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      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

Anthony Haas

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About Anthony Haas

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    Oregon
  1. We're running a Dunlop D739 front and a Maxxis IT on the rear and have been very happy with this combo.
  2. In your first picture, if you're on the gas you could be a quite a bit further forward, in fact your head is well behind your bars. Rather than squatting on the bike, try keeping your legs tighter and bend into your attack position more from your waist. You want to use your legs to force your bike into the ground to maximize traction and if your legs get noodly you're just riding around on the bike rather than controlling it. Keep practicing any you'll get a feel for it!
  3. We have an Amsoil store here that sells fork oil. I'm not sure what you have against buying at a M/C shop or accessory outlet (you could always order from TT also), but I'd definitely stick with a purpose blended fork oil. You'll get better, more consistent performance and longer seal life....
  4. I'd also try to force yourself further forward over the bars, this usually forces you into a more standing position. The more you progress the more you will need to be over the front of the bike as well.
  5. Like I said, a good rider can be very competitive with lesser riders even on a bike that is way underpowered for their size. Lots of times you will actually even have more fun on that bike because you are wringing it out and feel like a hero, and if you're having fun, that's what's most important. The original poster asked a specific question though that seemed to be kind of a competition based questio (ie. - he wanted to at least be able to do what the other kid was doing and hang with him). From years of racing I always tend to look at things from a racing viewpoint, and from that point, he is simply too big for a 125. There's a real reason that you won't find any 195lb pro's on 125's or 250F's at the nationals- it's because the 140lb kids pull you by 15-20 feet out of each corner.
  6. Man, at close to 200lbs, I'd be looking for a good used YZ250 you could trade your bike in on - you're way too big for a 125. The 140lb kid you were riding with falls right into the perfect size range for a 125. A 125 will pull him around the track well, while a 125 won't get someone your size around the track even close to competitively unless you are simply a more talented rider....
  7. I just posted a comment on the regulations.gov site Coffee linked to in the first post. I suggested that they actually put the tariff on items that have large powerful companies behind them so that they get the changes they want instead of the weak results they will get from what they are targeting. If they put a 100% tariff on autos and shoes and the EU starts getting calls from BMW, Mercedes and Adidas they will take some action - those are very large powerful companies - in relation companies like KTM, Husky, etc will be ignored, but they will listen when the big guys come calling....
  8. I don't notice it as much as the old Ultimate 4, there is still a different odor of oxy race gas, but I think it is less than the old stuff had when you ran it...
  9. Is a 756RR even available in sizing for these bikes??? I've never seen anything but 21/19 sizing available with them. I've run the RR fronts on big bikes before and love them - they do wear faster, but I felt it was well worth it.
  10. 2400 miles....
  11. Here's your first hand experience. Back in the late 80's early 90's I took some bad advice and used ATF in my 125 transmissions for a couple years and I can personally say that I went through a rediculous number of clutches. That being said once I switched to Mc specific gear oil my clutch problems stopped. I have also used the cheapest pre-friction inhibiting additive oil I can find in my gearboxes since plenty of times and had no problems with any transmissions or clutches since - on race bikes (sorry ExWA, I don't personally consider a 400 EXC a race bike- it's only slightly less sturdily built or reliable than an XR, your 230 or an anvil). Even though I'll use some cheap stuff for my tranny, I always use a high quality "engine" oil. I think that there's a lot of truth on all sides here - notice the manufacturers dont just recommend any high quality oil - they want you to buy their oil so they can make a profit - that's business. I'm sure there is definitely a level at which the oil quality can become overkill for some bikes and riding and is just not needed - but I have no idea where that point is or which oil it is. I'm also just as sure that "any oil will do" is not necessarily true or the best advice for all the possible situations out there. Oh yeah, I also totally agree with ExWA about the WD-40 hurting your chain myth....
  12. Magic-Man, The bars that Jam is talking about will not work for you. He most likely did not notice that you are on a 150. They would be much lower and wider than your OEM bars. We have a CR-High Mini bend on my sons bike and they provide much more room - enough that it's quite comfortable for me to go out and moto too and I'm over 5'8". Hope this helps!
  13. I paid about $200 for the parts when last replaced my piston & rings and re-shimmed my valves this summer and it's something you can do pretty easily yourself. If you need to replace the valves also there can be a huge range in price just in the parts alone and the work that needs to be done can become much more complex....
  14. Due to the soft initial portion of the fork travel they dive really bad. My bet is that that's a lot of your problem. I used some 1 inch stainless steel washers stacked to gain about 5/8 of an inch of preload and it cured the tremendous diving problem on my sons bike. For $2 i'd give that a try first, I think you'll be pleased with the results.
  15. Supercross

    Yep, that's exactly who it was. Even though Shawn has gone a totally different direction now, he was tremendously driven and commited back then. And he would make a track out of any old beat up cow trail so that he could practice. Shawn did get to the national pro level and I agree with some of the posts that you can't make up for a persons internal drive to succeed with extra money. But I've gotta say, it's a lot easier for someone to make that statement discounting the importance of money if they're not the one riding some beat up, dusty, bomb cratered quary every day on a clapped out bike so they can compete while their competition waters and preps their personal track before they go out on their new bike. It's a lot easier to get motivated to do one of those options than it is the other....