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    • Bryan Bosch

      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

shift23

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About shift23

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  1. Simply put, increase the number of teeth in the front or decrease the number of teeth in the rear result in higher top speed/less torque. Increase the number of teeth in the rear decrease the number of teeth in the front will result in lower top speed/more torque.
  2. 2 pairs of Oakley and 1 Scott.
  3. Interesting point you have there too. I guess all these factors together make for a difficult start.. If you don't know the technique.
  4. I don't have my 4-stroke yet. If I did, I'd take a look inside the carb and find out for myself. I was just curious as to if the jets were the same or not. Thanks for the reply
  5. That's the reply I was looking for!! Thanks for your help guys!
  6. I've jetted 2-stroke machines before, but never a 4-stroke. Are the jets the same? Or is the only difference still just between different brands of carbs.. ie: Mikuni vs. Keihin
  7. Why is it so hard for it to catch though? And why is it harder when the engine is hot? Anyone have a technical explanation for this?
  8. First of all, I'm a newbie and I'd like to say Hi to everyone on the board. I've been reading this board for a long time now and figured it's finally time to register. Being an original 2-stroke guy, I'm not that educated on the 4-stroke technology, but my next bike WILL be a 4-stroke, and I want to learn about them before I make my purchase. Anyway, on to the question.. Why are the 4-stroke engines so hard to start? And why are they even harder to start when they're hot? I understand they have very high compression, but figured that would only cause trouble in kicking them over, not how they actually start.