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      2019 Zooks!   07/17/2018

      Suzuki Introduces 2019 Motocross, Dual Sport, Off-Road and Youth Models

Ooshka

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About Ooshka

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  1. Sounds like you've got a problem with the rotor gear clutch on the flywheel. I'd take the flywheel off and check it. The cog should spin one way but not the other.
  2. Stand it on its back wheel and kick it over until water stops coming out of the exhaust. Put it back on the ground, take the air filter out then kick it with choke until it starts. Done this loads of times with badly flooded bikes
  3. That's a blockage in the carb. When you cleaned it, did you strip down the float bowl, remove all the jets and blow everything through with carb cleaner and a compressed air hose? It only takes a tiny bit of dirt in there to foul it up.
  4. Race sag is important for front fork performance. If you're running 118mm, this will push out the angle of the front forks and they won't be able to respond as well, making them seem harsh. I've experienced this on bikes before, when I tried everything to get the forks dialled in but it was the sag that was out. I would increase the rear pre-load to get down to between 90-100mm race sag before you make any more changes. That's how the bike is specified to be setup and the suspension won't work optimally if it's too far out.
  5. Yes, but it's the regulator which will blow eventually; it's in the same unit as the rectifier. I smashed my light off on a tree a while ago and just used an aftermarket light with no bulb in. When I eventually tried to wire the lights it just kept blowing the bulb so needed a new regulator/rectifier. The headlight bulb runs on 12v AC current straight off the stator, through the regulator. The rear light runs on the 12v DC circuit and this is ok to disconnect.
  6. Yes, clutch will not disengage properly so it will drag the clutch slightly with the lever pulled in and do things like clunk loudly going into gear.
  7. Hmm, I should try this with my standard pipe next time I go out. The best test would be to try the original map above, and then see how it performs and work from there. Thinking about it, I would go for less FI figures to start with as you say, maybe -1 across the board, as you have less time to get rid of the exhaust. It will rev slower too so might look to increase the IG numbers by 1 across the board to compensate, certainly the bottom link of IG numbers could be increased. They're minus in the standard map to remove the twitchy performance on small throttle openings but this should be less of a problem with the standard pipe. I would try: FI IG +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 -1 0 0 0 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 -2 -2 -3 As far as I know, nothing you can program with the tuner will affect the startup or idle settings as the settings only start at 3000 revs. I presume you're already using the manual choke on the throttle body? And why would you kickstart a WR? I've never used mine. If you're talking about a YZ or FX I would expect they have a different base map to the WR anyway so I don't know how these maps would perform.
  8. Hi Stelio, glad you like it. I found it completely changes the way the bike rides and gives me a big grin every time I go out. I've tried experimenting a bit more with the small throttle opening at high revs. I found the standard map was awful because it was so sensitive in this part of the map you couldn't really control the power and the bike just lurched in the gear so I kept having to change up early to keep control. I've also tried retarding the ignition all the way to -6 at small throttle openings but then I found the power drops off so much you have to change gear again. Anyway, after a few attempts at improving this map I'm now back riding it again. It's the best map I've tried so far even after many attempts to better it. It's just so strong and predictable, you don't really have to think about what gear you're in or what the engine is doing, you can just focus on the riding.
  9. The front forks are amazing on the 15-17, they just handle anything you throw at them with ease. But I find the new bikes are also lighter on the front, so they don't tend to drop into dips and holes like the old bike did, and they turn better. Gives you loads of confidence on the bike.
  10. Yes, that signifies error code 33
  11. Cool, it's great that you like it. I've been playing around with the settings on this map over the last few months but I keep coming back to it as the best all round map. But I have created a very slightly changed version which is more for general trail riding and reduces the strong throttle response off the bottom. The original map is great if you like riding fast (my usual riding!) but for a long day's trail riding I found it was tiring me out so modified it as below. Only the bottom left and mid-left values for FI have changed. FI IG +2 +3 +4 +2 +3 +3 +2 +1 +1 0 +3 +2 +3 +4 +4 -3 -3 -4
  12. I found the hard hitting map gave a good power increase at the top end but it lacked a lot of mid-range power, even when used on a motocross track, so I started tweaking it but eventually just built my own map, starting from the base map. It seemed easier in the end.
  13. I'd loosen the triple clamp bolts and the front axle pinch bolts too. Straighten it all up, tighten the triple clamp bolts to the right torque (18NM I think) then pump the front forks with the brake on and tighten the axle pinch bolts.
  14. Sounds alright for a cold engine. You should listen to a KTM from cold!
  15. I've raced with both for many years on Yam 250Fs and I couldn't tell any difference between the full system and just the muffler