Bermudacat

Members
  • Content count

    3,924
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2,571 Excellent

About Bermudacat

  • Rank
    TT Addict

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington

Recent Profile Visitors

1,390 profile views
  1. Sounds like a lean condition.
  2. If I did more creek crossings I too would probably switch the pivots to Belray ..................... I run Mobil 1 synth in the head bearings.
  3. I had done the Dynojet kit to the BSR before a Seattle to Sunnyside trip, otherwise the bike was stock. Seatlle to Sunnside is 180 miles one way. Odometer was at 750+ miles and it had its first oil change with Suzuki 10-40 dino at 500 miles. Time to finish the break-in was my thinking. We got on I-90 east and headed over Snoqualmie Pass (3,100 feet). My buddy was on his XR650L, perhaps comparable to a DRZ650. We stopped in Ellensberg to buy fuel, but before we tanked up, we did a few drag races. Bikes were dead even on several impromptu 1/8 mile drags. After fuel, we headed south along Manashtash Ridge, FS roads to Yakima, and onto Sunnyside. Seattle to Ellensburg is 110 miles, and we did the posted speed limit to get there. Leaving Sunnyside, we took the 'new' main freeway, which has a pretty decent grade to it. Time to test the DRZ! I slowly upped the pace until my buddy couldn't keep up. Speed was 70+, and true to Cameron's axiom; 'the only way an air cooled bike can shed more heat is to get hotter' rang true. The Honda lost efficiency, while the thermostat on the DRZ needed only to open a little further to maintain the pace. We made it from Sunnyside to Cle Ellum and refueled. This time I was going to really leave that Honda in the weeds! I was WFO whenever traffic permitted, but traffic was such that he never got that far behind. The mileage from Cle Ellum to the top of the pass is 48 miles, with an 800 foot elevation gain. At the top of the pass my bike started losing power. I had to switch the tank over to RES, so I had burned 2 gallons of gas going 48 miles, or 24MPG!!!! He no longer has that big, heavy slow Honda. He now has a 2009 WR450. Naturally, my DRZ is much further along in the mod department too, which is good. A stock DRZ will never keep up with a WR450. I must be working my DRZ much harder than you could ever work a stock one, and it is no worse for the wear. It runs like a top!
  4. Based on the the 522 builds with extreme top end only cams I've seen run in the sand over on Suzuki Central, I never fear grabbing a handful of throttle on my 400 and bumping the rev limiter whenever conditions permit. I run 20-50 Racing Group V synthetic and change it often.
  5. OK, so the Sachs has a 12mm rod all the way and the Showa has a shoulder? I'm missing the why of the 5003 being 'laterally' compatible with the Showa. Have you considered boring the ports on your Sachs valve?
  6. Would this take care of the seal and the valve at the same time? https://mx-tech.com/showa-16mm-id-50mm-shock-piston-ring/
  7. Got it. Bands are your interest, not port geometry.
  8. I run this stuff on my pivots........................ https://lucasoil.com/products/grease/red-n-tacky-grease
  9. I can see you...................................
  10. I have no preference between the later HC's or the E intake.
  11. Indeed. I know of a TU250 that spent it's life on the freeway. 60k miles and 85% of those miles at full throttle. Still runs and looks great. Clearly for this bike, Suzuki had the operating parameters dialed in pretty well. I think they have the parameters for the DRZ dialed in just as well. I have run mine WFO up a mountain highway from a full tank to reserve. It caused no problems.
  12. Are you curious about the port dimensions of the Showa? Do you know if the RSV for the two shocks is compatible?
  13. For the price of the HC2 EX you could have an E exhaust cam.
  14. Interesting. Same valve as the 50mm KYB and Showa. http://www.shocktreatment.com.au/upgrades.html
  15. I've done far journeys on my DRZ. If your jetted properly, not fuel starving it, running good oil and changing it often, you have nothing to fear. High revving engines that share the oil with the transmission need frequent oil changes.