Bob East

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About Bob East

  • Rank
    TT Member

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  • Location
    Washington
  • Interests
    Hunting, fishing, flying, bicycling (road) and motorcycle dirt riding
  1. Hi, I'm trying to find a replacement motor for my buddy's 86 XR600R. I'd like to find one in the Pacific Northwest so I can see it before I purchase it. So, if you know someone that has one sitting on the shelf or in a wrecked bike, please email me. Rgds, Bob
  2. Are you sure that it's the stator? My bet would be with the rectifier being bad. Rgds, Bob East
  3. If you're going to be serious about a true "Built in the USA" truck, I don't think any vehicle built can claim that all it's major components are all from the USA. Chevy diesels have Isuzu motors, I'm not sure where Cummins builds it's parts but if I remember correctly, my Dodge truck said it was assembled in Mexico, and Ford has a many of it's parts coming from places like Japan and I know that some of it's cars and pick-ups are assembled in Mexico. That being said, I like my RAM 2500 Quad-Cab Long-bed 4X4 6-speed manual with Cummins engine. It has 600 ft/lbs maximum torque and 325 stock HP. With proper normal maintenance, I should expect the engine to go beyond 500,000 miles. The only complaint I have is that it is a pain to drive in certain parts of the city and it's a real bitch to turn around on a narrow timber access road. However, those complaints would be for any truck in the same class with a 160 inch wheelbase. It will tow anything I need to tow these days and it handles snow very well. I had it in 18"+ during elk season and I only used chains one day out of 5. I have to agree with the poster that mentioned ride. If you don't like a stiff riding truck, you won't like ANY of the "Heavy Duty" pick-ups. They're designed to carry big loads without significant spring sag and that equates to a very stiff ride. If you want a pick-up that will tow heavy loads and you must have an automatic transmission, I'd recommend the Chevy Durimax Diesel with the Allison automatic transmission. That Allison transmission, according to a guy that rebuilds transmissions of all types, is the best thing since sliced bread. On the other hand, Dodge automatics are the worst of all the big pick-ups, diesel or otherwise. My buddy bought a 2005 Cummins powered Dodge RAM 2500 4X4 Quad-Cab shortbed and within 10 months it had to have a new transmission. The first thing that happened was that it jumped out of Park while it was parked idling. He didn't have the emergency brake set so it backed into a car. About 2 months later, the transmission grenaded on him. I don't think he'd ever used it to pull a trailer or haul a big load. BTW, I advised against him buying the Dodge with the automatic but he did it anyway. I just bought a spare set of wheels so I could have my winter traction tires mounted on one set of wheels and my rest of the year Michelin's on the other set. I figure that I should get about 10 years of use out of the traction tires before they have to be replaced. At around $1,100 for the set, I don't want to be replacing those tires too often. It really cuts down the road noise, the ride is better, and my mileage is slightly better with the "All season" tires.
  4. Baffles are used to silence the exhaust. They allow the exhaust gasses to do several high to low pressure excursions before they exit the rear of the exhaust pipe. This tends to break-up the shock wave that would otherwise directly exit the exhaust. The idea is similar to that used to silence firearms. The trick is to be able to make this happen without seriously affecting the exhaust flow because that will produce back-pressure and most of the time that's not desirable.
  5. Hi, 3 mm is .118 inch. That's quite a bit of boring. I don't know what the limits are for one of these cylinders but most engines only allow about .030 overbore. I'd do like one of the other posters suggested, take the piston and the cylinder to your machinist and see if it is possible. Rgds, Bob East
  6. Hi, I looked-up the value in the NADA website for a 1986 XR600R and it was around $300.00...So, that's what the pros will pay one of them. Rgds, Bob East
  7. You might want to add a tube repair kit to that list of tools. Another useful thing to have is a piece of old tube that can be used if you ever get a large hole in your tire. It would have to be from something that has a thick tube because you use it between your inner-tube and the tire. Rgds, Bob East
  8. According to my aluminum welding guru, another reason for the spitting is that those cases are made of an aluminum/magnesium alloy and the stuff is extremely difficult to weld. Also, if it ever catches fire, it can be nearly impossible to extinguish. Rgds, Bob East
  9. I definitely think that it was the three beers that lubed the process!! Bob East
  10. Hi Jerry, Did anyone ever respond to your request? I'm searching for one, too. Rgds, Bob East
  11. The clearance between the stator and the flywheel shouldn't make much, if any, difference as long as it doesn't hit. The number of magnetic lines of flux cutting the windings in the stator probably won't change significantly and that's what counts. As for touching-up the coating, well, I'm not competent to comment on that aspect of your problem. Good luck, Bob East
  12. You're just a mere pup!!! I broke my ankle on my fifth parachute jump when I was 44 and that was 11 years ago. Almost every summer, I ride the Seattle to Portland bicycle classic in one day, 205 miles on a pedal road bike. However, I agree with you about road rash, it really sucks!! Rgds, Bob East
  13. Hi Nate, Yes, that might necessitate the use of higher octane gas if the compression ratio goes above what it currently is. I don't know what the upper limit compression ratio is for an air-cooled engine with respect to using 92 octane gas. I do know that a water cooled engine can be successfully run at 10.5:1 because that's what my Porsche 928's stock compression ratio is. It tends to differ with air-cooled engines because the heads run hotter than liquid cooled heads. For example, the airplane I used to own had a compression ratio of 8.7:1 and was considered "High compression." It wouldn't run on 87 octane gas. It was air cooled. The head temperature during climb-out, at full power, would be at least 300° F. Anyway, it sounds like you'll have a real handful once you finish with the mods. I, on the other hand, only want my bike for cruising the logging roads, in the national forests, and a couple of ORV trails where there's some excellent mule deer hunting. I'm too old for that hardcore riding!! Rgds, Bob East
  14. Hi Greg, I don't know about that, the Honda Elements aren't all that pretty. I guess they make it up in good mileage where they lose it in looks. Rgds, Bob East
  15. Hi Scott, I have a suggestion, go to a car dealer and take some test drives. Try examples of the trucks you think you might like to purchase. Then, you will have a "Seat of the pants" knowledge of the various vehicles. Just make sure to have a good set of ear plugs to use when the salesman starts on his diatribe. Bose noise cancelling headphones work well to cancel unwanted outside noise like that of some used car salesmen when they try to talk technical. Rgds, Bob East