Dexter643

Members
  • Content count

    834
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

61 Excellent

About Dexter643

  • Rank
    TT Silver Member

Contact Methods

Profile Information

  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    dirt bikes, off road
  1. This. Clicker adjustments are for suspension in motion. Sag is set at rest.
  2. Way to bring back a 4 year old thread. Check out the TT store, I just (last week) bought a bushing kit for my KTM and it was about $40 for the kit- both bushings for both fork legs. Yea, it was more than the $28 kit (same brand) I got for my brothers Yamaha, but whatever. @velosapiens, the seals I got/get are under $30 (2 dust seals, 2 oil seals)... have bought different brands (including OEM @ the stealership) of yamaha, ktm, and honda varieties. I think the synergy ones I got a couple years ago were ~$35 but I prefer the triple lip moose/msr seals to them, anyway. If you're paying $50, I'll sell you some for $40.:thumbsup: & for the general poll, I slide down the dust seal (leave the snap ring in place) and use a feeler gauge to clean if/when necessary. .008" IIRC.
  3. My advice then, when you get to that point, is to have a proper revalve done in conjunction with new springs. Having had a half dozen cookie-cutter revalve jobs done by 'reputable' companies, I'd strongly suggest you going with a local tuner (with a decent reputation) that's willing to do your revalve, and re-do it to your satisfaction @ a reasonable cost. Or take the time to research and learn & spend the $$ to do it yourself. If you have to send your suspension out, it's sort of a crap-shoot.
  4. Your sag #'s are fine. Ride the damn bike.:thumbsup: Empirically, you probably are too heavy for the stock springs (if that's what you've got). But realistically, you probably don't ride in a fashion to take full advantage of or to properly utilize heavier springs. i.e.- for the casual rider, softer springs will feel more comfortable. And I agree, Budweiser (& beer for that matter) does suck.
  5. The 'fork saver' spacer blocks' only real benefit is that they make the front end rigid, so that when you're hauling the bike and hit a pothole, the suspension won't compress and the tie down (momentarily gone slack) won't fall off. Crap getting in the seals &/or seals drying out is what makes fork seals leak. Sealsavers can help, but I've worn through a set in a single hare scramble (~3 hours). I don't think I've ever had fork seals long enough for them to dry out. For $25 a set, I just change them a few times a year when they start to weep (usually it's past due for a fluid change as well.)
  6. I came across this flowchart a few years ago. It's from a street bike point of view but most of the premises cross over to dirt. The following notes/addendum were made by a local suspension tuner: ********************************************************* Wont' turn in: Fork changes make sense, but geometry and tire size/compound not mentioned Excessive Dive: Preload and compression changes make sense, but no mention of changing rebound to match preload, nor is there any mention of oil level or condition of oil Front pushes/trail braking number one cause is geometry and tire size/compound. Preload and compression changes are fine but no mention of changing rebound to match preload. Shock rebound may work but that is a long shot and will open another can of worms in this case. Front pushes/throttle: compression and preload changes are okay, but must match rebound to preload Chatter/trail braking rebound could be a source, but unlikely. most time due to low oil level or high oil level, or too much or too little preload and/or compression Chatter/throttle rebound for chassis imbalance front and rear, shock compression, or geometry WALLOW - shock only CHATTER - fork only Exiting/chatter/holds line generally fork or shock rebound creating instability Exiting/chatter/turns well correct on geometry but if no front tire tearing, leave it alone. Remove rear ride height only if tire tears Exiting/wallow/won't hold line soft shock so add compression and/or preload, then check rebound setting ********************************************************* And one thing I'll add; in addition to tire size, tread pattern, wear, and compound, inflation pressure (PSI) can have quite an effect on handling and 'feel'. To me, 15psi vs. 12psi is as noticeable as a few clicks of compression adjustment.
  7. Bump... It's renewal time folks
  8. Ahhh... the more things change, the more they stay the same. After a couple years hiatus from TT, I see the "YZ250 is awesome woods bike" thread remains a hot topic. A couple points from my personal handbag to throw things out of whack. The only bike I've ever thrown a leg over and been like this guy--> was a 2008 ktm 200xcw. It was stock, and that's the only time I've ridden one, never raced it. To address the 250fer's; I own an '07 yz250F that I specifically got to race hare scrambles (the yz was my enduro bike) & no matter how I flogged the shit out of it, it just didn't get it like the YZ... However- on an MX track, I could lap myself (250F>YZ250). To the 450er's; it's not a 450 & doesn't torque like one. Get over that. Wheelspin is a good thing. :thumbsup:I've ridden multiple late model 450s and for me they're too much. I'm much more suited to the wheelspin than the flipping-over-backwards the 450s have. But worse than that, I've damn near been thrown over the bars from the engine braking on those mules. The bikes are apples and oranges. To the KTMer's; Not so much apples and oranges, more like gravenstein and granny smiths. My current race bike is a KTM 250xc... because KTM had a better contingency for my district. I think I could probably beat myself on a YZ, but maybe that's not true. I've got sponsors to take care of suspension, engine, etc, regardless of the brand and haven't had the chance to race against myself. As I stated above I could whoop my own ass with a 250f on an MX track, but in the woods, it's an expensive turd/trail machine- maybe good for B class racing. For the 450s; If I gained 20 lbs, or just wanted a dedicated trail play bike, I'd look at the KLX 450 or the KTM. After all that, when Yamaha releases their final year YZ250 (or if I can afford one before then), I will own one again. I've had two in the past (2004 sold to a friend, and 2006, stolen) and not only is it my favorite 250 2 stroke, (having done decently well racing the KTM's) I will say it is my favorite bike overall. If I can, however, in the near future I'd love to try a KTM 150sx as a woods race bike.
  9. http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=534781&highlight= A complete how-to.
  10. My experience in going from Yamaha to KTM would confirm what you've been told. If the rider is used to a linkage type bike there will be an adjustment period. IMO, for offroad the linkage/no linkage is more of a 'different' feeling, rather than one being better or worse than the other. But I do think tuners struggle with it in MX/SX racing. What I've heard about Mike Alessi's trials and tribulations comes to mind.
  11. Sounds similar to what I do. Take the 250F out to the mx track weeknights for practice, then ride/race the 2 strokes in the woods on the weekends. As for the stopwatch, I'm faster with the 250F on the track and faster with 250 2T in the woods. It's all about getting power to the ground.
  12. D952 rear and 742FA or 745 on the front most of the time, S-12s in the mud.
  13. Might want to have your facts straight before posts like these. To quote Bob Hannah directly, from his MX files episode... ~Halfway through the episode, regarding the 1981 Saddleback national MX. "I'd been off for a year, no way to beat him [Kent Howerton]. He starts screwin' with me. Bangin' in, passing me in chickensh*t spots. I don't know if I flipped him off/he flipped me off..whatever. It got ugly and finally I had enough of it. So I said OK that's enough of this. We go over a double jump, he gets set up in the corner, I T-bone the sorry bastard. Hard as I could. He wobbles, doesn't go down, I set up and bang him again. Totally intentional. I admit it, I will break his leg." Him being a good rider is self-evident. Do you know him personally to make the 2nd statement have any validity? Or just basing it off the fact that he doesn't like people on the internet talking trash, or doesn't like when someone who runs at 80% of his speed tries to 'race' with him, endangering them both. As for who he is as a person... Have you taken a look at what Reed has done for supercross/motocross back in his home country? IMO, we need a lot more Hannahs, JLaws, and Chad Reeds and could do without the politically correct happy horsesh*t canned crap the golden boys spew on the podium. If the folks talkin' the trash spent that time and energy focusing on our rights as members of the OHV community, we'd probably be in a better position in regards to the huge land use problems we're facing. C'mon chatty Cathys, enough high school drama and gossip. Do something worthwhile.
  14. Even the core on my 250F is quite a bit bigger than the 2T's. About double the size, IIRC.
  15. I ran my '06 at 40:1 with Torco GP7. It was great, but maybe a tad overkill. I think 50-60:1 is a better ratio. I'm running 50:1 now and so far so good, will know more when it's time for a top end. Riding mostly northern CA, racing CC and enduros.