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      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

Virtus

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About Virtus

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  • Location
    Arkansas
  • Interests
    If it has an engine I'm game.
  1. 1. Loved the "OM*G" sign above the arrow at the downhill section. (Wow, Thumpertalk automatically censors the F where the * is. ) 2. I destroyed a brand new set of Dunlops on some mine trailings like those in the video. It was a good time so it is OK. 3. That enduro looked seriously fun.
  2. The US market is filled with hot hatches in addition to the Gulf you mentioned by makers like Subaru, Mitsubishi, and Mazda. There is an especially large selection of cars in the US that are four cylinder sedans the size of Vectra or Mondeo. These are only a bit larger than the average hot hatch. So, I’m not real sure there is a lack of availability in the US. For example, I drive a Z car with over 300 hp. They are available. Americans just don’t like driving them. I suggest a few reasons why. You can’t bring home a 4X8 sheet of plywood in the boot of a Vectra. A Smart Car (which is available but rarely seen in the US) or will always lose in a crash with a minivan. The US government has minimum bumper height regulations which rule out most cars available in any EU country. The United States had a bout with an Eastern European car (the Yugo) which left a terrible legacy. Remember, Yugo means, “You go but you gotta walk back.” Skoda doesn’t stand a chance even though it is a VW. Lets not even talk about Trabant. Two full sized GMC Sierras can’t pass each other on the high street in most villages in the UK. Two extended bed GMC Sierras can pass each other in the average US town going sideways and still not hit the diagonally parked cars. The average car park in the US is enormous and they are everywhere. Road Conditions: US towns have an excessive love of enormous speed bumps everywhere you can put them. Also road crews are unable to comprehend smooth transitions between roads. They also refuse to fix potholes with anything other than cold patch which repairs a pothole for about two days. Most SUV, minivan, pickup trucks, or plush bottom luxo boat drivers don’t notice bumps because their wheels are enormous or suspensions are mushy.
  3. run 32:1 and piddle with your jetting and needle settings. read here and here
  4. Ha. The lady at the end of the block called the cops on me for riding on the street. They drove by and didn't even stop. lol. Did you have any problem where the stock year plastics rubbed marks on the frame and rear shock reservoir? Is so, how did you deal with the rub marks. Your work looks good.
  5. Smoke too much? Take away its cigarettes Usually, smoke is a couple of things. jetting: my CR250 ('98) is picky about its jetting. Summer jetting just smokes everyone out during the winter. Seriously, stick to the fuel/oil ratio suggested by Honda. It should be 32:1 or so. Stick to it because that is how your engine and its bearings are lubricated. Here are a couple of jetting related links: Jetting Guide Jetting Flowchart Try to keep fresh fuel. I burn my old stuff in the lawn mower, weed eater, etc. You can smell castor oil for a block around my house. The other thing that causes smoke could be a leak into the crank case. If this is the case your bike could run lean and trash the engine. In this instance, the smoke is oil from the crankcase being sucked in the combustion air. The right side crank seal among a couple of others can contribute to this. To test this, borrow or make a pressure tester and to a pressure test on the crank case. This was my first tester You really have to be picky about the pressure tester and carb boot connection because that connection has leaked on me in the past. If you want to fork out the bux and don't have a lathe buy one that fits the air boot on your bike. If not, make the newer faster better pressure testing device. and another link for shameless self promotion.http://users.conwaycorp.net/virtus/page2/speed/speed.htm
  6. Here are a couple more: The swingarm picture was taken after a five hour ride on trails flooded after one of the recent hurricanes dumped rain for a week straight. Rocky yet muddy with lots of debris. It took another week to wipe the grin from my face.
  7. A while back, I had a bit of gunk grab hold of the valve stem which held the valve open long enough to hit the piston. It happened when the engine was at high revs. They were intake valves also.
  8. I'm not sure what your local hare scramble series offers, but ours has a short course series for riders under a certain age. I'm not sure what the max age is, but you may get some time on the track.
  9. If I sit around and eat M&Ms for a week, I weigh about 160-165. When I lay off the Ms, I drop to the 150s. Most of the riding I do is on colossally hard Arkansas clay which turns to mondo slippery goo when it is wet. There are lots sections that have crushed up shale and modest sized rocks. I have been riding 10 PSI since the advice was given, and have had few unexpected traction problems. Knock wood, I have never had a hole in the tube. What usually happens is the lugs on the edge of the tire start cracking at the base, and they just snap off somewhere in the woods.
  10. I was told by a much more experienced rider than I that higher pressure (>12 PSI or so) is responsible for plucking the lugs off the edges of my tires. Is there any truth to this? I was trying to keep 15 PSI at the time.
  11. #796 - lets see. I think the gas is on when the knob is horizontal. huh? It must be on the other side. -or- #796 - Crap the narcolepsy is back.
  12. I was told that aftermarket slider bushings and guide bushings tend to make later disassembly a big problem. Namely, the Teflon coating balls up and makes it impossible to removes the lower fork legs. See this link for the fight with my aftermarket sliders. PS the caps look just like the stock ones on my '98 CR250R.
  13. I don't know how valid this answer is, but I find the stock part number for the needed part and check other years part number. Often they are the same part number several years on. Service Honda has a list of part numbers '98s. It depends on the part. Rad shrouds only go for a couple of years, but a 19" tire fits an every year. P.S. I love the 98 CR250R.