dangwartz

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About dangwartz

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    Texas
  1. I had same problem. 06 yz450fv false neutrals between 1st and 2nd. Tried Amsoil, and problem went away. How often does the stopper lever bearing need to be checked? Are the ball bearings small enough to plug an oil passage?
  2. Not add further confusion. I came across this link while I was surfing. It's a link to Stefan Everts bike. Take a look at the Technical suplier list and the lubricants. They claim to use Yamalube on Everts factory bike. http://everts.yamaha-racing.com/bike_technical.asp
  3. Yep! Back in the day, I had to walk to school 10 miles, up hill both ways, in sub-zero temps, too.
  4. I tried installing the 2nd GYTR plate and had the same problem. The front two mounting holes are too far apart. Rather than sending it back for a refund, I guess I'll break out the old rat-tail file and elongate the existing holes on the plate. It shouldn't take much. So much for the thinking that a Yamaha part will fit a Yamaha.
  5. Age is a factor, too. I'm no spring chicken. I grew up on 2-stroke zingers. Recently, I was riding a 93 KX250, which beat me to death. The power band was pipey, the handling was quick and the suspension poor. It didn't make sense to put any money into it, so I bought a YZ450F. I wanted something with suspension that would be easy on my joints, a smooth controllable power band and no head shake. I read the reviews. Talked to people. Read thumpertalk. Shied away from the Honda just because of the valve issues. Went with the YZ. For me, the difference is night and day. At first I was a little nervous about my decision, but I haven't looked back, cause I am having way too much fun on my thumper. I don't even miss my the zinger. I'm not saying anything negative about zingers. I'm just saying that for my particular needs, the thumper is the right choice. Good luck.
  6. I bought a GYTR just recently and I was only able to get 2 of the 3 holes to align. The basic problem is that the 2 front holes on the plate are too far apart by a mm. Trying to get both front bolts in requires patience, which I didn't have. I was also worried about binding I felt on the front bolts as I turned them. I didn't want to damage any threads. So, I sent it back for another. I know it's not my frame. I only have 10 hours on the bike and I haven't put it down. They really should have made at least one of the front 2 holes elongated to account for tolerance. Just got the 2nd GYTR glide plate from Yamaha and will try to install it tomorrow. The first thing that I noticed is that the 2nd plate has the letters GYTR stamped on it. The first plate did not have anything stamped on it. I don't know if this makes a difference, but I will report back here about the fit.
  7. In your first post your friend said "dude your bike smells like it's burning something". If it smells like your oil is burning, and there is no evidence of oil on the exhaust system or engine, then I would have to wonder about the quality of the oil. I've dribbled oil on a hot exhaust manifold and it smokes. So, if you're not seeing smoke or oil leaks, then the oil in your engine is breaking down, causing the burnt smell. The manual says to use "(Non-Friction modified)" motor oil and "additives could cause clutch slippage". Could it be that the oil you were using is causing the clutch to slip, then to overheat, resulting in the burnt oil smell?
  8. If the chain is overly tight, is it possible to prematurely wear out the counter shaft and rear wheel drive side bearings? Also, could this cause a bearing to bind, allowing it to spin within the pocket? I hope that the bearings, like the yz250f valves, aren't defective from the vendor. How many hours do you have on your bike? I guess I'll be checking my rear hub before the weekend.
  9. I'm older than you and decided in January to go with a 4-stroke. I grew up on 2-strokes and I won't go back. It was a tough decision to choose a thumper after spending all my life on zingers. Honestly, I don't feel that my thumper makes me feel lazier. I feel it's just as physically demanding, because I can get on the throttle sooner and the brakes later. As a result, I seem to be fighting the forces of acceleration and deceleration much more on my thumper than on my zinger. I feel it's just as mentally demanding, because I can now focus on the track, strategy and line selection instead of focusing on how to keep the zinger under control and in the meat of its power band. I find myself trying all kinds of different lines and entering/exiting corners harder with my thumper. When I crank on the throttle of my thumper it moves forward immediately and I'm fighting acceleration while trying to keep the front wheel down. On my zinger, instead of instant forward movement, I would get instant wheel spin. I also think that the additional weight of the thumper makes you work a bit harder. I am having an absolute blast with my thumper. Thought I'd share my experience and opinions with you. Good Luck.
  10. I'm doing the same!!!!!
  11. I'm sorry to hear about your misery. That really sucks. Good luck with the rebuild.
  12. If you're worried about your engine temp, try some temp strips from Pro Circuit. They just stick onto your cyclinder. I think I bought a couple for less than $20. Mine seems to run between 171F-182F according to the temp strip. That was on 98F day in TX. For the smell, have someone ride behind you to watch for blue smoke from your exhaust. This is sign of burning oil in your engine. Also, check your exhaust system for any black, oily drool. Look at the end of your muffler and make sure its dry. Should only be dry, black carbon residue, but no oily drool. Good Luck
  13. YEP! Looked at mine after about 6 hours of time. It's got wear. I wish I would have read about this problem before I got the bike. I'm a 1st time Yamaha owner and it makes me wonder how many swingarms out there have been destroyed. My Kawi chain slider does not move. I'm going to look at its swingarm for wear. If there is none, I'm going to use those (special) washers to pinch my slider to the Yami swingarm. Thanks for posting this very important topic. And thanks for Thumpertalk.com.
  14. Pends on your elevation, too. I'm at 700 ft and mine took a 50 pilot jet. Yamaha mechanics at the local shop say Yamaha recommends 48 for my area. I know of others resorting to the 50 as well. Higher elevations, where the air is thinner, will probably require a leaner pilot jet than the 48-50 for my area. Check with your local Yamaha mechanic.
  15. Ain't that the truth.