TTin IT

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About TTin IT

  • Rank
    TT Newbie

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  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Flyin or ridin. What else is there?
  1. consider steping it up to 12v and be happy ever after. I was in the same boat and rewound my stator and am verry happy as now I can run a real headlamp (HID) and parts are easy to come by. You could modify a LED lamp I am sure but you might just make your own with parts from a electronics supplier?. here is a link on a rewind of the stator ita a XR650 but use your imagination If your stator is similar http://www.xr650r.us/stator/
  2. Yep yamaha CDIs are tempermental If you know electronics well you can replace it with a inexpensive Honda CDI I got a new honda over rev unit to work on my yamie and it has never run better. Cost new was under $50.
  3. thats the way I view it 72 and earlier don't require signals. That is the way it has been. Cant say if there is newer laws in effect??
  4. Well there are others out there as strange as me.(people who like TT600s) But my excuse (for being strange) is that out here in Cali you can’t get a dirt bike registered for street use anymore. As the original owner of this street registered 83 TT600 I decided to modify the old steed. And I must say it is really more than I expected it to be. It performs well on faster dirt and any public road its geared high and has seen 100 mph If you change the gearing it will do tight stuff no problem, but not good for the road This engine has a 12 to 1 piston, 410-lift cam, pipe and stock carbs with uni filters (no airbox) The engine is not the most reliable, problems for me have mostly been in the gearbox and this one has had the cases split many times for shifting and gear problems. But remember it’s a 83 and It has been beat to death in its younger years I has been on motocrosss, enduro and flat tracks Now it lives the easy life as a commuter to work and a fire roads bike. I weighed it on my toilet scale (a fairly accurate one) and wet (1/2 tank of fuel) I see 275# The suspension if from a Honda CR Forks are 47mm Showa dual damp from linderman engineering. Shock swing arm and brakes are 97 CR500 O ya did I mention its Cali street legaal.
  5. Once in visual range look to the inside of the turn usually there is a berm built up to the outside. Visualize where you plan to pivot in the corner while in the straight before you square. I look to where my front tire will be well below the berm not where the back tire will be. Approach the turn fast as you can breaking while down shifting once in your lowest usable gear a bought 20 –40 feet before the apex I pull in the clutch and start over braking with the rear brake and increase pressure till it skids up the berm (rear tire) front brake on too but regular pressure. Its real hard to get the amount and timing down at first but the rear break will decrease the radius by skiding when you get it right. OK now the hard part. When I pull in the clutch prior to the turn I get on the gas some to anticipate exit. But not too much as it will be harder to turn (gyroscopic inertia from crank shaft). Once I see I can start to accelerate I release all brakes and really get on the gas feeding in clutch and gas for as much as traction will allow. If you over power here (wheel spin) you will decrease the radious too much So proper clutch use is critical. I use the same style on 2 or 4 strokes. they work on the same physics.
  6. I was that way and all my buddies too. I learned to ride on a flat track (go fast turn left is all we knew) Got over it though and it really don’t matter no more. To get over it we would spend equal time going right then left Was like a whole new track even though we were just going right.
  7. If you ride a KX450F how do you get off the start line? 2nd or 3rd Gear depends on traction right? If you don’t know I suggest you learn that first, and get clutch action working in a straight line real well before applying it to a corner. Drag racing a friend over and over is a great way to have fun and learn what different techniques work. You can apply this slipping technique to corners and to a greater extent, as there is less traction available in some turns. If you learn to square off a really sharp turn or berm you really shouldn’t be in any gear lower than the gear that you would use on the start line (assuming equal traction) So slipping is an option in this application. Once I learned this technique I took me to the next level. (Went from roostee to roostor) But it is difficult to master. Lots of practice, its not a basic level skill. Throttle leads clutch - have more power available and apply it with the clutch. Sorry cants explain it much better. It’s a man and machine thing.
  8. CRAZY asks So none of you are using the clutch to shift (up & down)? Now you guys will really try to thrash me on this but hear goes. This varies greatly from bike to bike A new bike or a bike with new gears is hardest to shift. I recommend seasoning your trainee before racing. You’ll know when its ready when you can shift with out the clutch under power. Not necessarily full power but good load. If your trainee will not do that? You’re at a disadvantage to those that can. Most all-new bikes will. OK to use the clutch while shifting? Try this (note this is a more advanced style of riding and might confuse those who are still working on the basics, just like slipping the clutch) As your bike is revving out and nearing peak output apply pressure on the shifter ahead of the time you want to shift (some bikes will shift if aggressive enough) and start to apply pressure to clutch and the shifter until it does shift but keep the power on. Roosting all the way. Down shifting same thing in reverse but lots less load off when light throttle. Now you got to know I have blown lots of gears I spend more money in gears than clutch parts. I can typically get a year of hard riding before problems occour with gears. If you want to go fast you Don't worry abought breaking stuff. concentrate on what makes you fastest and that only.
  9. You guys need to quit worrying a bought wearing out your clutch plates and basket That’s like worrying a bought tire wear if you want to learn you got to wear stuff out. And I really doubt you’ll wear out your clutch very soon and I doubt any of you have? I ride a CR500 weigh 250 lbs and slip the HELLp out of the clutch and replace roughly 5 or more rear tires before I mess with the clutch. Motorcycle clutches are very durable, when used within reason. In all my years of riding (too many to post) I have never needed to replace a basket. You’ll know if your over slipping when your free play increases at the lever, that’s a sign of over heating. You must slip to win. How do you come off the starting line? Why is this the fastest way in to the first corner? I apply the same principle all the way around the track, why wouldn’t you? Why do most bikes have an easy to access clutch cover? Now go burn up some tires and maybe a clutch.
  10. If you can afford it If you can start it If you can ride it IF YES TO ABOVE Your good to go, age is not a factor There is a lot to be said for riding one of the best freedoms we have
  11. hummm 2nd time on this ? a little cut and paste. 2&4 stroke it don’t matter its all a bought power available and traction available. Typically a 4 stroke has broader power so It could be said less clutch is necessary But don’t let that stop you from slipping especially if you need to win a race it is very necessary to learn. And you might need to do clutch maintenance just like changing tires? Typically In high traction (moist loam) I use less slipping and more downshifting but I better be able to pin the throttle and use the power without wheel spin out of the corners or I might be better off slipping out of the turn in a higher gear (less shifting and smoother power delivery) In low traction (hard pack and mud) more slipping less down shifting you’ll get a better drive out of the corner with more control. So go ride and try riding a gear high in the corner and slip, you’ll be glad you did.
  12. 2&4 stroke it don’t matter its all a bought power available and traction available. Typically a 4 stroke has broader power so It could be said less clutch is necessary But don’t let that stop you from slipping especially if you need to win a race it is very necessary to learn. And you might need to do clutch maintenance just like changing tires? Typically In high traction (moist loam) I use less slipping and more downshifting but I better be able to pin the throttle and use the power without wheel spin out of the corners or I might be better off slipping out of the turn in a higher gear (less shifting and smoother power delivery) In low traction (hard pack and mud) more slipping less down shifting you’ll get a better drive out of the corner with more control. So go ride and try riding a gear high in the corner and slip, you’ll be glad you did.
  13. Welcome to the club. I am the original owner of a 84 TT600 that has had a lot of mods and still running strong after what seems a bazillion miles. But I must admit there has been several major overhauls inbetween. As this bike rode several enduros and some Moto-X. now see if I can post a pic Humm I dont see pic in preview?