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      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

slowthump

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About slowthump

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  1. I don't get the need or benefit from titanium, unless you are sportin a 5% body fat number.
  2. Thanks. Can't wait for the snow to clear and get out rippin!
  3. I just picked up a 2001 cr250 and have ordered a new PWK carb and wondering if it will fit with the stock airbox. I have this carb on my 98 cr250 and love it. Thanks!
  4. My educated guess is that you are burning tranny oil. The only way to know for sure is to do the leak down pressure test. My 98 perpetually leaks through the power valve linkage which causes it to suck up a small amount of tranny oil. After I service and clean the power valve and grease the linkage, I do a pressure test and it does not leak or smoke. After a few rides it goes back to smoking and the pressure test reveals the leakage through the powervalve linkage and into transmission case. I've tried all kinds of things to stop the leakage but have given up as other than more spooge, the bike performs just fine.
  5. I have a 98 cr250 and have had the exact same thing happen. It a was a big air leak caused from the top of the carb not being screwed down tight. It took out my crank and scored the piston and cylinder. Absolutely do the pressure test. You can make the parts needed for about 5% of the cost of the parts you will wreck, not to mention the hassle. 2 strokes should be pressure tested frequently. Small air leaks will lean out the air/fuel mix and mess with your jetting. Once you have the parts and procedure down it takes about 15 minutes.
  6. I heard the following quote from a famous cowboy (Can't remember his name) while watching a pro rodeo event. It has to be said with a lot of Texas hill country drawl. It very much applies to dirt bike riding. "It ain't a matter of if ya git hurt, its when and how bad." I know there is a real chance of getting seriously injured and almost a certainty of getting battered, bruised and beat up every time I ride. I know I can lower the risk by riding smart and being properly equiped. There is a certain thrill obtained from going for a ride and riding very well and fast and at the end of the ride feeling like you cheated the odds again.
  7. Sweet video! Obviously 2 strokes are alive and kicken at national enduros as it looked to me like better than half were sporting beautiful pipes and making sweet ring a ding music. Dwight, was the hill really that steep to cause such a barrel roll or were you ad libbin for the camera? Might need to carry an ice axe to self arrrest!
  8. That's a good price for the bike even if it needs a lot of work. Parted out it would bring more. I agree that you have to figure on replacing all the bearings - wheels, linkage, swing arm, etc. Also figure on at least a top end, break pads and rotors, etc etc. Nothing cheap about owning a dirt bike.
  9. I just don't get the 18" rim theory. I run the stock 19" with 10 psi and ultra heavy duty tube. I have never had a flat or dented rim. And what about the extra weight, extra sidewall mush when turning with 18" rims? And Russel Bobbit replaces his standard 18" with a 19" on his smokin xc.
  10. Whatever works for you is what you need to maintain a healthy weight and be fit. I find it amusing to see how many people buy into the notion that you need to spend good money for a club membership, trainer, video, fitness machines, supplements, etc. All you need to stay fit is readily available to most all of us. What is not readily available is common sense. Maintaining a healthy weight is all simple math. Calories in minus calories burned equals your weight. If you are eating good quality healthy food 3 times per day in moderate amounts and get your heart rate up for 20 minutes per day, it is almost impossible not to be in good shape. You can't eat between meals and you can't eat junk food or most fast food. To get stronger, all you need to do is work the muscles you want to get stronger. I do pushups, pullups, situps and a few other ab burners. I squeeze a tennis ball while driving to work hand and forearms. For cardio, I do a number of things - run, ride bike, cross country ski, climb up and down the stairs for 10 minutes straight while at work. I don't do any excercising on any excercise machine. I find getting outside is key to keeping me going on the excersise.
  11. That jetting sounds pretty close. I live at about the same elevation and temp and the jets supplied are basically what I run in my airstriker. Try it out and swap as needed. The "race use only" is just probably just covering their but as the carb is not epa compliant.
  12. I do use the moly paste on the powervalve linkage and it works for a while. I know right away when it starts leaking again as the spooge comes back. I do lose some tranny fluid as well. Bike loses some crispness when leaking. It is just a pain to always be pulling the cylinder and relubing the pv linkage. I know from pressure testing that both my crank seals are good.
  13. Are you sure it is the crank seal? Did you pressurize the crankcase and then spray soapy water around the seal? The reason I ask is I get the same spooge and air leak coming through the exhaust valve shaft that runs from the crankcase up to the exhaust valve. Have tried several things like adding small orings and gobbing grease. It always holds pressure right after I get it back together but after a few rides starts leaking and spooging again. An air leak into the crankcase can come from either the crank seal or the exhaust valve linkage. The first thing to do is check the crank seal with soapy water while doing the pressure test. If that is not leaking, put the clutch cover back on, pressure test again. If still leaking then it is the linkage. I am going to try replacing the bushings that go around the linkage shaft and the shafts themselves. I'm not convinced this will do any good and think it is just not a good design. I've also thought about machining the cylinder to allow for an oil seal around the shaft but there does not seam to be enough material around the shaft to accomadate the hole for the seal.
  14. I replaced the clutch plates on my 98cr250 last summer. Ordered honda, all of them steel. I realy did not notice much of a flywheel effect or any difference in clutch operation. Certainly noticed the difference when changing tranny oil.
  15. I've been running my cr250 for the past 3 years in tight single track with plenty of rocks and roots and have never had pinch flat. I run 10 - 12 pounds pressure with an ultra heavy duty tube. I have noticed that the tubes are really scuffed up and worn thin in the sidewall area when it comes time to change the tire. My opinion is the 18" rear is not all that advantageous and in fact compromises handling a bit. Russell Bobbit runs 19" rear for that reason.