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Blutarsky

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Blutarsky last won the day on November 30 2011

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About Blutarsky

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  1. Are you a moron is not an insult.  It is a question.

    Are you such a moron that you can not understand this. 

    1. Ud_Luz

      Ud_Luz

      "No.  I am angry because the choice of morons like you may ruin our nation."

      Absolutely and clearly a personal attack against Rascal420. There is no way to construe this wording using "are". I'm sorry if you do not understand this.

      Please feel free to appeal this to Bryan Bosch, the owner. I suspect I know how he would interpret your statement too. 

    2. Blutarsky

      Blutarsky

      Well...he IS a moron.  But my bad....  I stand corrected.  

  2. Pay attention to how much better Tomac's bike is working in the corners than....EVERYONE'S. If he keeps off the dirt, he wins the title. He is coming into corners so hot that other riders check up because they think he is about to clean them out...and the bike sticks and he comes nowhere near touching them. He has the magic combo....he is railing the corners, and fast through the whoops. This is one reason Eli is getting starts. He is so confident in the bike that he can run it hard into that first corner. Watch the Detroit start....he was 6th...no 5th...wait...no 2nd. That is all cornering and confidence.
  3. Supercross

    I hope he is riding east. Riding that dirt is not going to help him west.
  4. I wouldn't waste your time with those folks over in Town Square. They're the most closed minded, ignorant, racist, mysogynistic, homophobic bunch of Trump humpers you could ever run into... You're never changing any of their minds, especially with rationality and./or facts. Cheers!

  5. Supercross

    DV on Bubba around 10:00 in... never heard a guy who won SXs talk about Chad like this... find an example of an elite level guy oohing and aahing over Chad, and I will stand corrected. Those best qualified to comment on a rider are other elite riders, and none of the elite guys talk about Chad the way the do / did about James. http://pulpmxshow.com/sites/pulpmxshow.com/files/podcasts/160222_pulpmxshow_musquin_lindstrom_marshall_vuillemin.mp3 Sadly I think DV is right. I just dont think it is in James to put in the level of work required to run at the front. Christ he had 18 months to prepare...and he blew it. Time to call it a career...and if he does not...get off his ass and put in more work than he ever has before. That is what it takes today.
  6. Most of the time when riders spend too much time between finishing their braking and getting on the gas and staying on it, it is because they really do not know how to brake and enter corners. I think you problem is likely a lack of understanding of how to really enter a corner on the brakes at the limit. Work on that...and everything else will get a lot easier. This is why Gary Semics and other coaches often say that improving braking makes the biggest improvement for mid level riders. If you have supreme confidence and skill in braking, you will feel a lot more comfortable going fast. Also, it is about dynamic stability in the bike. When you are braking hard in the right position, the bike is stable. When you are on the gas, forward on the bike, with the front wheel light and the rear planted..the bike is stable. When you are coasting...the bike is not stable. You have to minimize periods of instability.
  7. Supercross

    SX is an intense sport, and you can spend only so long at the top before you lose the drive, and the willingness to risk your neck. Anywhere from 8-12 years at the elite level, and you are done mentally. There are a few exceptions...but not many at the championship level. Stew was probably riding at that level 4 years before he even went pro....so by 2010...he had 12 years riding at a level no one else really could. It is just damn hard to keep that level of focus for that long. Chad realistically NEVER rode at a level that Stewart rode at for 10+ years. When Bubba was a rookie in the 125 class...riders who were WINNING races in the 250 class would go out of their way to watch 125 practice and all the 125 races because they knew they were seeing something beyond what they could even do. No one ever did that with Chad.
  8. Supercross

    Yeah...until they go back and watch the 2009 season....
  9. Supercross

    Sorry but James effected the choices that MM made, which resulted in the case on the triple. Then, James was continuing to jump the following section, and MM was afraid Stew was going to land on him, so he tried to move right, and got out of control. If Stew had checked up in the whoops, and then stayed far left down on the flat apron in the LH 180...none of this would have happened. He went from full left in the whoops, to 2/3 right in the LH 180, and RD was able to completely close the gap to Marv. That was because of Stew. Brain fade by Stew, but this is still a lesser mistake than RD made at A1. The consequences were minor. A guy does not win a race. RD hurt a guy badly.
  10. We are saying the same thing. Trajectory is determined by only ONE thing. The angle of the center of mass. Scrubbing allows you to create a lower trajectory because the center of mass tracks the face of the jump even less.
  11. Transition is a real short phase...you do not do much turning at all there. If you are doing most of your turning here...you are doing it wrong. If you are spending a lot of time not braking hard or on the gas hard, you are doing it wrong. You need to be either on the brake hard...or on the throttle hard. The mid phase, transition from brakes to throttle should last less than 1s. My guess is you are probably not comfortable with the first phase, and that is where your problem originates. You need to pull the turning forward in the process, and learn to turn the bike a bit more under braking. That way your transition phase, the dangerous phase, is reduced to a split second.
  12. Seat time. You have not yet figured out how to feel what the bike is doing quickly enough, and then adjust your position. There are 3 phases you can be in when cornering standing up. 1. Entering a corner while braking and turning. You will be LOW. Butt hovering off the fender, hips BACK, chin on the cross bar. Losing the front here is almost always from too much front brake and not being back enough and low enough. 2. Transition. You let your body float forward in anticipation of catching it with throttle. Weird stuff can happen here. Sometimes you lose the front, sometimes the rear, and you can go down FAST and HARD. The trick is to stay on the rear brake as you come forward, while fading off the front. This will help settle the bike and maintain stability. As you come forward, you have to pick up the throttle at just the right time. 3. On the gas / after the apex. You are on the gas hard, squeezing with your knees, way forward, and 'surfing' the bike with the foot pegs. You arm are loose. You are still low, but forward and low. You HAVE to learn to control the bike with the pegs. None of this weight the outside peg BS. You are standing, and the pegs are how you control the bike. There is not much weight on the front, so you can not "really lose the front", and at this point the handlebars are for only one thing...a place to hang the throttle. When grip is good, I will actually often have most of my weight on the inside peg, and lock bike against my inside leg. McGrath talks about this in one of his old vids. What phase are you having problems with?
  13. Isn't a seated scrub an oxymoron from an effectiveness standpoint? You want to flatten your trajectory to jump less. Why would you give up all the reduction in trajectory that comes about when you start tall. Then lower your CG over the last half of the ramp? Of course, if you want to look cool...another thing entirely.
  14. As long as the rider and bike stay connected, the trajectory of them together will be determined by the angle of the combined center of mass as the rear wheel leaves the jump. Basic physics. When you absorb, you start tall, and stay tall as the bike loads into the fact. As it starts to rebound, you collapse to the seat to lower the combined center of mass of the bike and rider relative to the surface. This changes the angle of the combined center of mass, resulting in a flatter trajectory. There is a limit to how much you can absorb straight up and down. Once your butt is on the seat, and you chest on the bar pad...you can not get any lower straight up and down. A scrub increases how much you can flatten your trajectory by laying both the bike and rider over. The gyro effect of the rear wheel helps you recover from the flat and sideways attitude. As the bike pitches over and noses down, the gyroscopic forces cause the bike to stand back up and the rear to come back. These forces are reacted through the center of the rear wheel, and to some extent the center of the motor.
  15. Faster riders are hitting obstacles faster. To do that, they have to position their body differently than you. The answer is go faster. What we often call style, is just the position that fast guys have to be in to balance the forces that come with hitting stuff that fast.