blackadder

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About blackadder

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  1. I need to start wearing eyeglasses for off road riding - I can't see the trail as well as I used to. How do you keep them from steaming up while riding on a hot day? Any suggestions?
  2. Right. I'd forgotten about that. Thanks.
  3. Hello all: I have a 2005 xr650l with the carb from an XR600. I have an FMF exhaust on it. It starts and runs fine, but I think the pilot circuit may be a bit too rich. I'm riding at 100 - 1000 feet above sea level. I notice that even when stone cold, it never needs choke to start. If anyone out there is running this combination in similar conditions, I'd like to know what their carb jetting (pilot and main) is. Thanks, Ben
  4. I had a KTM 400EXC with a revloc clutch, and it was great, except that if you drowned the bike, you couldn't tow it to start it. That version of the revloc had no working clutch lever. Does the one for an XR400 have a working lever? If so, I'm interested.
  5. Before you start playing with lowering the suspension, try cutting down the seat. I have an XR400 and cutting down the seat made it possible to ride without falling over all the time It's easy to do. Pull the staples out of the seat cover, peel it off and cut the foam with a hacksaw blade or electric knife (think thanksgiving turkey). I cut mine down about 1 1/2 inches. When you have it where you want it, take the seat to an auto upholstery shop and have them smooth out the foam and restaple the cover. Here's a picture: I did this one myself, including restapling the cover. A decent upholstery shop will do a much better job.
  6. I have a Teraflex 140-80 on the back of my pig, and a Kenda K777 on the front. If you ride in deep sugar sand (like I do, in the Jersey Pine Barrens) it's a good combination. Put a rim lock on the front, inflate it to about 10 psi if you're riding in sand. The K777 is DOT legal, and not too expensive.
  7. My pig has an xr600 carb and it runs great. It's a direct swap, though if you want push/pull throttle actuation (two cables) you might have to mess with the cables a bit. It worked fine with one (pull) cable. Mine is jetted 165/65, and starts and runs with no problem. One tip: make sure you thread the cables past the idle adjustment on the inside, between the idle adjuster and the carb body. Otherwise you'll get a rubbing noise/feel when you turn the throttle.
  8. Here's the best picture I could find. I cut the foam down with a hacksaw blade, then took it to a small auto upholstery shop and they smoothed out the foam, put a light fabric on the foam surface and restapled the cover. It looks really good, and all for $30. I'm only 5' 7", and with the stock seat height I was barely able to reach the ground on tiptoe. Now I don't fall over on uneven ground anymore By the way, that's a TeraFlex 140-80 on the rear, and boy does it hook up in sand. Not the tire to use if you like to slide the rear, but loads of grip.
  9. Here's my pig doing a water crossing in the Jersey Pine Barrens during the PB300 last weekend.
  10. I have an XR650L with an XR600 carb. After carb disassembly and cleaning, bike runs great, except that the idle is uneven - it will drop, almost stall, then come back when I give it a little throttle. I run sea level mostly (NJ Pine Barrens) and it's desmogged, jetted 60 pilot, 160 main, with an FMF exhaust and no restrictions in the air intake. Idle dropoff is the only issue - bike starts and runs great otherwise. I pulled the plug and looked at the deposits - grey/brown, doesn't look rich. Anyone got any suggestions how to fix it? Thanks
  11. Is there crud in the petcock intake, in the fuel tank, that might be building up at the fuel inlet and blocking the inlet? Just a thought...and easy to check.
  12. If you've done an alternator upgrade, but want to go cheap and dirty on the battery pack, and use it to power a horn, try finding an old 6 volt horn (mine's off of a 78 Hodaka Wombat), and use 3 or 4 9 volt batteries in parallel, taped together. You can buy the snap on connectors at Radio Shack (they're cheap). The battery pack fits right under the seat, just past the end of the gas tank. Wire it up and you're good to go. It lasts a long time, since you rarely use the horn. The overvoltage doesn't seem to hurt the horn. You could probably power LED turn signals from it as well, though you'd have to change the resistors. If I recall correctly, it's 330 ohms for a 12 Volt system; for 9 Volts, you'd probably need around 270 ohms - but check the rated current for the LEDs and choose the resistors accordingly. I could be wrong about the resistor values. Don't know how long the batteries would last for turn signals, but if you don't use them much (mostly offroad, minimal onroad), it shouldn't matter. It will get you past a state inspection. I use my XR400 as a full up dirt bike, but I ride in some places where you need to be street legal (registered, insured, inspected).
  13. A DRZ400s is a very capable offroad bike. I've done two off road expeditions on them (one with Trail Bike Tours, 5 days in the Pyrenees, and one with Ad-Mo Tours in the US, 3 days out of Randsburg) and I wondered then - and now - why I don't own one. A 400s is a terrific trail bike. It's got more engine than my XR400, lugs better, seems to handle at least as well (and you can improve that still further if you wish - plenty of aftermarket suspension stuff available), and has the magic button - a good thing for a beginning rider. Its heavier than a KTM, but also much more robust, and will require less maintenance. It will do anything you ask of it on the trail, and will do plenty more that you won't have the nerve to try. You won't regret buying a 400s. If you decide you don't like it, sell it to me
  14. I never liked the 606 front in sand. The one I had on my xR400 tried to kill me every chance it got in sand. It just never wanted to hook up, and didn't want to steer, so you were constantly fighting it to keep the front from washing out. Even aired way down, it just didn't want to grip or steer in sand. The 606 rear wasn't nearly as bad in sand; it was actually pretty good over rocks and such. Right now my favorite front is Kenda K777f, an FIM enduro spec tire that's street legal. They're cheap, and they work great in sand. But I mostly ride offroad in the NJ Pine Barrens, and the only reason I use DOT knobbies is to get past PA state inspection (I live in PA).
  15. A word about trailwings: they are notorious around here (east coast USA, Pennsylvania - New Jersey) for crashing in mud or sand. They probably work fine on pavement, and maybe dry dirt or gravel, but take them into sand or mud and you're likely to be on your butt pretty quickly.