montroseman

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About montroseman

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    Colorado
  1. Is there another thread with info? If not, what is the plan?
  2. I went with a bunch of guys with Mike Kay organizing the trip late last February or early March; and was wondering if another orphange run was in the works? If so please count me in. I had a blast last year and am ready to get out of the snow again.
  3. Ditto:
  4. There should be some tension on the cable, have you tried putting it into neutral, and revving it to around 4500 rpm, per the instructions, and feeling the engagement point. Also check the other end of the cable to make sure it is in its slot correctly. Mine feels soft, until the motor is reving, then I can feel the wall at about 1" of pull. I followed the directions, and didn't have any issues. You may have to adjust the length with barrel adjuster, about 2 inches down the cable, and the adjuster, at the perch. The only issue I had was cutting the black boot to much.
  5. Rode the Delta side of the plateau this weekend, we hit snow at about 8,000-8,500 feet. Not real bad just some drifts etc. However, I don't think you could make it out to the Divide road, based on what we saw, I could be wrong though. Lots of downed timber higher up that hasn't been cleared yet. Most of the streams on the plateau are relatively small, and we had not problems with stream crossings. Note that if you are down lower where several tributaries feed into a larger stream they are real deep, and real fast right now. We took off of from 25 Mesa road and put in a nice 50 mile loop. Also note that temps have been in the low 80's so the snow is going fast.
  6. When you pull your driver side panel it is a 6 pin connector, next to where the fuse is. If you are careful you can use a very small flat blade, and pull the pin that is connected to the pink wire. Insert the screw driver from the connecting side of the connector, you can carefully push the plastic catch till it unhooks while pulling on the pink wire to remove it. Then you can tape it over the harness. Some guys insert it into the unused space in the connector, and then use rubber plug to plug the now empty hole where the pink wire plug was. Also, I cannot emphasize enough how well the JD diaphragm and leak jet kit worked, in addition to the standard jetting kit. I cannot help you with factory needles though, as I don't have any experience with them. I installed the JD jetting kit almost immediately after purchase. JD has ran his 450X at altitudes up to 12,500, while connected to exhaust gas analyzer. His stuff is pretty spot on.
  7. JD jetting, and diaphragm kit. Cut air box, back fire screen removed, pink wire disconnected, baffle pulled. Rode to around 8,000 ft this weekend, and bike ran good. Most of my riding is between 5,600 and 6,500 ft. this time of the year. JD jetting red needle 4th clip 165 main. JD Diaphragm kit, and leak jet combination. 42 pilot 1 3/4 turn out Could also run a 45 pilot at 1 1/8 turn out Nice tan plug. My bike finally runs without hiccuping very often. If running the JD kit at those elevations consistently you will probably be running a 160 or 162 main red needle at third clip.
  8. Krannie: Thanks for correcting the misinformation. I am amazed at the bad advice given at times. Smaller leak=larger volume of fuel from the accelerator pump. Your diaphragm also contributes to timing, and I think the duration of the squirt. There is also an adjustment that sets the delay between increased throttle position and the amount of delay before the pump squirts. This is to keep the accelerator pump from squirting all of the time with small changes in the throttle position. Since I am not a carb guru, and have to oil the cogs to think through this, I go with time proven remedies to CRFX woes. Specifically JD jetting kit, JD diaphragm-leak jet kit, cut the air box, disengage the pick wire if you want and either replace the stock muffler or pull the baffle if you want. Doing these things works, period. I absolutely cannot figure out why people try and reinvent the wheel when for a relatively small amount of money, approximately $100-200, you can purchase the parts necessary to get this bike running very well, and without the headaches of sourcing parts and information.
  9. Remind me not to let you use my bike. I have a heat strip on my left radiator, and if I fire my bike up in the garage cold, it is at around 210 within about 5 minutes. Add some load, and clutch slippage, and I can promise you your bikes temps will rise at a rapid rate. I know guys who can ride the same stuff I fight through in 1st in 2nd gear, they are also nationally ranked off road riders. I can assure you that their bikes don't get as hot as mine because they have more air flowing through their radiators, and they aren't slipping the clutch as much. You are welcome to come to Colorado and ride with me, I will either tell you "your a hell of a rider", or "I told you so". Pick your poison. Gorry: Very true on the gap on settings. These are a Centrifugally activated clutch, and the larger your gap the higher your RPM's must be before the clutch is fully engaged. Given their inherent design, if you aren't keeping your RPM's high enough to keep the clutch fully engaged, you are either slipping the clutch automatically, or it is disengaged and you are stopped.
  10. Telluride got snow on Tuesday, but the fresh snow was gone on Wednesday. I haven't done much riding in the Taylor Park area, but up high it isn't unusual to have snow on the passes until late June. Around Silverton the county plows a lot of the high passes in June, but if they didn't I don't know when the would necessarily open up. June is nice though because you don't have as many afternoon showers as you get in the late summer. Also it is kind of funny to ride across some snow in July, when it is 65 deg. out, Snow that time of the year actually has fairly decent traction, unless it is to deep, in which case you can bury stuff pretty quick.
  11. We have single track where you aren't out of first gear for 20 to 30 minutes, and you end up stopping to size up obstacles. Tell me your bike isn't going to get hot even at 60 deg. If I could ride it faster the clutch wouldn't be working as hard hence not creating as much heat, and I would be getting more air through the radiator transferring more btu's to the atmosphere. So yes single track and rekluse clutches can get hot unless you can ride it hard enough to keep the clutch fully engaged, and adequate air flowing through the radiator. I am trying to improve my skills where that is the case. However if my bike keeps burping, I might be forced to get 1 or 2 small light weight fans to keep the bikes temps down. I used to do a lot of rock crawling, and overheating was a constant fight for all involved. Automatic transmissions slipping, and low air flow cause a build up of heat. The guys running standards where constantly putting clutches in, and their motors still got hot. Most every body I knew including myself where running large aluminum radiator, oil coolers, tranny coolers, power steering cooler, and had the different coolers in different locations to try and get cool air. All of the coolers had supplemental electric fans either switched manual or with an electrical thermostat. Even then on a nasty section you could watch your tranny temp and other temps shoot through the roof. And this is with running appropriate size gearing. Nasty single track is almost the exact same set of environmental conditions. So pick your poison if it is nasty; either get good enough to go faster or figure out how to deal with the heat. I am also considering running two2cool, and seeing if that will help with the heat generated from the transmission side.
  12. JD jetting Cut air box pulled the baffle 5'600' red needle 4th clip 165 main 42 pilot 1 3/4 turns JD diaphragm and leak jet kit. If running JD I think you will be 160 or 155 main, red needle third clip. I am not sure about stock jetting as put JD jetting in to remedy the off idle bog immediately after purchase. Diaphragm and leak jet kit helped immensely with the bog issue.
  13. If you are really poking, like I do sometimes, you are really working the clutch with a rekluse. My bike will get hot, I also have braces. I was thinking about installing a fan, or learning to ride a little bit faster. I am working on faster right now. However, I wouldn't trade it.
  14. I have a rekluse on my 450X with a perch adjuster. It has helped a bunch when it gets nasty, you can throttle through nasty sections at speeds well below what you can seem to do with a manual clutch. Two side effects, no rear brake via the engine, if the bike is dead. Second the bike hooks up amazingly well. I absolutely love it, is it crutch, probably. However, it has increased my riding pleasure 10 fold. If I was a top level rider, I might not want one, but for B class or lower, they are ticket. My next bike will get one right away. The three things all of my bikes will get before I ride them, Suspension done, Scotts dampener, Rekluse. A crutch yes, but if it help so the heck what.
  15. Not all stations have premium, and I don't think the gas from the gallon milk jugs is premium. But the run ok on the magnum or green pump gas as well.