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      2019 Zooks!   07/17/2018

      Suzuki Introduces 2019 Motocross, Dual Sport, Off-Road and Youth Models

Idaho Bruce

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About Idaho Bruce

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    TT Newbie

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    Idaho
  1. Ditto what JBBURTON said. I've ridden a wee and have owned a 1K since '02. You can't go wrong with either one, but I'm a power junkie and the 1K has it all over the wee. Yes, the wee is more flickable, but you've already got the DR for that. Not to say that the 1k isn't flickable by any means. It definitely holds its own with the sport bikes, but at the end of a 600 mile day you won't need a chiropractor. And if you don't mind buying used, an '02 or an '03 with the clutch basket upgrade taken care of for $5-5.5k had got to be the bargain of the century.
  2. BB, my K2 Strom loves sharing the garage space with the '96 DR650 I picked up used 14 mos ago. The DR/DL combo is the way to go...go for it, you won't be sorry! Idaho Bruce V-SRI #216
  3. Count me in that club. Each bike certainly has its purpose. I really wouldn't consider 600 mile day trips to the coast on the DR, with the liter V-Strom it's easy. On the other hand the DR is perfect for exploring the Idaho Nat'l forests close by. The Strom doesn't cut it for that environment. But if you can wangle one of each, it's the way to go...
  4. I'm about your size and have a '96 set to the lower suspension setting. I also have the OEM gel saddle that takes it down even a bit more. I haven't ridden one with a stock saddle, but if, even with the suspension in the low position it's still a bit too tall, the gel saddle is a good way to go. Cheers, Idaho Bruce
  5. Brian, I've got Gerbing's electric jacket and gloves that I have used only on my V-Strom. However, I also have the "Heat-Troller" which is basically just a variable resistor that you use to adjust the amount of heat. I'd be willing to bet that if you used a controller that adjusts the amount of juice, you could find a happy medium that would keep you warm and still allow the battery to charge.
  6. As does my '96. The noise has had me worried since I got the bike a month ago...I've been waiting for the thing to grenade one of these days. Glad to hear that it is common to the breed. I'll stop worrying.
  7. Thanks guys. This was my favorite kinda project; easy and rewarding. Unfortunately I don't see the California Innovations backpack/cooler listed on their website so the cooler option might not be available anymore.
  8. Hi Gang, Thought I'd share this with y'all. I was interested in buying a tailbag for my '96 DR650 but really didn't find anything out there that did it for me. I got to looking around the garage and spotted an old California Innovations backpack that I used for fishing long ago. The neat thing about this backpack is that it has a detachable cooler. I set the backpack on the OEM rack, and it looked like it just might fit pretty well. I have some scrap sheet aluminum and sketched out a template...a fitted sheet for the inside of the backpack, an identical fitted sheet for the outside of the backpack and another (shorter) sheet to u-bolt to the existing rack. Went to the fab shop and the hardware store yesterday, and drilled the holes and put it all together last night. Here are the pictures: Rack plate: http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_rack_plate.jpg http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_rack_plate1.jpg Inside of backpack with clevis and hitch pins (for quick removal): http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_interior1.jpg Backpack bottom and rack plate: http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_plates1.jpg Rear View: http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_rear.jpg Mounted backpack without cooler: http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag1.jpg http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag.jpg Mounted backpack with cooler: http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_cooler.jpg http://www.mobile-designs.com/DR650/tailbag_cooler1.jpg After all was said and done, I have about $40.00 for fab work and hardware into my new tailbag...not counting the backpack that I probably bought at K-Mart 10 years ago....
  9. Thanks Flea, glad to be here. The story and pictures has persuaded more than one person to wear a helmet here in "helmets optional" Idaho.
  10. Good luck Mr. V!
  11. Flea, I designed the "no deer" avatar shortly after I plowed into a four point buck at 65mph on my first V-Strom (7-07-03). I'm a firm believer in "all the gear all the time (ATGATT)" and it saved my life. I had the GPS on the bike and it recorded that the V-Strom went 170 feet from the time it hit the deer to the time it stopped forward motion. I flew over the handlebars, landed on my chest and listened to my chin bar grind down for another 20 feet past the bike. My only injury was abraded knees and elbows from rubbing against the inside of my jacket and pants. This happened on a two-lane highway at dusk - I never even had a chance to touch my brakes it happened so fast. So there you have it, when you see the deer avatar, you know its history! Pictures of the bike after the impact can be found here. Note the deer hair on the case guards and front fender!
  12. If the RTV does the job, then why not? It sure is an easier and cheaper way to stop the leak. I am lucky to have a friend that has disassembled hundreds of motorcycle engines over 40 years who was willing to "supervise." I learned a lot about the bike from the experience. The bigger question though, is why did it take Suzuki 13+ years to re-engineer a part that had been chronically failing? I've been a fan of Suzuki motorcycles for a long time - I've owned 5 different models in the last ten years and for the most part they have been great. But it's the little things like this where Suzuki really drops the ball.
  13. OTOH, replacing the base gasket with the new, improved metallic gasket will run you about 12 dollars and 4 hours worth of labor. Of course the head gasket needs to replaced as well. A friend and I replaced the base gasket in his garage on a Saturday. We had the cylinder off in an hour and a half - the most labor-intensive part of the project was scraping the old base gasket off the surfaces. Yea, it's more work than covering the back of the cylinder with RTV or whatever, but at least you know that it's not likely to happen again.
  14. Quick update - I can confirm that the DR650 BBS does indeed have the shop manual available, the hi-res version is approximately 84mb. The problem IS the base gasket after all and a mutual mechanic friend of ours has agreed to replace it. According to the manual, this can be done without pulling the engine. That was a surprise to me. Anyway, thanks for all the advice and it looks like I will be a DR owner before long. Cheers,
  15. Thanks for all your help, guys. Hopefully this is something simple because other than the oil seepage, the bike is perfect. I like the idea of a free shop manual too!