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      Video: 2019 Yamaha YZ250F Features & Benefits 

l1pa

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About l1pa

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  1. 1. Cracks in the plastic at the back of the gas tank (around the mounts). 2. Bent rims (trail riding is easier on the engine, hard on rims). 3. Oil leaks at the oil gallery lines where they go into the head (the manual says to vent after oil change by loosening the gallery bolt. They get stripped). 4. Check under the frame for damage. 5. Look around this forum for the starting technique, it REALLY makes your life simpler. 6. Look for oil seeping out of the frame around the head tube welds. They crack. Good Luck. I've had a 2001 for about a year. Nice bike. BTW most of this stuff has never happened to me! I just read about them here. This forum is well worth the reading.
  2. My son and I both ride, and are both on the North side of 200 lbs. We Have two bikes that we alternate on; a 2001 YZ426F and a YZ 250. Each has advantages and it's own special problems. The 426 is one heck of a nice bike. Lots of torque anywhere I've ever needed it (we ride only trails) and has proven to be very reliable. the CG of the bike feels higher and you need to take care cornering that you don't wash out the front wheel and stay light on the gas. This bike takes some additional maintenance because of the more complicated top end, but so far (about a year) nothing major. The 250 is a sweetheart of a bike, it's lighter, and feels it, it doesn't have that jerk when you hit the gas that scares the crap out of me sometimes. It's really all around easier to ride than the 426. Both bikes are fairly easy to start (once you read the threads here on how to do it) and fun to ride. I'd have a hard time picking one over the other.
  3. I recently replaced the rear rim on a 2001 YZ426F. I went with the "Pro Wheel" brand because the Excel rims apparently require you to purchase their spokes to fit their rims and Pro Wheel does not. The rim worked out alright, except for a slight hiccup at the rim weld. The tire takes up the bump, no problem. I bought a -.500 to +.500 dial indicator from Harbor Freight (fairly cheap) and did it myself. Not hard. See the how-to in the above replies.