DaJoker

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About DaJoker

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    TT Newbie

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  • Location
    Colorado
  1. Excellent. I assumed that is the procedure, however, did not want to just start unbolting things. I wrench and an assumption can lead to problems. (not just on bikes) Thank you.
  2. Does anyone know how to remove the top bar (bridge) from the fork tubes on a CRF50? Any advise or information would be great. Thanks. Remove this. From this. (searched the forums)
  3. I assume that the hammering force is what truely extracted the bearings. I only heated the hub to a warm tempature not glowing red hot. I also heated the entire hub not just the area where the bearing was at. This created a uniform expansion since my wheel was in my garage in Colorado and it was below freezing. I would guess it was just a bit warmer than if you left it out in the sun on a very hot day. I could touch the hub and work with it without being burnt. When removing the old ones, I wouldn't worry about damage since they are going in the trash anyways. You can also heat up the hub before installing the new ones since the new ones are in the freezer. I must say that the tool was an excellent purchase. I had fun working on my bike instead of fighting it. I also have multiple bikes that will get the bearings replaced since it was easy.
  4. I tried to use the punch method, however, there was not enough lip on the race to get a good hit. The spacer would not move to allow room for the punch. I also tried using the concrete anchor bolt method. Wasted effort and $5. The bolt would slip out and could not get a good grip. (It seemed like it would work) For both methods I blasted the hub with a propane torch to loosen the bearings. I wanted to get back on the trails fast so I called the dealer and they wanted $35 to pop them out, $35 to press them in. (I already purchase the bearings) I'm too cheap for that, but caved in and purchased a Pit Posse Wheel Bearing Remover Set. $43 (Dealer: $35 + $35 + $bearings = bad deal) Now I have a tool to help with all my bikes. I started the job and they came out in 5 minutes. It took longer to post this message than removing the bearings. Select the proper size remover. The rod goes the other side of the hub and into the slot of the remover. Place on ground and hammer the rod into the remover. Heat the hub near the bearings. Place in bucket and hammer on the rod until the remover and race come out. This is what you end up with. Here is the tool. Note how the rod widens the remover as you hammer. In addition, the tool had an extra benefit. I hammered in the new bearings using the old ones on top. They installed quickly after freezing them and heating the hub. The old bearings also became a wedged into the tapered part of the hub. I used my new bearing tool to extract old bearings with little effort.
  5. Before you yank out the motor and split the case, I would make sure everything on the clutch side is in order. Double check the gearshift cam and spring. The symptoms for the broken gearshift spindle started out as just a small increase in lever movement. Shifting was still working. While out riding the gearshift spindle must have lost more of the weld and the lever travel increased. Shifting became a hit or miss operation because of the lateral movement of the gearshift spindle. (rocking back and forth) Sometimes it would shift, sometimes not. All of the items are located on the shifter side of the crank case. Good luck. I will try to upload a picture of the broken part which would explain it better than words.
  6. Just helped a friend replace his gearshift spindle that broke away. The weld that held it together detached, but did not break off. It would spin in place and shift with a bit of play. (needed to split the case) Good luck.
  7. I have an XR200R and an XR250R. Night and day difference.
  8. Thanks Oldturtle for the info. You were 100% on the pilot jet. I disasembled the carb and found it to be almost perfectly clean, however, the pilot jet was blocked. I did a quick clean up and the bike started like a champ. I checked and changed the oil and am waiting on a buddy to loan me his manual to adjust the valves. The oil was nasty and black as indian ink. This is the oldest oil I have ever seen. This bike is 100% stock and I assume it has had little or no maintinance on it. It has the original tires and hand grips! None of the bolts, except the oil plug, have any signs of ever being touched. Thanks again.
  9. I was wondering if anyone could give me advice about my new acquisition. 97’ XR250R It is completely stock with no modifications. I have been browsing the forum and have found a bunch of information. Sticky’s: XR250 "Helpful for the New XR owner" is great place to start. I picked it up and haven’t even attempted to start it yet. The last time the bike was started was about ten months ago. My questions are: What should I do before I attempt to get it running? (Examples: change gas, oil, rebuild carb, piston lube, valves, check this and that, etc…) What maintenance should I do to get it in shape? The original owner has never done any maintenance except the standard issue oil and plug change. (Examples: swing arm, carb, forks, clutch, valves, what to lube, etc…) Blunt instrument replies would be great. Thanks in advance.