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      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

GCannon

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About GCannon

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    California
  1. "That Guy" makes all of your repairs much better! Because you don't put up with that crap!
  2. I have been drilling through those for years, I use a countersunk screw through and a nylock nut on the other side. the trick is to get full engagment of the screw threads on the lock nut without over tightening the rubber.
  3. Since i run a skid plate I got tired of the 5 lbs of oily mud under my engine. I use a longer hose or extend the stock power valve vent hose (coolant overflow hose also) so the oil drips on the ground and my bike stays nice and clean.
  4. I started on one of those in 1975 was a 1972 GTMX 80 with the silver tank with purple stripe, put a lot of miles on that thing Maybe I need help too?
  5. Aluminum or steel frame?
  6. I agree the rich fuel mixture is washing the piston top clean as well as cooling it.
  7. Everything stated above^^ Clean the perch and lever and polish the pivot bolt then apply light grease. Move the clutch lever perch toward the center of the bike so you hand gets max leverage at the end of the lever. On older 125s make sure the cable did not touch the pipe and get burned.
  8. http://www.bridgestonemotorcycle.com/documents/oilpremix6.pdf Some light reading!
  9. Don't forget the lower shock bearing while your at it. Nice Ride!
  10. Worn water pump shaft also cause premature seal failure
  11. A man has to do what man's gotta do! Don't think we all wouldn't be doing the same thing!
  12. If I spent that kind of $$ all at once it would cost me a $10,000 bathroom remodel! I'm sure you understand!
  13. If it were me I would clean the carbs perfect and set the float level and check the screen on the tank petcock. Install new plugs. Then I would ride it carefully and find out for sure whether you need to change jets a little at a time. Why guess when you can test?
  14. Thanks I agree that Chamber shape is important. I subscribe to the "Hemi Head" school of thought. We had to make a special cutter with the cutter pivot that fit inside the chamber to make a radius cut that follows the existing chamber shape. I don't have any photos. This way I can maintain the basic shape of the stock head combustion chamber and enlarge the volume to what I need. this shape more closely resemble what the RK Tek head looks like. I maintain the shape of the stock yamaha chamber and just adjust the volume. The reason the RB and Eric Gorr heads look like they do is they use standard Lathe cutter and tooling so they have no way to cut a radius . Its too time consuming for a production shop. They end up reducing the squish area to get more head volume. They just make a quick taper cut across the shoulder of the chamber to increase the volume. My theory is the same as the RK tek website talks about Chamber shape. the hemi shape promotes the 360 degree flame front travel, One side benefit of a tight squish clearance I have found by accident is when the big crankshaft bearing goes bad the piston will hit the cylinder head. while this may seam bad it does little damage and You Know Immediately there is a problem (its very loud) so you can turn off the engine before it has a catastrophic failure costing you more money. If you or your kids are racing 125's you know what I mean This is a big advantage if you have young kids who have not learned to shut down when you hear funny noises, This lesson is best learned when your buying your own parts. I guess all i am saying is don't be afraid of a tight squish clearance .
  15. The last time I washed some engine cases and cylinder parts in the dishwasher I lost my privileges for a week! Boy did they come out clean.