to .001, I think you'll still fall within the acceptable range of clearance. Of course the most surefire way is to have the cylinder professionally refinished so you know the size is consistent, but we understand in many cases rebuilds are fine with a good deglazing and a new piston. We have a few options of piston for your bike, including our new Racer Elite, which has a skirt coating designed to conform to the bore size. But if you do decide to go with a ProX, the 53.97 would probably be the best choice.
  9. Please let us know if we can be of any help during the rebuild. Below are some tips we put together for cylinder prep for a top end rebuild. From reading through the contribution from the other users, they're correct about measuring the used piston. Because it's been ran been through x number of heat cycles, the measurement won't be accurate. We always recommend measuring the bore with a dial bore gauge, and ordering the piston for that size. As for the exhaust bridge, make sure the exhaust bridge is relieved, and the ports are chamfered in addition to the lubrication holes in your piston. Here's another article we put together with all the info on exhaust bridge work: Please let me know if you have any questions!
  10. Thank you for the comment. This is why we don't recommend using a ball hone unless absolutely necessary, in which case it still must be made sure that the grit and material of the ball hone is safe for the finish of the cylinder. A brush hone can reduce the glazing in common cases. Piston-to-wall clearance should always be checked as well before final assembly. Thank you!
  11. Absolutely. We provide finished size of all our pistons, which should be given to the machinist so the cylinder can be finished at the correct size allowing proper clearance.
  12. Freshening up the top end in your dirt bike or ATV is a critical part of preventative maintenance. However, it’s not as simple as purchasing a new piston kit and dropping it in. Properly preparing your cylinder is equally as important as installing a quality piston. Cylinder prep recommendations are always included with the piston when ordering from Wiseco. Depending on your application, it will either say “deglaze / hone” or “bore & hone” or “bore / replate.” We’ll take a look at exactly what these different terms mean and how to perform these steps. Deglaze your Cylinder A common question is “Do I need to deglaze my cylinder?” The answer is: yes, unless it’s time for a replate or resleeve. If you’re engine has any time on it, the glazing process has begun. The term ‘glazed’ in this context refers to the motion of the piston ring(s) flattening out and polishing the surface of the cylinder wall during normal operation. The more time on the engine, the more glazed the cylinder is going to be. However, depending on how much time is on your engine and what type of cylinder you have, you may need to replate or resleeve, which we’ll discuss next. Notice the shiny surface of the cylinder wall. This cylinder has become glazed over time. Plated vs. Sleeved Cylinders If your Powersports engine was made in the last 2 decades or so, chances are it is plated with a Nikasil (Nickel Silicone Carbide), chrome, or electrofusion plating. Nikasil has been the latest and most commonly used cylinder coating due to its wear resistance qualities, but they do still wear out. We recommend checking your manual for normal top end rebuild times, but generally if your engine has long hours, the overall condition of your cylinder will need to be closely reviewed. This will include not only the bore size and plating condition, but also the cylinder roundness and taper in reference to OEM service specifications. There are a number of good companies that offer replating services, just do your research and choose a trusted company. Your cylinder should come back with fresh plating, honed, and ready to go after a quick cleaning. This cylinder has been replated and prepped for the rebuild. The cylinder wall surface is no longer reflective and glazed-looking. Other forms of cylinders that aren’t plated commonly have iron or steel/alloy sleeves. If your cylinder does have a sleeve, you should be able to see the seam between the sleeve and the actual cylinder. If you’re still not sure, check to see if a magnet sticks to the cylinder wall. If it sticks, it’s a sleeve, and if it doesn’t, it’s plated. Much like replating a cylinder after normal top end rebuild time, your sleeved cylinder should have a new sleeve installed. The same cylinder shops that do replating should do resleeving as well, and it will come back honed and ready to go back together. In short, if your engine has enough time on it to need a full top end rebuild, we recommend replating or resleeving your cylinder. Technically you can have your previously plated cylinder sleeved, but we recommend sticking with how it came from the OEM. If it is just freshening up with low hours on the engine, you should be able to just deglaze / hone. What is Honing and Why do I Need It? When your engine was made brand new in the factory, the cylinder was honed. Honing is a process of conditioning the surface of the cylinder wall to help with lubrication of the piston ring(s) during operation. Honing creates fine cross hatch imperfections on the surface of the cylinder bore. You can think of these imperfections as peaks and valleys in the surface of the metal. These are essential because it helps the cylinder wall retain oil to assist with piston ring lubrication. Theoretically, the idea is for there to be a very thin layer of oil between the edge of the piston rings and cylinder wall. If there was no oil to lubricate the constant contact with the cylinder wall, there would be too much friction and both the rings and cylinder would wear out quickly. The term ‘deglazing’ simply refers to re-honing your cylinder to put those peaks and valleys back in your cylinder wall. This crosshatch pattern on the wall of the cylinder is the goal of the honing. How to Hone your Cylinder The most common tools you’ll find for honing small engine applications are rigid or brush hones and ball hones. Hones can be ordered by size according to your cylinder bore, just cross reference your bore size with the information from the company you order your hone from. The hone company should also have recommendations on grit and material type based on what type of rings you have. After disassembling your top end, inspect your cylinder wall and ports for damage. If you had a piston seizure or something break, chances are the cylinder was damaged. Depending on how extensive the damage is, sometimes cylinder shops can repair them. If you see any questionable damage or deep scuffs, we recommend sending your cylinder to a trusted shop for their best recommendation. If your cylinder is in normal condition with no damage, and you’re just changing rings between top ends, honing should be the only thing required. If the glazing is minimal and you can still see a fair amount of cross hatch marks, you should be able to get away with using a rigid or brush hone to just restore those cross hatch marks. You should only have to hone for about 10 – 15 seconds at a time until you can see consistent cross hatch marks. A soft hone brush like this is one of the tools that may be used to prepare the interior surface of the cylinder. The ball hone will be a little bit more abrasive, which is why we don’t recommend using a ball hone on plated cylinders unless they are specified to be safe. If you do need to use a ball hone for heavier glazing on your sleeved cylinder, attach it to your drill and lubricate it with a light coat of motor oil. Make sure the cylinder is secured and stationary, and the ball hone is spinning before entering the cylinder. Hone the cylinder back and forth for about 10 – 15 seconds, then switch to the opposite spinning direction and repeat. Check the cylinder for the desired cross hatch marks, and repeat if necessary. After honing is complete, be sure to clean the cylinder thoroughly until there is no residual material. When reassembling your top end, always be sure to double check your piston to wall clearance. Do I Need to Bore my Cylinder? If the instructions for your new piston say “bore & hone” or “bore / replate,” it’s because you ordered a piston that is larger than the stock bore size. Instructions to bore and hone your cylinder means your cylinder did not come plated from the OEM, and only requires to be machined out to the correct size for your piston. However, if it is a sleeved cylinder, consider having it resleeved depending on the time on the engine. Instructions to bore and replate your cylinder means your cylinder came plated from the OEM, so the only work required is to have the cylinder machined to the correct size for your piston, and then replated / honed. We recommend having your local trusted cylinder shop do your boring and replating work. In any case, we recommend having the cylinder bored by a professional machinist with the proper equipment. Cylinder shops that replate and resleeve usually have the capability to bore as well. Don’t Forget to Chamfer and Clean Up After any boring or honing work on a cylinder, it’s important to chamfer all ports and the bottom of the cylinder. Chamfering is smoothing out any sharp edge to leave a symmetrical sloping edge. Creating sloped edges on the bottom of the cylinder allows for easier piston and ring installation. You also want to make sure that the edges of the ports in the cylinder have a nice slope as well so the piston rings don’t get caught on any edges during engine operation. If your cylinder has an exhaust bridge, be sure it is relieved .002” - .004” to allow for expansion. Exhaust bridge relief is important in certain 2-stroke applications. Read more about exhaust bridge relief here. Lastly, be sure to properly clean any parts that have been worked on. Cylinders that have been bored and/or honed will have residual honing grit. This must be removed by washing with warm soapy water until an oil dampened cloth does not show any grit after wiping the surface of the cylinder wall. Once clean, apply a thin coat of oil on the cylinder wall before proceeding with your rebuild. Always be sure to cover all your bases when freshening up the top end in your machine. Giving the required attention to all areas will help you be sure you’re getting the smoothest performance and most reliability out of your engine.