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txcaver

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About txcaver

  • Rank
    TT Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Montana
  • Interests
    hockey, mountaineering, and riding bikes to get there
  1. txcaver

    Yamaha XT250 2013

    Agile on the trails, keeps up with in city traffic. It is not a fast bike, and it is completely unsuitable for sustained highway speeds, but for riding to the local fishing lakes, streams, and rivers here in NW Montana, it could not be better. Simple, reliable, and light. And the button start works first time, every time.
  2. txcaver

    Yamaha XT250 (2013)

    0 comments

    Agile on the trails, keeps up with in city traffic. It is not a fast bike, and it is completely unsuitable for sustained highway speeds, but for riding to the local fishing lakes, streams, and rivers here in NW Montana, it could not be better. Simple, reliable, and light. And the button start works first time, every time.
  3. I must admit I've had a thing for Husqvarna since the mid 1980s. Benls, thanks for the pointer to Ossa. I haven't heard of them before, and they look cool, but I'm curious if they can handle 2 lane highway speeds... Thanks for the thoughts!
  4. Hi everybody, I thought I might throw this out there for some suggestions. I moved to northwestern Montana last winter, and my V-strom is just too big for accessing the trails to some of the high mountain lakes around here, not to mention that it's a bit of a pig in the snowy patches with Anakee 2s. I want a trail-worthy bike that meets the following criteria: -Light (less than 250, for sure, preferably closer to 220) for getting over/around things that I just can't ride over, and just picking up when I drop it -Low end grunt is far more important than top speed -Electric and kick start (I know, making it heavier already) -Capable of at least 60 mph and 200 mile day trips, so availability of at least a 4 gallon tank is really desirable -An engine that is reliable in the long term As it stands, it is fairly easy to plate many models here, provided a title is available. I'm 6' tall, 175 lbs + 20 lbs of gear, and in my mid-40s with 10 years of mostly street and fire road riding experience in Colorado. I have no interest in racing or motocross (fun to watch, but I break too easy when I crash hard these days). I don't mind turning wrenches on older models, but I am not a master mechanic, and I'm unopposed to buying a new/newish bike. The highest elevations I will probably ride to are 8,000 feet or less, home is at 3,000 feet, and most of my riding will be under 5,000. The closest thing I've ridden to the type of bike I'm looking for is a GasGas Pampera, but I want a button start when I kill it on a hillside in an awkward position, and big tanks aren't really around for that model. My KLR 250 (sold already) was way too heavy for what it was, and again, hard to kick in weird places. Thanks, Chris
  5. I've looked at some older TEs with kick only, and would really prefer an e-start for here in Colorado. Can anyone tell me when these were first put on the TEs? Cheers----Chris
  6. txcaver

    Big gas for klr 250?

    The KLR 600 tank will bolt up to an '01? I will pursue this further--thanks!----Chris
  7. My '01 KLR gets 60 to 75 mpg bone stock, depending on how much trail vs highway is encountered between fillups. My last 250 Honda was an '80 250 custom which only got around 50 mpg, but I suspect that things have changed. Cheers----Chris (buy the KLR)
  8. Howdy all-- I'm the proud new owner of a klr and love the bike (great for getting to then running around on Colorado's back roads). My only major gripe is that I can't get more than 160 miles out of my tank and that's to dead dry. I've seen the IMS tank for 3.2 gallons (only a .3 gain--hardly worth the $225). Does anybody out there know of a larger bolt up or possibly something that can be scavenged from another bike? See you on the trail----Chris
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