Caferacerman

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About Caferacerman

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    Minnesota
  1. We have had two TMs in the last (16) months - a 2017 TM 300 Enduro 2-stroke and a 2018 TM 250 EN 4-stroke. Leading up to the TMs, we had a stable of KTMs, Italian Husqvarnas, Yamahas, Kawasakis, Hondas, etc. and in my opinion, the only applicable generalization about TM is "the TM is not for everyone." In other words, it will not be appreciated nor consumed by the masses for a number of reasons including,but not limited to, the fact that their hand-crafted production run is relatively low in comparison to the mass-produced production line of KTMs and Universal Jap bikes of the world. In response to the common denominator questions we get at the track: "Is it hard to get parts?" - NO. My son hit a tree WFO in third gear and bent the bar and an obscure bushing in the bar clamps...and broke his foot. I had all parts, including bolts, the next day...THE NEXT DAY, which is must faster than I used to get from my KTM dealer or any online KTM supplier. "What about support?" - Awesome. You will find the dealers and the distributor to be incredibly passionate about the TMs and that translates into an old-school customer experience. Ever get a response to your email at midnight from your KTM or Yamaha rep? Yeah, didn't think so... "In regards to the reliability and quality, I heard the PV this and then there was this one post about..." - Quality is second to none. When you maintain a TM, you will note the quality of each component and the craftsmanship shows. I have no doubt there have been unfortunate experiences in certain realms but I would suggest you try to qualify them. For instance, I bought a brand new KTM 250F and within the first two hours, it dropped a valve, ergo, all KTMs suck? I don't think so...You will find way more testimonies to the long life expectancy of a TM than the inverse. "Are there aftermarket parts?" - Some. If you look at the TM Gravity Racing website, you will see a sample of the aftermarket parts available for the TM. In comparison to the aftermarket parts available for the mass-produced brands, the selection pales in comparison for two reasons: first, as noted by many of the magazines, the TM is as close to a factory bike as the amateur can get without spending a million dollars. Look at the podium at Lorettas, look at the European GP and Enduros...those guys are running relatively stock TMs. In other words, what else do you need? Second, the production runs are low. If you are an aftermarket producer, would you produce a widget for a market of 10,000 or a market of 1,500? On the TM, I changed the seat cover and the tires and my kid took second in state in the Enduro series. On the KTMs we had, I was piping, valving suspension, offsets, breaking hubs, clutch slave protectors, pegs, levers, shift levers, blah, blah, blah, and the list goes on and on...if you like to tinker and fit your bike with the latest bling, do not buy a TM - if you would rather spend more time on the track than in the garage, buy a TM. "What about resale value? I heard there was this TM that sat on the floor in....." -Who cares? Again, the TM is not for everyone which means you have a smaller resale market. Then again, my local big-time dealer has brand a new 2015 and a 2016 YZ on the floor and every KTM I bought, was brand new and a year old. And when I sell my used dirt bikes, I never expect to get more than 50% of what I paid. It's a used dirt bike... In summary, I believe the magazines do a reasonable job of summarizing the demographic of the TM buyer - they are not for everyone. Most TM buyers have owned just about everything else and are not looking to repeat the same old experience gleaned from the same-old same-old. If you look at a TM in person and the first thing that comes to mind is one of the aforementioned inquiries, then the TM is not for you. If you look at a TM in person for the first time and you immediately think, "Wow, look at that!" then the TM is for you.
  2. All of the 2-stroke Enduro models, including the 144?
  3. Looks awesome! Where did you get your graphics? Thanks -
  4. Best of both worlds - button & kick
  5. Referencing our experience with test riding a 2017 TM 250Fi MX, owning a 2018 TM 250Fi EN, and a 2017 TM 300 2t EN, there are many notable engine differences between a TM MX and a TM Enduro. For example, the TM 300Fi MX has a five speed gearbox and the TM 300Fi EN has a six speed gearbox. TM truly understands the difference between MX and Enduro and their engines are designed and tuned to meet the different demands and as a result, both of our ENs lugged all day long in the woods and blasted everything on the wide open sections. Albeit the suspension is great in both disciplines, you will need to have it set up for your style and weight as it is set up hard from the factory. Referencing my very limited time on a Sherco, I believe the greater decision point is going to be the cockpit of both machines - Shercos tend to be a bit more compact whereas the TMs are a bit more open. I believe one of the magazines just did a review of the Sherco and noted the same thing?
  6. Congratulations! We have owned just about everything one of the marquees and objectively speaking, TMs exhibit the best of everything. I have no doubt you will sell a ton of them!
  7. tm

    X2 on the Scalvini. I believe they are one of the best-kept secrets out there as I have been running them on my Euro 2ts and 4ts and have found them to improve performance throughout the ranges without robbing any power.
  8. True, KTM riders are going to be reluctant to change brand but once we did, it was really difficult NOT getting another TM. We bought a 2017 2-stroke and my son decided he missed the 4-stroke. Checked out everything on the market and in the end, we bought another TM. For the money and what you get, it’s hard not to buy TMs once you get exposed to them. And as for parts, we get parts way faster than we ever did when we were riding orange.
  9. Did you ever manage to develop a rear disk guard?
  10. That is a sweet piece and a sweet price! Had a P3 or something on my 2017 300 and it was nearly as good as that one but it was way more expensive!
  11. The 300 EN is available with a 12L tank (3 gallons) and regarding price, the list is $9,195 and when I compared it to the list KTM at $9,099, it was relatively easy to justify when factoring in the after-market pipe and superior suspension.
  12. My son has logged close to five hours on his 2017 TM 300 EN 2st and during the last two rides through a local 12 mile woods loop, his riding partners have inquired if he will be moving to AA this year....riding behind him, I am amazed at what he can do on this bike from a cornering perspective. Once you get your hands on it during regular maintenance items, you REALLY begin to appreciate the quality of these bikes. Why everybody doesn't buy one is beyond me.
  13. Anybody aware of a company making TM disc Guards?
  14. Come on!!!! Get us our own forum!
  15. Put me on that list!