Womlet

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About Womlet

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    TT Newbie

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  • Location
    Massachusetts
  • Interests
    Jeeps. Green DRZ's, History, Making and consuming good beer
  1. If the trailer is homemade you may very well have a striaght axle, but if it is not installed correctly it can cause the problem you are stating. You figure that if that axle isn't perfectly squared, or if neither of them are and that the builder just kind of eyeballed them they may not be straight and could be fighting each other causing your problem. Just think that a little bit off, on each axle can add up to alot of bit off, and then combine that with the amount of rotations that that little wheel has to travel that means alot of roations while fighting each other. It would be like having the front wheels on your car facing one way and the rears another, you would be eating up tires like crazy and getting a ton of blow outs. Trailer tires if I understand it correctly, are primarily designed to withstand long periods of sitting without deforming and decaying, and are not designed to withstand significant amount of tourque. So if the axles are not dead-on straight, the tires will be experiancing exsessive side loads and other such forces that they were not inted to withstand which can cause tire failure.
  2. I have had some luck using a steel toe boot. If you drag the toe across the cuts in the roads where the sensors are, it has worked for me, it just doesnt seem to work with boots that have stainless toes. The kick stand trick usually works pretty well if you can find the lines. If none of that, I just take a right on red and then turn around to whatever direction that I needed to go.
  3. S-10's are not usually very friendly trucks to lift, the IFS front end doesnt allow for much lift before your cv axles start to be at a very extreme angle, which will destroy them. Thats why there are only a very few lift kits avail for the 4wd and they are usually very expensive, and complicated because they have to lower your front axle assembly.
  4. The 8.3l cummins is pretty much just a bigger version of the older 5.9. And I have seen and worked on 5.9s used in heavy equipment applications that were the same basic engine as found in the dodge, they are usually tuned to a specific power need and may have some different types of injection systems but the engine is not that much of a difference. This site sells reman engines and gives a list of the many different types of applications that the cummins 6B is used in. Lots of listings there for construction/industrial. It is the same engine just in a different configuration. http://www.rebuiltdieselengines.com/cummins6b.html
  5. Cummins is the best diesel offered in ANY pickup on the market. It is basically the same engine that could and/or still can be found in lots of heavy duty applications, such as Gradalls, Just about all good sized Komatsu construction equip, Motorhomes, onsite large generators, and many different over the road, semi trucks. The bigger brother cummins, common in big motorhomes and in construction equip. is just about identicle to the 5.9 that is found in the dodge. It is a heavy duty engine tuned down for a pick up. I doubt that you will be seeing any of those crappy powerstroke or duramax engines being stuck into industrial applications. The big limitation for the cummins is that it is often stuck infront of a POS dodge auto tranny, even the new ones suck! But if you pair that with a 6spd that is a stout combo. The best scenario would see a new Ram with the cummins followed by an allison tranny, NOW that would be amazing!! It would be like driving a smaller version of a Semi down the road. But for any of those that say the Cummins doesn't put out power, just keep in mind that in the past 2 years there has been 3 versions offered in the ram, the low output 5.9, the 5.9 HO, and the best yet Cummins 600. I have driven all of the new Diesels, the duramax, Powerstroke and the new Cummins 600, and I have to say that the Cummins really lets you feel the torque, hit a hill loaded with that thing and it just spools up and sucks you back in your seat. Too bad dodge can't pair it with a NICE auto.
  6. http://www.overlandvans.com/ that site sells lift kits for several GM vans, as well as alot of good info if you want to stick a transefercase and a solid axles under any of the big 3 vans, or even if you are interested in lifting a 2wd. All around very interesting site!
  7. Nice XJ!, looks good with the TJ flares. MY dd is and trail rig is a 98 XJ, running 4.5 RE lift, full skids, rocker rails, snorkle, etc... Its my DD, because my green DRZ can be ridden to the trail and back home via road, trail, or Highway