b_king

Members
  • Content count

    122
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

28 Excellent

About b_king

  • Rank
    TT Bronze Member

Contact Methods

Profile Information

  • Location
    Ontario
  • Interests
    Dirtbiking, Racing, Mountain Biking, Weight Training, Running, Partying
  1. I purchased a 4.5 amp hour battery and installed a battery holder from a KTM 250EXC on the subframe rear cross section. As well as a KX450F airbox, allowing a bigger filter, more power, less weight and because I bought a quality Japanese made Yuasa, the bike works fine.
  2. I would adjust them as there is a range of clearance for a reason. Loose end of the range valves provide more power and better throttle response. If you run them tight, when the engine is at operating temperature, they will actually eventually keep the valves open and you will lose power and engine longevity. Generally of all the modern 4 stroke 450's, the Yamaha and Kawi are probably the most valve train reliable if serviced and tuned properly.
  3. Thanks for the reply. I'm going to disassemble them and try to figure this out. So my question is with the rebound adjusters, do I back out how ever many clicks I have, or just count the actual 20, then reinstall everything. I'm positive I threaded the adjuster onto the rod all the way, then seated the nut and tightening the nut to the adjuster, but we'll see. As for the compressions adjusters, I don't normally run them that far out, I was just going through the motions of where everything is and a mid point to start figuring out my setup with the new oil. Though asking that, if I do end up having to run them that far open(soft) does that mean the 2.5w wasn't enough and I should go back to a 5 or so? As for the bleeding procedure, like I mentioned above, there really isn't one because the amount of oil I put in the inner cartridge isn't overfilling it by any means, so there will be air in it, but always in it because the oil isn't enough. How does the amount/level of oil in the inner cartridge affect the reactions of the fork? In contrast, I know the KX forks are typically overfill and bleed style, so is this for tuning to specific offroad style riding as opposed to MX?
  4. So, over of the winter I rebuilt my forks, they're KYB 48mm? from a KLX450R. As per a suggestion of a local pro woods rider, I tried putting in 2.5w in the inner cartridge, and kept 5w in the outer. I've rebuilt the forks before when the seals blew and the year before with no problems. BUT, this year, both rebound adjusters have only 17 clicks of adjustment, instead of the 20 which they had before, and the compression adjusters have 25 and 27, instead of the 22 which they should have. So my question is what's gone wrong. I back off both adjusters prior to disassembly, to the correct amount of clicks. I installed the rebound adjuster correctly tightening the nut to the adjuster. The thing that's bothered me after reading some threads here is the bleeding procedure for the inner cartridge. By following the manual I don't overfill it, I have a specified amount of oil, which allows the compression valve assembly to go in without spilling out fluid. I followed the bleeding procedure of pumping it several times, they laying it flat and pumping it the full stroke to blow out any left over air and excess oil, though nothing came out. So can the adjuster assemblies be damaged in some way, or what have I done wrong?
  5. Does anyone know if the KX shrouds will fit on the KLX, with a stock tank? I'm thinking about also going to the Acerbis, but from what I've read the Acerbis uses the stock shrouds as well. I want the look of the KX shrouds with the holes.
  6. You can do it as many times as you like as long as you use a fresh gasket and the proper torque.
  7. It continued into 2005 with the intro of the KX250F and the RMZ250, just for the curious.
  8. I have a Full X3 Titanium/Carbon Enduro System. It's a pretty slick setup, much much lighter than stock. The headpipe is similar to that of the KX, so much shorter, but not as wide(ID). So it keeps some of the bottem end, but not as much as the stock or lowboy would give you. I personally don't find it to be a problem as it suits my riding style. The only fitment issue I had is the kickstarter touches the headpipe ever so slightly with the supplied spacer for the subframe. I simply machined up my own which was slightly bigger and it's all good to go now.
  9. Don't forget to cut the tail on the heli coil once installed. The section of aluminium is not big enough to drill out and retap to a larger size, so that knocks off a threaded insert as well. The main thing to be careful about with the helicoil, is make sure you GO IN STRAIGHT. Other than that it's easy.
  10. None of the KLX or KFX flywheels will fit on the KX because the crank is different. You'd have to replace the crank, engine cover, etc. Now because the KFX and KLX both have electric start, I'm unsure about the length difference between them, so they might work. One would have to look at them to compare and measure. I doubt the part numbers are the same though.
  11. It's hard to take a picture of the filter on the inside of the tank, but there's one in there.
  12. You could simply swap out springs, most due to rear anyways even for enduro riding. The difference in the suspension is not just springs, it's valving and most likely weight of oil. The KLX450R is totally capable of being jumped, you just have to be conscious of the softer suspension. I would respring and maybe change the inner cartridge oil to a 7w or even 10 if you want it really stiff and slow. But just remember stiffening it up for the track will make it a handful offroad. It's hard to compromise but situations. You could even source out some ebay forks and a shock and just swap them every time you hit up a track. That will be a bit more costly, but probably the best way to get the best of both worlds.
  13. What's different?
  14. Most likely skipped a tooth on the cam.
  15. The day I brought the bike home, after going over it, I put a small zip tie on each end of the rubber boot to seal it. I have since split the cases and replaced the seal, but I've never had an issue with it leaking. You could try the old fork seal technique with a feeler gauge to get the dirt out, but the shaft is probably way too small in diameter to use one. So I would simply wipe it off as you operate the clutch allowing it to be pulled in and out and kept clean.