billj3cub

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About billj3cub

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    Oregon
  1. 47 ft lbs is too tight. Cylinder head cap nut 20 to 22 ft lb / 28 to 30 N-m / 2.8 to 3.0 kg-m Flywheel bolt 33 to 40 ft lb / 45 to 55 N-m / 4.5 to 5.5 kg-m This is per the Honda Service Manual 86-99.
  2. By the way, the fact that you would make those 3 bikes available to the grand kids and neighbors makes you a Super Hero in my book. If you live in the Beaverton, Oregon area I would come by and service your bikes for free. Everyone out there can keep Superman. I'll take arthur6 every day of the week. )
  3. Change the oil. At least change it every few years if they are not used much and are stored inside. If you do not do basics like change the oil, lube the chain and change the air filter occasionally, everything will be fine until it is not fine and then it will be too late. I have seen this type of "it works for me" attitude for 40+ years and it it does not serve the person (or their equipment) well at all.
  4. The XR100 has a centrifugal oil filter built into the right side of the crankshaft. If you look at a crankshaft parts diagram you will see a plate and O-ring on the right side of the right crank-half. Unfortunately, the plate is swagged onto the crank-half at manufacture so no simple removing and cleaning is going to be happening there. Our XR100 had a piece of broken timing chain left in the crankcase that got chewed into fine particles which I have thoroughly cleaned from the rest of the motor but I keep getting fine particles coming from crank while cleaning with solvent and pressurized air. I had to pump/blow/force a lot of cleaner/solvent/soap into the right end of the crank, forcing the cleaning solution into the centrifugal section behind the plate and out the small slot at the center of the plate near the crank bearing mounting boss. I finished off by sticking the garden hose squirter into the right end of the crank while spinning the rod to ensure all particles were flushing through. Wash, rinse, repeat 3 times. when I was done the rod spun very smoothly on the crank pin. BTW, You have to remove the right crank bearing to see the slot at the inside edge of the plate. There is no oil passage through the pin/crank to the left crank bearing. This cleaning stream may pick up any loose/floaty particles from the centrifugal filter chamber, since that is where the hole through the crank pin delivers oil to the rod. I was very, very through so every last speck is flushed out of the lower rod bearing because there is very little room for anything to flush past the crank-pin needle bearings and out past the very narrow gap between the rod and crank. The crank bearings should probably be replaced at this time because of the pressure exerted on them when taking them out which I did with a guillotine puller and hydraulic press. (Crank bearings are Honda part# 91002-ky4-901 $19/ea). This is also a perfect time to replace the lower timing chain drive gear (Honda part# 14311-436-300 $25). I also replaced the 4 transmission bearings because thy were a little gritty feeling when clean and dry. They cost $30 total for all 4. Any left over particles will be forced by centrifugal action into the outer edges of the chamber like it was designed to and compact it into a solid un-moving cake like we see on the XR200 series of motors that have a centrifugal oil filter that can be taken apart. You can check to see if these particles you are seeing are steel or aluminum with a magnet.
  5. I have done the conversion and made a great bike even better. The low seat height of the ttr125 plus the torque and HP of the xr200 that NO amount of mods on the 125 could reach. The xr200 motor weighs 7 or 8 pounds more than the ttr125.
  6. Did you guys look at my posting: ttr125 with xr200r motor http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=299602&highlight=xr200%2A I promise I will post pictures in the future. We choose the ttr125 because of the seat height. It was the biggest bike he could stradle at the time. We bought a rolling chassis with no motor and in choosing a motor I decided that; xr200 motors are plentiful and cheap, I can weld, bigger is better, only 7 pounds heavier, etc. This was a really, really good choise. I was going to put the larger wheels on it as he grew but he grew so fast that we just needed a bigger bike. We found a ttr250 basket case with a destroyed motor that we are now rebuilding. I still need all the chassis electrics to the ttr250 if anybody has any electrics for sale let me know.
  7. We were going to get an xr100 because that is the largest bike he could sit on and still have his feet barely touch the ground. I had a nice xr200r at the time but there is no way he could ride that. Five foot tall at age 11 and too short to ride the xr200r. We found a motorless ttr125 before we found an xr100, both having a low seat height, and got an xr200 rat bike for a motor/carb/electrics donor before we could find a ttr125 motor. As it is, he grew from 5' tall at age 11 to 6' tall at age 13. We have now found a ttr250 basket case. The ttr250 has a destroyed motor that I am now welding and rebuilding. It has no electrics so we are trying to find parts that will work for that. The ttr200 is a blast to ride around and is unstoppable but the ttr250 should be the perfect trail/woods/fun bike . In the mean time I found an ugly, but mechanically sound, '83 yz490 for him to play around on . And play he does. I hope I have not awakened the Throttle Happy Monster. I will post pictures in the future.
  8. After looking at the costs to significantly increase the power of my son's ttr125 I opted for another route. Honda xr200 motors are plentiful and fairly inexpensive, I can weld and fabricate, sooooooo... we now have a ttr200. It appears to be about 7 lbs heavier but has lots and lots and lots of torque. I applied all the hot rod tricks I know to the xr200 motor (deck the cylinder, port, polish, match, radius, etc) so it runs real strong for a 200cc motor. No amount of mods and $ could ever bring the 125cc motor up to the torque & horse power of this 200 install. It pulls reeeaaally strong at any RPM and any speed. It is a lot of fun rolling up to 200cc to 250cc 4 strokes with our little ttr125 and keeping up with or pulling past them. I honestly can't feel the weight difference between this bike and a stock ttr125. If you like to weld and fabricate I can post some hints and advice on what to consider when grafting a xr200 motor to a ttr125 frame. I am good with a torch but not so good with a computer so if someone will give advice on how to post pictures I would be glad to do that too. This is a fun forum. I have liked reading the posts and really had fun reading the replys. Release the pigeons and let the games begin.